tobestobs / tags / brighton

Tagged with “brighton” (6)

  1. Information architecture patterns

    We have patterns for buildings, patterns for interaction design, and patterns for software development. But are there patterns for information architecture? Of course there are - patterns emerge from use, and there certainly are enough information architectures around to identify a set of patterns.This presentation will describe a wide range of commonly-used information architecture patterns, including hierarchies small and large, different types of database structure, hypertext, subsite models, sites with multiple entry points and ways of combining these. For each Donna will describe the core elements of the pattern, discuss the most appropriate uses and show real-world examples. Understanding the different patterns will help attendees to select the most appropriate structures for their content.

    —Huffduffed by tobestobs

  2. What Is the Shape of the Future Book?

    We will always debate: the quality of the paper, the pixel density of the display; the cloth used on covers, the interface for highlighting; location by page, location by paragraph.

    This is not what matters. Surface is secondary.

    What are the core systems comprising the future book? What are the tools that need to be built?

    As designers we will need to provide the scaffolding for these systems. The interfaces for these tools. Not just as surface, but holistically—understanding the shifting of emotional space, the import of the artifact, the evocation of a souvenir, digitally.

    How will we surface the myriad data just below the words of digital books in organic, clean and deliberately designed ways? How will we shape the future book?

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/craig-mod

    Craig Mod is a writer, designer and publisher concerned with the future of books, publishing, and storytelling. He lives in a tiny Bay Area village in the California full of dreamers, endless yogurt, and trees that let loose money when shaken just so. His writing appears mainly on his website, but has also appeared in the New Scientist, The New York Times, and A List Apart. He works as a designer for Flipboard.

    —Huffduffed by tobestobs

  3. Facing up to Fonts

    Browser support for the typographical aspects of CSS is gradually increasing. Things are on the up.

    Richard will be trouncing the myth of web-safe fonts, demonstrating how to go beyond bold, detailing the technicalities of font embedding and exploring the commercial and ethical minefield therein.

    The introduction of font embedding in particular is a long-awaited step in the right direction. However it brings with it a host of complications; technical, ethical and aesthetic.

    This session will explain all.

    —Huffduffed by tobestobs

  4. 80% Science, 20% Art

    Web typography is a toddler in the big bad world of competing displays, browsers and operating systems. Jon takes it by the hand, and discusses the science that comes before the art.

    It’ll be a celebration with lots of opportunity for questions and discourse. From exploring how fonts are rendered, to a quick refresher on typesetting and with a little history thrown in for good measure, it’s time to get your glyph on!

    —Huffduffed by tobestobs

  5. Make It So: Learning From SciFi Interfaces by Nathan Shedroff and Chris Noessel

    Make It So explores how science fiction and interface design relate to each other. The authors have developed a model that traces lines of influence between the two, and use this as a scaffold to investigate how the depiction of technologies evolve over time, how fictional interfaces influence those in the real world, and what lessons interface designers can learn through this process. This investigation of science fiction television shows and movies has yielded practical lessons that apply to online, social, mobile, and other media interfaces.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/nathanshedroff/

    Nathan Shedroff is the chair of the ground-breaking MBA in Design Strategy at California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco, CA. This program melds the unique principles that design offers business strategy with a vision of the future of business as sustainable, meaningful, and truly innovative — as well as profitable.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/chrisnoessel/

    Chris Noessel is an interaction designer and self-described “nomothete” (ask him directly about that one.) In his day job as a consultant with Cooper, he designs products, services, and strategy for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and software.

    —Huffduffed by tobestobs

  6. What’s Next? How Mobile is Changing Design by Brian Fling

    Mobile is evolving, the web is adapting, and these two colossal worlds are about to collide to create something new. In order to design the experiences of this new contextual web, we need to change the way we look at design. In this talk Brian will provide his insights on some of the emerging trends in mobile design and share his thoughts on how we will design the interfaces of tomorrow.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/brianfling/

    Brian Fling has been a leader in creating interactive experiences for both the web and mobile mediums. He has worked with hundreds of businesses from early stage start-ups to Fortune 50 companies to leverage new media around the needs of real peoples.

    —Huffduffed by tobestobs