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unaffectedscorn / collective / tags / science fiction

Tagged with “science fiction” (255)

  1. Neal Stephenson, “Seveneves”

    Neil Stephenson’s novels, including The Baroque Trilogy and Reamde, are a dazzling blend of imagination and science, philosophy and history. His new novel, SEVENEVES, starts with the end of the world. This epic follows the descendants of the exiled Earthlings to their new outpost at the far reaches of the cosmos. The population grows, divides into seven races and ultimately returns to the long-abandoned home, which is unlike anything they have previously experienced.

    Founded by Carla Cohen and Barbara Meade in 1984, Politics & Prose Bookstore is Washington, D.C.’s premier independent bookstore and cultural hub, a gathering place for people interested in reading and discussing books. Politics & Prose offers superior service, unusual book choices, and a haven for book lovers in the store and online. Visit them on the web at http://www.politics-prose.com/

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    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 25 Jul 2016 21:27:07 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  2. Think Culture Is a Space Opera? Nah, It’s a Trojan Horse | WIRED

    In the latest ‘Geeks’ Guide to the Galaxy’ podcast, Simone Caroti discusses his critical survey of the Culture series by sci-fi author Iain Banks.

    http://www.wired.com/2016/06/geeks-guide-iain-banks/

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  3. Ep. 132 - Alien Commentary

    Collective Commentaries is a series in which we chat with a guest as we watch some of our favorite films. Watch along with us in our inaugural episode, as past guest and good friend of the show Gavin Rothery joins us to discuss Ridley Scott’s masterpiece Alien.

    Buy Alien (Theatrical Cut) here: http://amzn.to/28JKXX9

    If you enjoyed this commentary, please let us know on Facebook, Twitter, or over email! We’d love to hear from you.

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    The Collective Newsletter: http://www.thecollectivepodcast.com/newsletter

    Subscribe on iTunes: http://www.thecollectivepodcast.com/itunes Subscribe via RSS: http://www.thecollectivepodcast.com/rss Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thecollectivepodcast Follow us on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/thecpodcast

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    The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are solely those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect the views of their employers.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/the-collective-podcast/ep-132-alien-commentary
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  4. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Arthur C Clarke

    Roy Plomley’s castaway is science fiction writer Arthur C Clarke.

    Favourite track: Violin Concerto in B Minor by Edward Elgar

    Book: The Golden Treasury by Francis Palgrave

    Luxury: Solar-powered transistor radio

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p009mzgs

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  5. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Margaret Atwood

    Sue Lawley’s castaway this week is the writer Margaret Atwood. Born just after the outbreak of the Second World War, Margaret Atwood spent much of her childhood in the Canadian outback where her father’s work involved studying insects. She grew up mostly without television, cinema, mains electricity or even a proper road to civilisation. For company she had only her parents and her brother, with whom she wrote "serials, mainly about space travel".

    It wasn’t until her teens that the urge to write struck seriously, an event she describes as "a large, invisible thumb descended from the sky and pressed down on the top of my head. A poem formed." After University, a spell in England and a period teaching early morning classes to engineering students she had her first novel, The Edible Woman, published. Since then she has written nine more novels, four of which were Booker nominated with The Blind Assassin finally winning in 2000. Three of those novels have been made into films: Surfacing, The Handmaid’s Tale and The Blind Assassin. She has also published some dozen books of poetry, five collections of short stories, four books for children and assorted non-fiction titles. Her latest novel, Oryx and Crake, set in a genetically engineered, post-apocalyptic landscape is published on May 5th this year.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00937l3

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  6. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Brian Aldiss

    Roy Plomley’s castaway is novelist and critic Brian Aldiss.

    Favourite track: Sonata In A by Franz Schubert

    Book: Rasselas by Dr Samuel Johnson

    Luxury: Time machine

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p009mksv

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  7. Russell Hoban meets the Guardian book club

    The author of Riddley Walker explains to Professor John Mullan how following the ‘hobo journeys’ of his mind led him to his troubling vision of the future.

    Speculating about why readers are drawn to stories as painful as his account of the pinched, raw existence in the wake of a future nuclear catastrophe, Russell Hoban explains to his audience that "people like to read about people in the last extremity of nothing left".

    His own engagement with the material, as he explains, came about rather more accidentally after an unplanned visit to Canterbury Cathedral that set his mind off on "one of its hobo journeys" that mysteriously deliver him his plots.

    Riddley Walker is remarkable for its reimagining of English in the wake of a collapse of civilisation, and similarly Hoban says that this was not how he started out: "I began in straight English and left it behind", discovering a new tongue that "is an active character and fed me things I wouldn’t otherwise have thought of" including the character of Riddley.

    Unusually for a book club guest, Hoban is accompanied by one of his characters, in this case Mr Punch, who features in the novel as "the absolutely lawless force that wants what it wants immediately", but is fortunately on pretty restrained form for the occasion.

    http://www.theguardian.com/books/audio/2010/nov/29/russell-hoban-guardian-book-club

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  8. 291: I Like Complicated Books, Glenn

    "Aurora" and "Luna: New Moon" - Our Book Club returns to read two recent, highly praised science fiction novels. From Kim Stanley Robinson comes “Aurora,” the story of a spaceship sent from Earth to a far-off star in a trip that will take generations. And from Ian McDonald comes “Luna: New Moon,” a sort of “Dallas” (or is it “The Godfather”?) set on and under the surface of the moon. Plus, what else are we reading?

    Host Jason Snell with Scott McNulty, Aleen Simms, Erika Ensign and Glenn Fleishman.

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  9. A science fiction writer from the Soviet Union found the secret to time-travel | Public Radio International

    If you think about what life will be like in say, five to ten years, you can alter the course of history. That’s what Genrich Altshuller may have done.

    http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-03-10/science-fiction-writer-soviet-union-found-secret-time-travel

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  10. BBC Radio 3 - Sound of Cinema, British Sci-Fi from the BFI Days of Fear and Wonder

    Matthew Sweet is joined by Oscar-winning composer Steven Price for a review of music written for British Sci Fi films, recorded on London’s South Bank as part of the BFI Sci Fi Festival -"Days of Fear and Wonder".

    Matthew and Steve begin their survey with Arthur Bliss’s famous score for the HG Well’s inspired film "Things To Come". They look at the work of James Bernard and Tristram Cary for the Quatermass films and reflect on scores for "The First Men In The Moon"; "2001 - A Space Odyssey"; "Alien"; "Brazil"; "Flash Gordon" "The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy"; "Sunshine"; "Inception"; "Under The Skin" and "Gravity".

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04t91rq

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