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whataboutmark / Mark

There are no people in whataboutmark’s collective.

Huffduffed (9)

  1. The Value Of Ruins

    Between The Alexandrian War of 48 BCE and the Muslim conquest of 642 CE, the Library of Alexandria, containing a million scrolls and tens of thousands of individual works was completely destroyed, its contents scattered and lost. An appreciable percentage of all human knowledge to that point in history was erased. Yet in his novella “The Congress”, Jorge Luis Borges wrote that “every few centuries, it’s necessary to burn the Library of Alexandria”.

    In his session James will ask if, as we build ourselves new structures of knowledge and certainty, as we design our future, should we be concerned with the value of our ruins?

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/james-bridle

    With a background in both computing and traditional publishing James Bridle attempts to bridge the gaps between technology and literature. He runs Bookkake, a small independent publisher and writes about books and the publishing industry at booktwo.org. In 2009 he helped launch Enhanced Editions, the first e-reading application with integrated audiobooks.

    —Huffduffed by whataboutmark

  2. Everything The Network Touches

    The work we’re collectively doing—opening up gradually all of human information and media, making it recombinable, helping people create and share their work—is a huge unspoken, sexy, world-redefining mission.

    It’s a mission that many of us have become blasé about, almost unaware of. It’s a project so large that it’s hard to get a grasp on. And the next few years are going to get even more interesting as the network pervades physical objects and environments, sensing and manifesting information in the real world.

    It’s time to recognise the scale of the project we have in front of us, the breadth of the material we have to work with, and the possibilities of design within it. All of human knowledge, creativity—even the planet itself—is our canvas.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/tom-coates

    Tom Coates is a technologist and writer, focused on the shape of the web to come and on developing new concepts that thrive in it. He’s worked for many prominent web companies including Time Out, the BBC and Yahoo! where he was Head of Product for the Brickhouse innovation team. He’s most known for the Fire Eagle location-sharing service, and for his work on social software, future media and the web of data.

    —Huffduffed by whataboutmark

  3. Kerning, Orgasms And Those Goddamned Japanese Toothpicks

    Freud popularised the term, “The Narcissism of Minor Differences”, to describe how adjacent villages—identical for all practical purposes—would struggle to amplify their tiniest distinctions in order to justify how much they despised one other. So you have to guess how much he would have enjoyed design mailing lists. And, Perl.

    Truth is, to the untrained (un-washed, un-nuanced, un-Paul-Rand’d, and un-Helvetica’d) outsider, discourse in the design community can sometimes look a lot like a cluster of tightly-wound Freudian villages.

    So, how is the role of design perceived by the people who are using the stuff you make? What role (if any) should users expect in the process of how their world is made and remade? What contexts might be useful in helping us turn all of our obsessions into useful and beautiful work?

    Can an Aeron chair ever be truly ‘Black’? Will there ever be a way to get Marketing people to stop calling typefaces ‘fonts’? And, when, at last, will the international community finally speak as one regarding the overuse of Mistral and stock photos of foreshortened Asian women?

    By leveraging his uniquely unqualified understanding of design, Merlin will propose some promising patterns for fording the gap between end-users and the unhappy-looking people in costly European eyeglasses who are designing their world.

    Is there hope? Come to Brighton, pull up a flawlessly-executed mid-century-Modern seating affordance, and we’ll see what we can figure out together. One village to another.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/merlin-mann

    Merlin Mann is best known as the creator of 43folders.com, a popular American website about finding the time and attention to do your best creative work.

    —Huffduffed by whataboutmark

  4. Program or be Programmed: Ten Commands for a Digital Age

    Doug Rushkoff, author of Life Inc.: How the World Became a Corporation and How to Take It Back, speaking at SXSW 2010.

    http://sxsw.com/node/4844

    —Huffduffed by whataboutmark

  5. Think Vitamin Interview: Dan Cederholm at FOWD London 2010

    First up is my chat with Dan Cederholm, designer, author and co-creator of one of the most popular design focused apps Dribbble. Thanks to Dan for taking the time to chat.

    —Huffduffed by whataboutmark

  6. Dribbble: Dan Cederholm and Rich Thornett

    The designer and developer of the Dribbble social design network talk about its implementation and the ideas behind it.

    —Huffduffed by whataboutmark

  7. How Prosperity Evolves

    With our economy a shambles and our environment threatened, is there any reason to be optimistic about the future? Matt Ridley says there’s scientific proof to say we should be.

    Here’s an article from Matt Ridley on the same subject: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703691804575254533386933138.html#printMode

    —Huffduffed by whataboutmark

  8. Web Directions @media: Jeremy Keith — Hot Topics

    Continuing a popular @media tradition, the final session for day one, hosted by Jeremy Keith, will feature a handful of speakers discussing questions posed by conference attendees. Wear your flak jacket: there will be controversy!

    Panelists:

    • John Allsopp
    • Hannah Donovan
    • Simon Willison
    • Christian Crumlish

    —Huffduffed by whataboutmark

  9. Mark Boulton — Designing grid systems

    Grid sys tems have been used in print design, archi tec ture and inte rior design for gen­er a tions. Now, on the web, the same rules of grid sys tem com po si tion and usage no longer apply. Content is viewed in many ways; from RSS feeds to email. Content is viewed on many devices; from mobile phones to lap tops. Users can manip u late the browser, they can remove con tent, resize the can vas, resize the type faces. A designer is no longer in con trol of this pre sen ta tion. So where do grid sys tems fit in to all that?

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/mark-boulton-designing-grid-systems/

    —Huffduffed by whataboutmark