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Tagged with “development” (12)

  1. Understanding the Web with Jeremy Keith | The Web Ahead

    But this email could only be from a bot because no person is actually going to say these things. When it’s internalized, why do I think it’s a reasonable thing that people would say this? Bringing it into the light diminishes the power. That’s why I really like this exercise of sketching out your inner critic.

    There were other things that were about getting your ideas out of your head and onto paper. Like mind maps. Really great stuff. It really encouraged people. People started to get into the mood for writing. I want to take an hour or two, literally lock people in a room and say, “We’re not leaving this room until you’ve written this blog post,” “We’re not leaving this room until you’ve written down that technique you’ve been talking about but haven’t written down.” Make them do it, but there’s a time limit. You have to do it now. It was a whole morning about getting over your inner critic, getting the ideas out of your head, and getting them down. But not really shaped. It’s more about getting them out of your head.

    I led the second morning, which was more about how you could shape them. That was a lot of fun. I’d never done this before but thought I’d give it a shot.

    I did something similar to what you were talking about: looking at other things, like film or theater, and asking, “How do they shape plot to make them more interesting?” If we could separate the plot from the narrative device, you could have a toolkit of narrative devices.

    First, I got them to take a story and give the plot in chronological form. For example, Star Wars, Little Red Riding Hood, or Jurassic Park. One point after another on Post-It notes. Then I took out a stack of cards. Each one had different narrative devices. For example: flashback. Find a crucial moment in the chronological plot and put that at the start and build up to it. Because that’s what happens in movies with flashbacks. Or backstory. Take a long zoom and put something into historical context. In 2001: A Space Odyssey, we begin with the dawn of man. In The Fellowship of the Ring, we have this huge thing from the first age before we even get to the hobbits in the Shire. Can you do that with the story you’ve got? It was a lot of fun. There was the distancing effect. What if you were to write a police report? There’s no embellishment or adjectives. Just the facts. That can have a powerful effect on a story. So they got dealt a random card. They didn’t get to choose. They had to take the story they already had — Star Wars or Jurassic Park or Little Red Riding Hood — and they had to use that device on it. Dialogue was another one. How can you tell a story where you don’t describe the action and you only have two characters describe the action to each other? Like The Breakfast Club. It was complete dialogue. They describe things but you don’t see it happening. They do this to their story, then we revisit what they’d done the day before, when it was about getting the stuff out of their head with brain dumps and mind maps. Now they’ve got their plot, the chronological part. Then I dealt them another random card and they had to apply that device to it. It became fun.

    http://thewebahead.net/110

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  2. ‘That pig was a good influence’ with Jeremy Keith and Jeffrey Zeldman | Unfinished Business

    Last week was Jeffrey Zeldman’s website’s 20th birthday, so this week he joins me and Jeremy Keith on Unfinished Business 110 to talk about the anniversary. We start by discussing Jeremy’s 100 words for 100 days writing project and how it’s inspired me to change the way that I think about writing on our blog and posting to our portfolio. We talk about the importance of writing for yourself as well as for others and why writing on your own website is important. With it being the twentieth anniversary of Jeffrey’s own site, we also talk about whether it’s important to archive older designs for posterity.

    http://www.unfinished.bz/110

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  3. #65: An Indie State of Mind | Release Notes

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    Today we reflect on the state of being indie, particularly in light of the discussion that we had last week with Jared Sinclair. We start, as every good argument should, by defining our terms and taking a look at what exactly we mean when we call someone “indie.” The conversation then turns to setting reasonable expectations for success, the non-financial benefits of being self-employed, and optimizing your life for freedom. We discuss the role of market and marketing in promoting App Store success, then close with our view of the App Store developer ecosystem and ways that new indies can give themselves the best shot of making it.

    Mailing List

    Every month there are more great articles and content about the business of Mac and iOS development than we have time to discuss on the show. If you’d like to receive our monthly newsletter with the best of these links, as well as a summary of past episodes, be sure to sign up for our mailing list at http://releasenotes.tv/mailinglist.

