vvelt / Victor Velt

Web designer at Yale University.

There are no people in vvelt’s collective.

Huffduffed (7)

  1. No Excuse: Web Designers Who Can’t Code

    Some of the most important design decisions happen in code. In 2009, I gave a talk at the Build conference in Belfast with what I thought was a fairly uncontroversial premise: web designers should write code. Since then, the subject has sparked more than a few debates, including a particular heated pile-on when Elliot Jay Stocks tweeted that he was "shocked that in 2010 I’m still coming across ‘web designers’ who can’t code their own designs. No excuse." In a recent interview, Jonathan Ive said "It’s very hard to learn about materials academically, by reading about them or watching videos about them; the only way you truly understand a material is by making things with it." He’s talking about product design, but the principle is just as relevant to the Web (if not more so). "The best design explicitly acknowledges that you cannot disconnect the form from the material—the material informs the form…. Because when an object’s materials, the materials’ processes and the form are all perfectly aligned…. People recognize that object as authentic and real in a very particular way." As our industry grows and roles get more specialized, it’s possible to become a "web designer" without more than a cursory understanding of the fundamental building materials of the Web: the code. Is this just the price of progress? Are the days of the web craftsman soon to be in the past? Or is a hybrid approach to web design and development something worth preserve?

    • Jenn Lukas
    • Ethan Marcotte
    • Ryan Sims
    • Wilson Miner

    —Huffduffed by vvelt

  2. Fun With The Lights Off: Interactivity Without Graphics

    The pictures are better on radio, they say, and the same is also true in interactive experiences: games, for example, are possible using sound that are more realistic and immersive than the most complex 3D polygon-fests. But we’re not talking soundtrack: we’re talking fundamental questions of user interface, augmented reality and game design in audio. We’re focusing on the development of Papa Sangre, a game in sound without graphics, and the world’s first real-time generative audio-only virtual world. On an iPhone. Papa Sangre was commissioned by 4IP as a game in which blind people might be able to kick the ass of sighted people. Its development has been an adventure, pushing the capacity of the iPhone to the limit. It’s been an extraordinary challenge to imagine the design of a game and world where your existence is entirely through sound and where technological constraints become a mother of invention. You walk with your thumbs through a binaural sound environment, where you hear both the monster snoring to your left and the crunch of chicken bones and squeaky toys underfoot that may wake it up and bring death upon you. It’s a fundamentally different experience of gameplay, continually present-tense, totally immersive and therefore visceral – it feels like it’s you out there. The panel will discuss the process, the constraints, the vision and the philosophy behind a radical new genre of game and what this generally reveals for good game and experience design.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/events/event_IAP7208

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  3. Designing Ideas, Not Objects

    More that ever, the design of things is driving change into markets, and defining the idea of what a company means to its constitueants. Today, you can’t just create something, make and deliver it, and then expect it do well. Products must be more than just a “thing”. They need to built off relevant ideas, and the story needs to be driven throughout the entire proposition in an authentic way. Though observations and work examples, designer RobertBrunner will talk about why the notion of "ideas, not objects" is so important now, and how he and his company have created products that embody this principle. Highlighted will be his work for Barnes and Noble, Polaroid, Fuego, and Beats by Dr. Dre.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/events/event_IAP000005

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    —Huffduffed by vvelt

  4. Design for Hackers: Reverse-Engineering Beauty

    There are plenty of tools and tips available for technically applying design to an application or website; but the classical fundamentals that make websites and products beautiful and engaging remain a mystery. David Kadavy - freelance designer to Silicon Valley clients such as oDesk, UserVoice, and PBworks - will provide a sneak preview of content from his book, "Design for Hackers: Reverse-Engineering Beauty." David will explain important differences to be aware of when choosing fonts, as well as present "all of the fonts you’ll ever need.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/events/event_IAP6261

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    —Huffduffed by vvelt