wingload / tags / technology

Tagged with “technology” (9)

  1. On the Media: Our Future with Technology

    "As computers become smarter (and smaller), there’s a good chance that in the future, the lines between humans and computers will begin to blur. What does that mean for our essential humanness? Clive Thompson, Jamais Cascio, Jaron Lanier and Ray Kurzweil discuss a future where machines can think like humans and people become one with the web."

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  2. What Technology Wants

    Kevin Kelly, former executive editor of Wired magazine, discusses his brand-new view of technology, and explains how technology can give our lives greater meaning. In What Technology Wants he suggests that technology is a living, evolving organism that has its own unconscious needs and tendencies, and by aligning ourselves with the long-term imperatives of this near-living system, we can capture its full gifts.

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  3. TWiT Live Special: Live with Kevin Kelly

    Kevin Kelly talks to Leo Laporte and Tom Merritt about minimizing technology in our lives, and the next step in evolution, the Technium.

    Huffduffed from http://twit.tv/specials49

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  4. Videogaming as Literacy

    TV Ontario discussion on how videogaming is its own literacy and important to education.

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  5. How to be more effective online educator

    Roundtable discussion Teachers teaching teachers.

    http://teachersteachingteachers.org/

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  6. The Future of Work - Dr John Buchanan

    From http://sydney.edu.au/podcasts/2007/index.shtml The future of work is not what it used to be. As recently as the 1970s the prime concern was the coming of leisure society - how were we going to handle all the free time about to be delivered by "technological advances" like automation and computers? Far from facing problems of this nature we now have the reality of "over work" for some and unemployment for others. Can we expect more of the same in the future, or will the predictions of an earlier era ultimately come true? (Running time 71:56)

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  7. The New Hacker Generation

    Back in the days of yore, those of us of a certain (golden) age started our lives in computers with an ancient beige box which typically came pre-installed with BASIC. The old-school programming orientated environment gave many of us our first taste of programming, logic and an interest in our binary guzzling circuit-laden friends. Jono Bacon and Stuart ‘Aq’ Langridge explore this golden age of computing and how it arguably produced a generation of hackers and whether we should and could try and do the same with modern computers.

    From: http://shotofjaq.org/2010/03/the-new-hacker-generation/

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  8. Clay Shirky and Cognitive Surplus

    From Future Tense with John Moe:

    Sometimes at night I’ll wonder what’s on TV. Surf around for a while, not find much, and get on the computer instead. There, I might update Facebook, tweet something on Twitter. And I’ll think, “It didn’t use to be like this.” Time away from work and responsibility used to be passive, we watched TV mutely, we read a book. We didn’t post videos to YouTube or edit Wikipedia. Online culture has meant that instead of just consuming culture, we also create it and share it. We don’t just watch Lost, we watch it and then go on message boards or even make our own videos.

    This is a shift detailed in Clay Shirky’s new book Cognitive Surplus: creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age. He teaches at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU and has been a big thinker on the way we work together online for many many years. We talk to him about what this shift means for society in the long term.

    http://futuretense.publicradio.org/episode/index.php?id=686751198

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  9. iWoz: From Computer Geek to Cult Icon: How I Invented the Personal Computer, Co-Founded Apple, and Had Fun Doing It

    In 1975, a young engineering wizard, Steve Wozniak, created the first personal computer, the Apple I, and ignited the computer revolution. Ten years later, he received the National Medal of Technology, the highest honor bestowed upon American innovators. In 2000, he was inducted into the Inventors Hall of Fame and received the prestigious Heinz Award for Technology for ”single-handedly designing the first personal computer and for lighting the fires of excitement for education in grade school students and their teachers.”

    From: http://libwww.freelibrary.org/podcast/index.cfm?podcastID=190

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