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vanderwal / Thomas Vander Wal

A guy who questions most everything with a first impression of, ‘this can’t be right’

There are twenty people in vanderwal’s collective.

Huffduffed (247)

  1. How profile information will power the AI of the digital workplace with Ephraim Freed

    In this episode, Jeremy Thake talks to Ephraim Freed about his experiences deploying advanced digital workplace solutions as a consultant. Ephraim discusses the importance of profile information based on a blog post he wrote earlier this year on the strategies around personalization in the digital workplace.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/hyperfishpodcast/how-profile-information-will-power-the-ai-of-the-digital-workplace-with-ephraim-freed
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 01 Nov 2017 14:32:47 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by vanderwal

  2. John Whalen on using brain science in design

    The O’Reilly Design Podcast: Designing for the “six minds,” the importance of talking like a human, and the future of predictive AI.In this week’s Design Podcast, I sit down with John Whalen, chief experience officer at 10 Pearls, a digital development company focused on mobile and web apps, enterprise solutions, cyber security, big data, IoT,  and cloud and dev ops. We talk about the “six minds” that underlie each human experience, why it’s important for designers to understand brain science, and what people really look for in a voice assistant.Here are some highlights:

    Why it’s important for product designers to understand how the brain works

    I think that by knowing a little bit more about the brain—what draws your attention, how you hold things in memory, how you make decisions, and how emotions can cloud those decisions…the constellation of all these different pieces helps us make sure we’re thinking like our audience and trying to discover their frame of…literally their frame of mind when they’re picking a product or service and using it.

    The “six minds” that underlie each human experience

    One is vision and attention. The second is memory and all your preconceived ideas and the ways you think the world works. The third is wayfinding—that’s your ability to move around in space, in this case, move around a virtual world. The fourth is language, so the ability to have different linguistic terms. Associated with that is the emotional content there. And, finally, all of that is in service of helping you make decisions and solve problems in your world.

    What we look for in a voice-based assistant

    We studied how a diverse group of people use Siri, Cortana, Alexa, and Google Assistant, and then we asked, "Well, which one would be your favorite to take home? Which was your personal preference?" A lot of people did pick Google Assistant, which made all kinds of sense because that one did the best at answering questions. But then the second most popular by a wide margin was Alexa from Amazon’s Echo—despite actually being the least successful at answering questions. So, that was intriguing to us and we kind of wondered why.

    It turns out that the folks who picked Google Assistant often described what they were looking for from these systems as things like, "I just want the answer fast, just the facts. Give me the answer; I just want to know what’s happening." And some of the people who preferred Alexa said things like, "Well, it answered the question the way I asked it." Or, "I like that I can converse back and forth with it. It makes me feel like I’m speaking to a human." So, there are really humanistic qualities they gravitated to with Alexa.   

    …We can’t just go out and test our systems to be “percent correct” accurate, we also need to think about this human component. I think that’s the thing I wasn’t necessarily expecting to find from our study. We were curious about this humanistic quality, but we didn’t know how important it was.

    How predictive should AI systems be…when does it become creepy?

    In our study, we asked questions like, “How much would you like this to know about you?” For example, Amazon knows how often you’ve bought toothpaste, so it could probably predict if you’re running low on toothpaste. It could ask on a random Tuesday, "Gosh, Nikki, would you like some more toothpaste?" And you’re thinking, "How did it know? And where is it looking? And did it have a camera? And who else is in the room?" There are mathematical models that can predict these things quite well.

    …There can be all kinds of ways that devices can augment your cognition—and we already do this; we’re already, in some ways, cyborgs, every time we use Google Maps or every time we Google a price to make a decision on choosing something. There are a lot of ways this works, and we are very comfortable with it now. Finding out the weather in advance is actually augmenting what we know, helping us make better decisions.

    It can keep doing this; it’s just that we’re not used to it doing it in space and time, and we’re not used to it being as predictive. We’re used to asking it a question and then receiving the answer as opposed to it anticipating that you might need an answer.

