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Tagged with “book:author=cory doctorow” (54)

  1. Cory Doctorow on legally disabling DRM (for good)

    The O’Reilly Security Podcast: The chilling effects of DRM, nascent pro-security industries, and the narrative power of machines.In this episode, I talk with Cory Doctorow, a journalist, activist, and science fiction writer.

    We discuss the EFF lawsuit against the U.S. government, the prospect for a whole new industry of pro-security businesses, and the new W3C DRM specification.Here are some highlights from our discussion around DRM:

    How to sue the government: Taking on the DCMA

    We [Electronic Frontier Foundation] are representing [Bunny Huang and Matthew Green] in a case that challenges the constitutionality of Section 1201 of the DMCA. The DMCA is this notoriously complicated copyright law, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, that was brought in in 1998. Section 1201 is the part that relates to bypassing digital rights management (DRM), or digital restrictions management as some people call it. The law says that it’s against the rules to bypass this, even for lawful purposes, and that it imposes very severe civil and criminal penalties. There’s a $500,000 fine and a five-year prison sentence for a first offense provided for in the statute. The law’s been on the books, obviously, for a very long time—since 1998. Given that all digital technology works by making copies, it’s hard to imagine a digital technology that can’t be used to infringe copyright; no digital technology would be legal.

    Recent changes add urgency

    A couple things changed in the last decade. The first is that the kinds of technologies that have access controls for copyrighted works have gone from these narrow slices (consoles and DVD players) to everything (the car in your driveway). If it has an operating system or a networking stack, it has a copyrighted work in it. Software is copyrightable, and everything has software. Therefore, manufacturers can invoke the DMCA to defend anything they’ve stuck a thin scrim of DRM around, and that defense includes the ability to prevent people from making parts. All they need to do is add a little integrity check, like the ones that have been in printers for forever, that asks, "Is this part an original manufacturer’s part, or is it a third-party part?" Original manufacturer’s parts get used; third-party parts get refused. Because that check restricts access to a copyrighted work, bypassing it is potentially a felony. Car manufacturers use it to lock you into buying original parts.

    This is a live issue in a lot of domains. It’s in insulin pumps, it’s in voting machines, it’s in tractors. John Deere locks up the farm data that you generate when you drive your tractor around. If you want to use that data to find out about your soil density and automate your seed broadcasting, you have to buy that data back from John Deere in a bundle with seed from big agribusiness consortia like Monsanto, who license the data from Deere. This metastatic growth is another big change. It’s become really urgent to act now because, in addition to this consumer rights dimension, your ability to add things to your device, take it for independent service, add features, and reconfigure it are all subject to approval from manufacturers.

    How this impacts security

    All of this has become a no-go zone for security researchers. In the last summer, the Copyright Office entertained petitions for people who have been impacted by Section 1201 of the DMCA. Several security researchers filed a brief saying they had discovered grave defects in products as varied as voting machines, insulin pumps and cars, and they were told by their counsel that they couldn’t disclose because, in so doing, they would reveal information that might help someone bypass DRM, and thus would face felony prosecution and civil lawsuits.

    When copyright overrides the First Amendment

    There are some obvious problems with copyright and free speech. Copyright is a government monopoly over who can use certain combinations of words or pictures, or convey certain messages in specific language, all of which seems to conflict with First Amendment rights. In both the Eldred and Golan cases, the Supreme Court said the reason copyright is constitutional, the reason the First Amendment doesn’t trump copyright, is that copyright has these escape valves. One is fair use. The other is what’s called the traditional contours of copyright, which determine what is and isn’t copyrightable (i.e., copyright only covers expressions and not ideas, copyright doesn’t cover non-creative works, and so on). But the DRM situation is urgent. Because DRM can be used to restrict fair use, because it can trump the traditional contours, and because it has criminal penalties, we were able to bring a challenge against it. When there are criminal penalties, you don’t have to wait for someone to sue you. You can sue the government.

    Related resources:

    EFF is suing the US government to invalidate the DMCA’s DRM provisions (BoingBoing)

    America’s broken digital copyright law is about to be challenged in court (The Guardian)

    1201 complaint in full

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/cory-doctorow-on-legally-disabling-drm-for-good

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  2. Keynote: Cory Doctorow: How Stupid Laws and Benevolent Dictators can Ruin the Decentralized Web, too

    Cory Doctorow, is an author, journalist, and Special Advisor at the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

    In this keynote, Cory explains how the people who founded the web with the idea of having an open, decentralized system ended up building a system that is increasingly monopolized by a few companies — and how we can prevent the same things from happening next time.

    https://archive.org/details/DWebSummit2016_Keynote_Cory_Doctorow

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  3. Cory Doctorow on losing the open Web

    The O’Reilly Hardware Podcast: Digital rights management goes deeper into the Web.In this episode of the Hardware podcast, we talk with writer and digital rights activist Cory Doctorow. He’s recently rejoined the Electronic Frontier Foundation to fight a World Wide Web Consortium proposal that would add DRM to the core specification for HTML. When we recorded this episode with Cory, the W3C had just overruled the EFF’s objection. The result, he says, is that “we are locking innovation out of the Web.”“It is illegal to report security vulnerabilities in a DRM,” Doctorow says. “[DRM] is making it illegal to tell people when the devices they depend upon for their very lives are unsuited for that purpose.”

    In our “Tools” segment, Doctorow tells us about tools that can be used for privacy and encryption, including the EFF surveillance self-defense kit, and Wickr, an encrypted messaging service that allows for an expiration date on shared messages and photos. “We need a tool that’s so easy your boss can use it,” he says.

