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Tagged with “technology” (76)

  1. How Facebook tracks you on Android

    In this talk, we’re looking at third party tracking on Android. We’ve captured and decrypted data in transit between our own devices and Facebook servers. It turns out that some apps routinely send Facebook information about your device and usage patterns - the second the app is opened. We’ll walk you through the technical part of our analysis and end with a call to action: We believe that both Facebook and developers can do more to avoid oversharing, profiling and damaging the privacy of their users.

    In this talk, we’re looking at third party tracking on Android. We’ve captured and decrypted data in transit between our own devices and Facebook servers. It turns out that some apps routinely send Facebook information about your device and usage patterns - the second the app is opened. We’ll walk you through the technical part of our analysis and end with a call to action: We believe that both Facebook and developers can do more to avoid oversharing, profiling and damaging the privacy of their users.

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    Tagged with technology

    —Huffduffed by ykgoon

  2. The Supply Chain

    An October Surprise of a different sort - Windows 10 update deletes users’ files
    A security researcher has massively weaponzied the existing MicroTik vulnerability and released it as a proof-of-concept
    A clever voicemail WhatsApp OTP bypass
    What happened with that recent Google+ breach?
    Google tightens up its Chrome extensions security policies
    WiFi radio protocol designations finally switch to simple version numbering
    Intel unwraps its 9th-generation processors
    Head-spinning PDF updates from Adobe and Foxit (this isn’t a competition, guys!)
    Bloomberg’s earth-shaking controversial report on Chinese hardware hacking
    

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    Tagged with technology

    —Huffduffed by ykgoon

  3. How Aragon Manages DAOs with Luis Cuende

    Humans organize into groups. There are lots of group types: religions, corporations, national governments, state governments, citizenries, clubs, musical bands.

    Every group has governance. Governance defines the rules, and the ways that rules change. The United States requires citizens to pay taxes. A corporation requires you to show up to work, but they have to pay you a salary.

    Most groups today are managed by people. If you break a law, you have to go to court and sit in front of a judge and jury, who decide how you will be punished. If you work at a corporation, and you have a problem with your manager, you go to HR to arbitrate it.

    These organizations are centralized. There is a governing body who sets the rules. If there is an ambiguity, the person who happens to be in power gets to decide how the ambiguity is resolved. Power is centralized in that governing body.

    These organizations are run by people. The governance of these organizations is enforced only to the extent that the human government carries out its duties.

    A decentralized autonomous organization is a group that can run with neither centralized nor human intervention. It is decentralized and autonomous. It is a DAO.

    Aragon is a platform for running and managing decentralized autonomous organizations. Luis Cuende is the founder of Aragon, and joins the show to explain what a DAO is and why people want to create them. We also talk about the engineering of Aragon and the structure of its ICO—which raised $25m via token sale.

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    —Huffduffed by ykgoon

  4. Here’s One Big Reason Tesla Still Doesn’t Dominate Our Roads

    Despite tremendous advances over the last decade, electric cars have yet to go mainstream. Even once Tesla ramps up production of its Model 3 cars, one obstacle will remain: a lack of infrastructure lining America’s roads. This week on Decrypted, Bloomberg Technology’s Pia Gadkari dives deep into the companies, led by Tesla, that are trying to tackle this problem — by pouring millions of dollars into building a network of charging stations.

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    —Huffduffed by ykgoon

  5. How a Crisis Almost Derailed the Original iPhone

    The year is 2005, the company is Apple. The iPod is a smash hit, but then-CEO Steve Jobs decides it’s time to cannibalize the company’s star product with a gamble: a smartphone. A decade after those phones reached the hands of the first consumers and changed the history of computing, Bloomberg Technology’s Mark Gurman goes deep behind the scenes with the people who raced to get that original iPhone ready. On the eve of the product’s unveiling, a crisis almost derailed the entire project. Mark and Brad also discuss the various features that people can expect from the iPhone 8, which Apple’s set to announce next month.

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    —Huffduffed by ykgoon

  6. The Nuclear Tech Breakthrough That Could Make Oil Obsolete

    We hear a lot about the approaching end of the fossil fuel era. But as various companies work on wind and solar, there’s a group of scientists quietly working on another method of generating electricity, in the lab that once created the atomic bomb. This week, Bloomberg Technology’s Jing Cao visits the researchers who are smashing hydrogen atoms together in a process called nuclear fusion. They say they’re on the brink of a major milestone, but they face an age-old problem: not enough funding.

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    —Huffduffed by ykgoon

  7. A Lifelong Quest for Flying Cars Sparked Frenzy, Then Bankruptcy

    Silicon Valley currently has a serious case of flying car fever, but this isn’t the first time enthusiasm for these vehicles has gripped the industry. This week, Bloomberg Technology’s Alistair Barr and Aki Ito visit the man who’s spent his entire life trying to turn his Jetson-like vision into reality. It’s a story of unwavering and maybe even irrational optimism that’s cost Paul Moller more than $100 million and led him to declare bankruptcy and face allegations of fraud.

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    —Huffduffed by ykgoon

  8. Could 3D Holograms Replace Your Computer Screen?

    A few months ago, a startup called Meta started clearing out the computer monitors that sat on employees’ desks — asking them to instead use the company’s augmented reality headsets, which overlay holograms on top of the real world. This week, Bloomberg Technology’s Selina Wang visits Meta to see how its workers have fared in this transition. Could desktop computers soon become as outdated as typewriters?

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    —Huffduffed by ykgoon

  9. Triangulation 306: Ali Almossawi: Bad Choices

    Ali Almossawi is the author of An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments. His latest book is Bad Choices: How Algorithms Can Help You Think Smarter and Live Happier. He talks with Leo Laporte about his unique style of explaining algorithms and algorithmic thinking.

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    —Huffduffed by ykgoon

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