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/john-whalen-on-using-brain-science-in-design

    —Huffduffed by vanderwal

  3. ‘Jerry’s Brain’ (The Online Version) Has Been Going Strong for 20 Years | WCAI

    I don’t know about you, but my phone feels like an extension of my brain. I can’t commit to an appointment without checking my calendar. There are to-do

    http://capeandislands.org/post/jerrys-brain-online-version-has-been-going-strong-20-years#stream/0

    —Huffduffed by vanderwal

  4. Episode 14: Tom Voelk – Well, Don’t Tell the Kids!

    > Play Episode 14: Tom Voelk

    https://welldonttellthekids.com/2017/08/04/episode-14-tom-voelk/

    download

    Tagged with tom voelk

    —Huffduffed by vanderwal

  5. In Our Own Time 2 - The Internet of Things, with Russell Davies, Alexandra Deschamps-Sonsino, Matt Webb

    I posted a ‘podcast’ yesterday. Here it is again. And here are some links and pictures of the things we talked about. And a couple of things we should have. Alex is here. Matt blogs here. Alex does IOT London….

    http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2015/06/podcast-notes.html

    —Huffduffed by vanderwal

  6. Russell Davies: IOT - In Our Own Time

    Nine years ago me and a couple of friends recorded the first episode of In Our Own Time about Buffy the Vampire Slayer. And now it’s time for episode two. This one’s about the Internet of Things and it features…

    http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2015/06/iot-in-our-own-time.html

    —Huffduffed by vanderwal

  7. Tom Coates on conversational devices

    The O’Reilly Bots Podcast: Conversational interfaces for the Internet of Things.

    In this episode of the O’Reilly Bots Podcast, I speak with Tom Coates, co-founder of Thington, a service layer for the Internet of Things. Thington provides a conversational, messaging-like interface for controlling devices like lights and thermostats, but it’s also conversational at a deeper level: its very architecture treats the interactions between different devices like a conversation, allowing devices to make announcements to any other device that cares to listen.Coates explains how Thington operates in a way analogous to social media; in fact, he calls it “a Twitter for devices.” Just as people engage with each other in a commons, devices chat with each other in Thington’s messaging commons. He also discusses the value of human-readable output and the challenges involved in writing human-understandable scripts.

    Other links:

    Coates’ blog post “The Shape of Things,” an overview of how connected devices will communicate with humans

    Google Translate’s interlingua

    The O’Reilly Artificial Intelligence conference, June 27-29, 2017, in New York

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/tom-coates-on-conversational-devices

    —Huffduffed by vanderwal

  8. E43 Pt 2 | Matthew Schutte on Ideas Grow Better in Community

    Matthew Schutte is the Co-Founder of Collaborative Advantage and a member of The Meta Currency Project.  The Meta Currency Project is focused on rethinking the foundation of the internet and how it is approached.  Matthew is also a political philosopher, privacy advocate, and most importantly a dedicated surfer. In part two of this episode Matthew shares how The Meta Currency Project is reshaping the internet, his company Collaborative Advantage, and he answers our rapid fire questions.  Topics covered in this episode: Measuring what matters, Creating the soil for growth, Ideas grow better with people, Educated but deprived of wisdom, All you need to have community is communication, and so much more. The biggest bang for buck that you can get in terms of innovation is an improvement on your ability to collaborate.  - Matthew Schutte Meta Currency Project: http://metacurrency.org/ Website: http://matthewschutte.com/ Collaborative Advantage: http://caplay.org/ or http://calabs.org/

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/user-247885009/e43-pt-2-matthew-schutte-on
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 03 Aug 2017 16:37:06 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by vanderwal

  9. E43 | Matthew Schutte on the Evolution of Community, Economy, and the Internet

    Matthew Schutte is the Co-Founder of Collaborative Advantage and a member of The Meta Currency Project.  The Meta Currency Project is focused on rethinking the foundation of the internet and how it is approached.  Matthew is also a political philosopher, privacy advocate, and most importantly a dedicated surfer. In part one of this episode Matthew shares how The Meta Currency Project is reshaping the internet along with addressing the issues of community, privacy, and the economy.  Their tools are truly open-sourcing the next economy. Topics covered in this episode: Seeing what’s possible, Structures for technology, Generation and Curation, Diversity, The evolution of community, How nature impacts technology, and how communication is the key to thriving. We are fragile because of the fear of failure.  - Matthew Schutte Meta Currency Project: http://metacurrency.org/ Website: http://matthewschutte.com/ Collaborative Advantage: http://caplay.org/ or http://calabs.org/

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/user-247885009/ep-43-matthew-schutte-on-the
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 03 Aug 2017 16:36:02 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by vanderwal

  10. Episode 72: The Athletic’s Tim Kawakami

    On this episode of "Posting Up," Tim Kawakami talked about a busy offseason for the Golden State Warriors and the thinking behind his decision to leave newspapers behind to join The Athletic’s newest site based around Bay Area sports.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/washington-post/episode-72-the-athletics-tim
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 31 Jul 2017 15:01:53 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by vanderwal

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