    Other links:

    In 2014, Nest bought Revolv, maker of a smart home hub. Now Nest is shutting down Revolv’s cloud service, and in the process it’s bricking every Revolv hub that’s already been sold. Consumers may own their hardware, but if it depends on cloud software to run, it operates at someone else’s whim.

    Mark Klein, an AT&T technician who filed a whistleblower suit against AT&T for allowing the National Security Administration to tap into its lines.

    EFF’s Apollo 1201 project, aimed at eradicating DRM

    Simply Secure, a non-profit privacy and security organization of which Doctorow has recently joined the board

    DanKam, an augmented-reality application written by security researcher Dan Kaminsky that helps people who experience colorblindness. It’s an example of a legitimate project that requires the ability to break DRM.

    This week’s click spirals:

    David Cranor: The war among players in the online game Eve Online, including a recent economic insurrection by some players against the game runners.

    Jon Bruner: A game design competition based on Robert Caro’s classic biography The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York, about the legendary urban planner.

    https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/cory-doctorow-on-losing-the-open-web

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  4. Authors@Google: Cory Doctorow & Charles Stross | “The Rapture of Nerds”

    Cory Doctorow and Charles Stross have just signed with Tor Books to co-author a fix-up novel based on a series of short stories called Rapture of the Nerds. The authors and their editor told us what to expect:

    Cory and Charlie intend to write a third novella in the sequence begun with "Jury Service" and "Appeals Court," and THE RAPTURE OF THE NERDS will consist of all three novellas, possibly with some small additional connective tissue if necessary.

    Many distinguished SF "novels" have actually been stitched together from short-fiction serieses like this; the venerable industry term for such a book is "fix-up", which doesn’t imply anything deprecatory.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viisMOc1iic
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  5. Cory Doctorow: Podcast: Why it is not possible to regulate robots…

    Here’s a reading (MP3) of a my recent Guardian column, Why it is not possible to regulate robots, which discusses where and how robots can be regulated, and whether there is any sensible ground for “robot law” as distinct from “computer law.”

    http://mostlysignssomeportents.tumblr.com/post/119112072177/podcast-why-it-is-not-possible-to-regulate-robots

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  6. re:publica 2015 - Cory Doctorow: The NSA are not the Stasi: Godwin for mass surveillance

    Find out more at: http://re-publica.de/session/nsa-are-not-stasi-godwin-mass-surveillance

    It’s tempting to compare NSA mass surveillance to the GDR’s notorious Stasi, but the differences are more illuminating than the similarities.

    Cory Doctorow Electronic Frontier Foundation

    Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Germany (CC BY-SA 3.0 DE)

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8Q0Mme33bM
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Cory Doctorow, “Information Doesn’t Want to be Free” – The Command Line

    This is an episode of The Command Line Podcast.

    In this episode, I interview Cory Doctorow about his latest book, “Information Doesn’t Want to be Free: Laws for the Internet Age.” If you are interested in learning more about the topics we discuss and that book covers, you can also check out books by the scholars we mention: Lawrence Lessig, James Boyle and William Patry. I compared Cory’s book to “The Indie Band Survival Guide” the authors of which are friends of the show whom I have also interviewed.

    The audiobook version of the book is already available. Check Cory’s site, the free download and electronic editions should be available soon.

    http://thecommandline.net/2014/12/13/info_doesnt_want/

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  8. Picking The Locks: Redefining Copyright Law In The Digital Age : NPR

    In his new book, Cory Doctorow shows creators how to survive in the digital age. He says the problem with copyright law is tech platforms have more control over content than the people who make it.

    http://www.npr.org/2014/11/03/360196476/picking-the-locks-redefining-copyright-law-in-the-digital-age

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  9. News from the future for Wired UK

    Here’s a reading of a short story I wrote for the July, 2014 issue of Wired UK in the form of a news dispatch from the year 2024 — specifically, a parliamentary sketch from a raucous Prime Minister’s Question Time where a desperate issue of computer security rears its head:

    Quick: what do all of these have in common: your gran’s cochlear implant, the Whatsapp stack, the Zipcar by your flat, the Co-Op’s 3D printing kiosk, a Boots dispensary, your Virgin thermostat, a set of Tata artificial legs, and cheap heads-up goggles that come free with a Mister Men game?

    If you’re stumped, you’re not alone. But Prime Minister Lane Fox had no trouble drawing a line around them today during PMQs in a moment that blindsided the Lab-Con coalition leader Jon Cruddas, who’d asked about the Princess Sophia hacking affair. Seasoned Whitehall watchers might reasonably have expected the PM to be defensive, after a group of still-anonymous hackers captured video, audio and sensitive personal communications by hijacking the Princess’s home network. The fingerpointing from GCHQ and MI6 has been good for headlines, and no one would have been surprised to hear the PM give the security services a bollocking, in Westminster’s age-old tradition of blame-passing.

    Nothing of the sort. Though the PM leaned heavily on her cane as she rose, she seemed to double in stature as she spoke, eyes glinting and her free hand thumping the Dispatch Box: "The Princess Sophia affair is the latest installment in a decades-old policy failure that weakened the security of computer users to the benefit of powerful corporations and our security services. This policy, the so-called ‘anti-circumvention’ rules, have no place in an information society.

    http://craphound.com/?p=5241

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  10. Cory Doctorow on intellectual property in a digital age

    In a keynote speech for The Literary Conference 2014, author and renowned digital publishing pioneer Cory Doctorow talks about his creative experiments on and offline, and addresses head-on the thorny question of ‘Intellectual Property in a Digital Age’.

    http://craphound.com/?p=5227

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