Tagged with “law” (48)

  1. Cory Doctorow on the fight for a configurable and free internet - O’Reilly Media

    On the current “tech lash”: Doctorow welcomes the tech lash we’re seeing, because “on the one hand, we’re very worried that a small coterie of unaccountable technologists can write code that changes the lives of billions of people for the worse. But it seems like the mainstream of the critique of that won’t, or can’t, contemplate the possibility that a small group of people might write code that would change people’s lives for the better. That may be the way, or part of the way, that we hold tech to account—by having our own tech, by seizing the means of information.”

    We do need to build a better web: He continues, arguing that there are “companies with a fair degree of impunity to just make ads more invasive, more surveillant, more crappy, and more dangerous. Gathering all that data and warehousing it means that you put it at risk of being breached or subpoenaed or in some other way commandeered and then used against the people who you are advertising to.”

    Go forth and learn from Larry Lessig: Harvard Law school professor and founder of the Creative Commons, Lessig is key here, as Doctorow references: “Larry says that the world is influenced by four forces: 1) code, what’s technologically possible, 2) law, what’s legally available, 3) norms, what’s socially acceptable, and 4) markets, what’s profitable.”

    How we build a better web: Cory makes a two-prong argument on how we build a better web, which starts with a way to “sort the sheep from the goats or the willing from the unwilling…1) we should always design computers that obey their users or owners when there’s a conflict between what that person wants and what some remote entity like, say, a government or a police force or an advertiser or whatever wants. 2) Part two is that it should always be legal to disclose defects in computers. So, if you discover that there’s a problem with a computer that other people rely on, you should be able to warn them even if the manufacturer would prefer that you not.”

    On privacy, data breaches, and a new business as usual: Doctorow opines that we’re not at a watershed moment because: “When the next crisis comes, it reaches an even higher peak. More people care about it and they care about it more intensely. When the crisis passes and the new normal asserts itself, it’s a new normal in which the crisis is more salient yet. That’s how we attain change.”

    The good and bad of technology in the long history of the internet: Doctorow says this is nothing new: "That consciousness has been there since the very beginning, really. No one founds a group like the Electronic Frontier Foundation because they think technology is going to automatically be great. The reason the Free Software Foundation and EFF and other projects try to think about the social implications and how technology could be made safer for human habitation is because of this dual sense that on the one hand, technology held an enormous power to change the balance in social justice struggles and to make people’s lives much better.

    "At the same time, it held an enormous power to make people’s lives much worse and change the balance of power so that it favored the already powerful. Technology has done both. If there’s a real criticism of the techlash it’s that it decides that only one of those things is real. They’re both real. Technology has given us community and it’s given us kindness and it’s given us all kinds of joys and human flourishing. It’s taken those away, too."

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/cory-doctorow-on-the-fight-for-a-configurable-and-free-internet

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  2. Episode 126: How Ann Boleyn gave us our right to privacy • DecodeDC

    What do Ann Boleyn and Henry VIII have to do with Roe v Wade and a right to privacy?

    http://www.decodedc.com/126/

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  3. Cory Doctorow on losing the open Web

    The O’Reilly Hardware Podcast: Digital rights management goes deeper into the Web.In this episode of the Hardware podcast, we talk with writer and digital rights activist Cory Doctorow. He’s recently rejoined the Electronic Frontier Foundation to fight a World Wide Web Consortium proposal that would add DRM to the core specification for HTML. When we recorded this episode with Cory, the W3C had just overruled the EFF’s objection. The result, he says, is that “we are locking innovation out of the Web.”“It is illegal to report security vulnerabilities in a DRM,” Doctorow says. “[DRM] is making it illegal to tell people when the devices they depend upon for their very lives are unsuited for that purpose.”

    In our “Tools” segment, Doctorow tells us about tools that can be used for privacy and encryption, including the EFF surveillance self-defense kit, and Wickr, an encrypted messaging service that allows for an expiration date on shared messages and photos. “We need a tool that’s so easy your boss can use it,” he says.

    Other links:

    In 2014, Nest bought Revolv, maker of a smart home hub. Now Nest is shutting down Revolv’s cloud service, and in the process it’s bricking every Revolv hub that’s already been sold. Consumers may own their hardware, but if it depends on cloud software to run, it operates at someone else’s whim.

