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unaffectedscorn / collective / tags / science fiction

Tagged with “science fiction” (273)

  1. The Incomparable | Panspermia, but for Clothes (Episode 328)

    We deconstruct and reconstruct the recent release “Arrival,” staring Amy Adams, Jeremy Renner, and Forest Whitaker, and based on a story by Ted Chiang that we discussed nearly 300 episodes ago. There’s praise for the story’s restraint, quiet tone, beautiful scenes of solitary obelisks in remote cow pastures, and realistic portrayal of its main characters. We also enter a spirited debate about the film’s sci-fi plot mechanism, the way its aliens (and alien language) are portrayed, and the morality of a choice that one character may—or may not—have made.

    https://www.theincomparable.com/theincomparable/328/

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  2. The Incomparable | He’s More Man than Puppet (Episode 329)

    As a new “Star Wars” movie nears its release, we turn our attention to some of our least favorite features of this franchise we love. Our panelists draft our least favorite Special Edition changes, retcons, Original Trilogy and “Force Awakens” elements, and more. Plus we each pitch a new “Star Wars” movie that can right a wrong in the existing canon.

    https://www.theincomparable.com/theincomparable/329/

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  3. Kim Stanley Robinson

    Award-winning science fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson does exactly that in many of his works. In this episode of Generation Anthropocene, producer Mike Osborne sits down with Robinson to talk about his creative process and environmental thinking, what makes for good science fiction, and the genre’s capacity to imagine future societies shaped by climate change.

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  4. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, William Gibson

    This week the castaway on Desert Island Discs is William Gibson. Long before the existence of the Internet, he wrote about ‘cyberspace’, a boundless world reached only through computers. External space travel, to the Moon and Mars, had become old hat. By creating internal space, he breathed new life into science fiction. In conversation with Sue Lawley, he talks about his life and work and chooses eight records to take to the mythical island.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00941v7

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  5. 57: Ubik

    THRILL as stock genre trappings warp and mutate under the power of weird genius! MARVEL as brains-in-a-vat reality paranoia crosses over into theology and metaphysics! WONDER as interplanetary travel and communication with the dead are outstripped in strangeness by the mysteries of…The Commodity Form!

    The Sometime Seminar discusses the metaphysical science-fiction novel Ubik (1969) by Philip K. Dick.

    http://thesometime.com/seminar/57-ubik/

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  6. 42: The Southern Reach Trilogy

    How many forms of uncanny weirdness can you cram into one trilogy? Can the Netflix model of binge consumption work for novels as well as TV shows? And should you settle for a mystery when you could have a mythos?

    The Sometime Seminar discusses Jeff VanderMeer’s just-completed Southern Reach Trilogy of short weird/horror novels: Annihilation, Authority, and Acceptance (all 2014).

    http://thesometime.com/seminar/42-the-southern-reach-trilogy/

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  7. 25: Inverted World

    The Sometime Seminar discusses Inverted World, an early (1974) work of science fiction by Christopher Priest, along with his more recent writing about the genre.

    http://thesometime.com/seminar/25-inverted-world/

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  8. 16: The Bigendian Trilogy

    Improbably cool heroes investigate implausibly cool mysteries at the behest of impossibly cool billionaires! Is cool-obsession just another form of geekiness?

    This episode of The Sometime Seminar discusses the novels of William Gibson’s “Bigendian Trilogy” or “Blue Ant Trilogy”: Pattern Recognition (2003), Spook Country (2007), and Zero History (2010).

    http://thesometime.com/seminar/16-the-bigendian-trilogy/

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  9. 8: Embassytown

    You got semiotics in my space opera! You got space opera in my semiotics! lightbulb This episode of The Sometime Seminar discusses China Miéville’s 2011 science-fiction novel Embassytown, a space opera informed by Walter Benjamin and the philosophy of language.

    http://thesometime.com/seminar/8-embassytown/

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  10. 1977

    It is a period of civil war. Rebel spaceships, striking from a hidden base, have won their first victory against the evil Galactic Empire … Before those words crawled up movie screens in May 1977, what did people think the future was going to look like? What did pop culture sound like on the eve of Star Wars? With Kurt Andersen, Annalee Newitz, Alyssa Rosenberg, and Chris Taylor. This is part I of a V part series. 

    http://www.imaginaryworldspodcast.org/1977.html

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