    Show Notes & Links

    Release Notes #64: Jared Sinclair

    Core Intuition #147: Back to Real Work – Manton Reece and Daniel Jalkut begin a really interesting discussion of what it takes to be successful in the App Store

    Core Intuition #148: A Little Bit of Peach Pie – Manton and Daniel conclude their discussion on finding success in the App Store

    http://releasenotes.tv/65-an-indie-state-of-mind/

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  4. The Web Holds Itself To Higher Standards With Jeremy Keith | The Breaking Development Podcast | Fresh Squeezed Mobile brought you by Breaking Development

    Fresh Squeezed Mobile is Breaking Development’s channel to get fresh ideas out there about mobile web development and design.

    http://fsm.bdconf.com/podcast/the-web-holds-itself-to-higher-standards-with-jeremy-keith

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  5. CSS for Grown Ups: Maturing Best Practices

    In the early days of CSS the web industry cut its teeth on blogs and small personal sites. Much of the methodology still considered best-practise today originated from the experiences of developers working alone, often on a single small style sheet, with few of the constraints that come from working with large distributed teams on large continually changing web projects.

    The mechanics of CSS are relatively simple. But creating large maintainable systems with it is still an unsolved problem. For larger sites, CSS is a difficult and complex component of the codebase to manage and maintain. It’s difficult to document patterns, and it’s difficult for developers unfamiliar with the code to contribute safely.

    How can we do better? What are the CSS best practises that are letting us down and that we must shake off? How can we take a more precise, structured, engineering-driven approach to writing CSS to keep it bug-free, performant, and most importantly, maintainable?

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP9410

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  6. HTML5 APIs Will Change the Web: And Your Designs

    HTML5. It’s more than paving the cowpaths. It’s more than markup. There’s a lot of stuff in the spec about databases and communication protocols and blahdiblah backend juju. Some of that stuff is pretty radical. And it will change how you design websites. Why? Because for the last twenty years, web designers have been creating inside of a certain set of constraints. We’ve been limited in what’s possible by the technology that runs the web. We became so used to those limits, we stopped thinking about them. They became invisible. They Just Are. Of course the web works this certain way. Of course a user clicks and waits, the page loads, like this… but guess what? That’s not what the web will look like in the future. The constrains have changed. Come hear a non-nerd explanation of the new possibilities created by HTML5’s APIs. Don’t just wait around to see how other people implement these technologies. Learn about HTML APIs yourself, so you can design for and create the web of the future.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP11512

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  7. Excessive Enhancement: JavaScript’s Dark Side

    Are we being seduced by the animation and rich UI capabilities of modern browsers at the expense of the underlying platform of the Web?

    The Web has entered a new phase in its evolution: The proliferation of a JavaScript enabled audience with increased processing grunt in their devices, better and more ambitious JavaScript developers, and users with an appetite for sophisticated experiences, all seem to be helping to move the web in a rich and exciting direction.

    Good developers understand about graceful degradation, progressive enhancement, unobtrusive JavaScript and the like, so why are we seeing big companies building web offerings with little apparent thought for their impact on the Web?

    We’ll explore this by looking at what the Web was, is now, and might become. We’ll look at examples of exciting user interfaces and sophisticated interactions. We’ll also examine some emerging techniques for providing rich user interactions without hurting the web or killing kittens.

    Phil Hawksworth, Technical Director, R/GA

    Phil began his career building web applications for financial institutions such as Commerzbank, Deutsche Bank, and the London Stock Exchange in the late nineties. A focus on web architectures and real-time data delivery lead Phil to a variety of web development roles with particular attention to emerging front-end development techniques and JavaScript application development.

    After several years working on web applications and consulting on web best practices at technology companies such as Verisign, VMware and BT, Phil made the move into the agency world where he managed development teams and architected solutions on projects for clients including of eBay, Sony and BP.

    Phil Hawksworth is a Technical Director at R/GA and enjoys talking about himself in the third person.

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  8. Ethan Marcotte on The Non-Breaking Space Show

    The Non-Breaking Space Show is a podcast by Christopher Schmitt, Dave McFarland, Chris Enns interviewing the best and brightest of the web.

    Ethan is a web designer & developer who lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

    He’s also the author several web design books including Responsive Web Design, a book that’s helped revolutionize the way websites are built.

    He frequently speaks on web standards and responsive web design at conferences and tweets about it @beep and @rwd.

    http://nonbreakingspace.tv/ethan-marcotte/

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