    Mark Klein, an AT&T technician who filed a whistleblower suit against AT&T for allowing the National Security Administration to tap into its lines.

    EFF’s Apollo 1201 project, aimed at eradicating DRM

    Simply Secure, a non-profit privacy and security organization of which Doctorow has recently joined the board

    DanKam, an augmented-reality application written by security researcher Dan Kaminsky that helps people who experience colorblindness. It’s an example of a legitimate project that requires the ability to break DRM.

    This week’s click spirals:

    David Cranor: The war among players in the online game Eve Online, including a recent economic insurrection by some players against the game runners.

    Jon Bruner: A game design competition based on Robert Caro’s classic biography The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York, about the legendary urban planner.

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/cory-doctorow-on-losing-the-open-web

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  4. Cory Doctorow: Podcast: Why it is not possible to regulate robots…

    Here’s a reading (MP3) of a my recent Guardian column, Why it is not possible to regulate robots, which discusses where and how robots can be regulated, and whether there is any sensible ground for “robot law” as distinct from “computer law.”

    http://mostlysignssomeportents.tumblr.com/post/119112072177/podcast-why-it-is-not-possible-to-regulate-robots

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  5. The Spirit of Flickr and the Problem of Intent - mor10.com

    Can we criticize Flickr for selling Creative Commons photos or is the problem more about how we understand licensing and value? Morten has opinions.

    http://mor10.com/spirit-flickr-problem-intent/comment-page-1/

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  6. Picking The Locks: Redefining Copyright Law In The Digital Age : NPR

    In his new book, Cory Doctorow shows creators how to survive in the digital age. He says the problem with copyright law is tech platforms have more control over content than the people who make it.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/11/03/360196476/picking-the-locks-redefining-copyright-law-in-the-digital-age

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  7. Anki robotics founder Boris Sofman on why it’s a small leap from zippy toys to self-drive cars

    This week on Tech Weekly with Aleks Krotoski we discuss the reasons behind a rush by the UK government to get new data laws on the statute before the summer recess of parliament. Aleks speaks to Jim Killock executive director of the Open Rights Group about the dangers of rushing such important legislation and why this might endanger our civil liberties and rights as consumers.

    Aleks is also joined by the Guardian tech team in the form of Samuel Gibbs and Shiona Tregaskis to discuss Amazon’s recent application in the US to test out its drone delivery system Prime Air and Guardian games editor Keith Stuart give his top five tips for those who have just returned to the world of gaming and are nervous about picking up a controller.

    Finally Guardian technology editor Charles Arthur meets Boris Sofman, founder of the robotics company Anki. Boris discusses the recent launch of his Anki Drive toy cars and why the technology running is not so different to the technology behind Google’s self-drive car.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2014/jul/16/anki-robotics-podcast

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  8. Cory Doctorow on intellectual property in a digital age

    In a keynote speech for The Literary Conference 2014, author and renowned digital publishing pioneer Cory Doctorow talks about his creative experiments on and offline, and addresses head-on the thorny question of ‘Intellectual Property in a Digital Age’.

    http://craphound.com/?p=5227

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  9. A conversation with Bruce Schneier - Software Freedom Law Center

    The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software.

    Join us at Columbia Law School as renowned security expert Bruce Schneier talks with Eben Moglen about what we can learn from the Snowden documents, the NSA’s efforts to weaken global cryptography, and how we can keep our own free software tools from being subverted.

    http://www.softwarefreedom.org/events/2013/a_conversation_with_bruce_schneier/

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  10. Neal Stephenson talks REAMDE with lawyers, security experts

    Here’s a video from a recent U Washington Law School panel discussion with Neal Stephenson regarding his video-game crime-thriller REAMDE. The law school assembled cyber lawyers, security experts from the computer science department, and Stephenson himself, and discussed the real-world implications for the sorts of business, technology, security and crime described in the (excellent) book. This video would probably work better as an MP3 — there’s not much in the video track beyond a nearly static image of the panel — but the actual content is fascinating.

    http://boingboing.net/2012/10/24/neal-stephenson-talks-reamde-w.html

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