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tkadlec / Tim Kadlec

There are two people in tkadlec’s collective.

Huffduffed (237)

  1. Episode 40: Jessy Irwin

    Jessy is a security expert who excels in translating complex cybersecurity issues into simple, relatable terms for non-technical audiences. In her work as a consultant, security executive, and former Security Empress at 1Password, she’s taught consumers how to better protect themselves, their data and their identities online. 

    Jessy is currently making security more accessible for the average person. In 2017, she was named one of the Top 20 Women in Cybersecurity by Cyberscoop.

    Jurassic Park (DVD) 

    Jessy on Twitter – @jessysaurusrex 

    Don’t forget, to get in touch with me either try the contact page of the site or follow me on Twitter, where I can be found at @Jenny_Radcliffe

    http://jennyradcliffe.com/episode-40-jessy-irwin/

    —Huffduffed by tkadlec

  2. Thomas Thwaites: How I built a toaster — from scratch | TED Talk | TED.com

    It takes an entire civilization to build a toaster. Designer Thomas Thwaites found out the hard way, by attempting to build one from scratch: mining ore for steel, deriving plastic from oil … it’s frankly amazing he got as far as he got. A parable of our interconnected society, for designers and consumers alike.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/thomas_thwaites_how_i_built_a_toaster_from_scratch?language=en

    —Huffduffed by tkadlec

  3. Midnight in Karachi Episode 12: Emily St. John Mandel | Tor.com

    Welcome back to Midnight in Karachi, a bi-weekly podcast about writers, publishers, editors, illustrators, their books and the worlds they create, hosted by Mahvesh Murad.

    This week, Clarke award winner Emily St. John Mandel joins Mahvesh to talk about Station Eleven, which bits of the apocalypse interest her, Shakespeare, and reading voraciously as a child. And on the Under the Radar segment, Mahvesh speaks with Will Wiles, writer of the acclaimed Care of Wooden Floors and the Kitschie nominated The Way Inn about the modern gothic, creepy hotels and Ballard.

    http://www.tor.com/2015/05/07/midnight-in-karachi-episode-12-emily-st-john-mandel/

    —Huffduffed by tkadlec

  4. 099 - Austin Kleon on Creative Community & More

    Today on the show we have the brilliant Austin Kleon!

    Austin is a bestselling writer and artist. You might know him from the books Newspaper Blackout, Steal Like an Artist or Share Your Work.

    Today on the show we talk about being part of a creative community, art school, location and more!

    Austin was so generous with his time and wisdom, you are going to love this!

    Apply to the CPT MFBA Online Program www.creativepeptalk.com/mfba

    Show Notes Austin Kleon http://austinkleon.com/

    Moomin Comics https://www.drawnandquarterly.com/moomin-book-one

    Nancy Strips http://nancyandsluggo.com/

    Bruce Eric Kaplan http://bruceerickaplan.com/

    Public School http://gotopublicschool.com/

    Bill Cunningham New York https://www.amazon.com/Bill-Cunningham-York-Anna-Wintour/dp/B0050I975Q

    John Maeda Talk (Paul Rand Quote) http://www.fastcodesign.com/3036833/innovation-by-design/ex-risd-president-john-maeda-to-designers-make-lots-of-money

    Hugh MacLeoud - Ignore Everybody https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0026NBZFI/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/creativepeptalk/099-austin-kleon-on-creative-community-more
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 06 Aug 2016 15:03:17 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by tkadlec

  5. 099 - Austin Kleon on Creative Community & More

    Today on the show we have the brilliant Austin Kleon!

    Austin is a bestselling writer and artist. You might know him from the books Newspaper Blackout, Steal Like an Artist or Share Your Work.

    Today on the show we talk about being part of a creative community, art school, location and more!

    Austin was so generous with his time and wisdom, you are going to love this!

    Apply to the CPT MFBA Online Program www.creativepeptalk.com/mfba

    Show Notes Austin Kleon http://austinkleon.com/

    Moomin Comics https://www.drawnandquarterly.com/moomin-book-one

    Nancy Strips http://nancyandsluggo.com/

    Bruce Eric Kaplan http://bruceerickaplan.com/

    Public School http://gotopublicschool.com/

    Bill Cunningham New York https://www.amazon.com/Bill-Cunningham-York-Anna-Wintour/dp/B0050I975Q

    John Maeda Talk (Paul Rand Quote) http://www.fastcodesign.com/3036833/innovation-by-design/ex-risd-president-john-maeda-to-designers-make-lots-of-money

    Hugh MacLeoud - Ignore Everybody https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0026NBZFI/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/creativepeptalk/099-austin-kleon-on-creative-community-more
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 06 Aug 2016 15:03:17 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by tkadlec

  6. 5by5 | The Big Web Show #146: Know Your Web Design History – Glenn Davis of Project Cool, Cool Site of the Day, and The Web Standards Project

    Glenn Davis is the creator of Cool Site of the Day; cofounder of Project Cool; and cofounder, Executive Committee member, and essayist for The Web Standards Project, which he also hosted. Glenn was a leading force behind Liquid Design, an approach that predates Responsive Web Design by about 20 years. He taught everyone how to do “DHTML” via his Project Cool tutorials. In the Silicon Valley from 1994 through the early 2000s, Glenn was a huge creative force.

    In a lively hour, Glenn and host Jeffrey Zeldman discuss life before the animated GIF; “perceived bandwidth;” building their first websites; getting from Gopher to the web; SLIP and PPP connections; discovering UNIX; the story behind Cool Site of the Day; the battle for standards in our browsers; the web then versus the web now; and much, much more.

    http://5by5.tv/bigwebshow/146

    —Huffduffed by tkadlec

  7. 101: Sparkbox - CodePen Blog

    This show kicks off what hopefully will be a 10-part mini series where we talk with other businesses that, like us, make money off the web. Some of them will be freemium SaaS (Software as a Service) like us, and some will be more tangentially related. Some will be bigger than us (probably most of them), and some will be smaller.

    In this episode we’re talking to Ben Callahan and Rob Harr from Sparkbox about their experience running an agency - hiring employees, forecasting cash flow, diversifying income, how Sparkbox handles apprenticeships, and how they’re handling growth.

    https://blog.codepen.io/2016/08/09/101-sparkbox/

    —Huffduffed by tkadlec

  8. The Web Platform Podcast : 101: Browser Wars & Standards Battles

    Brian Kardell (@briankardell) chats with us on Web Development and how it has evolved over the years.  We discuss the beginnings of HTML, Web standards bodies, the inception of The Extensible Web Manifesto, Chapters.io, and more.

    http://thewebplatformpodcast.com/101-browser-wars-standards-battles

    —Huffduffed by tkadlec

  9. The Economist asks: How has DNA shaped the human race?

    Jason Palmer, editor of the Espresso daily-briefing app, is joined by geneticist and broadcaster Adam Rutherford to get to the bottom of the stories told by human DNA. They discuss the genetics of sprinters, the misguided nature v nurture debate and how promiscuous humans’ forebears were.

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/theeconomist/the-economist-asks-how-has-dna-shaped-the-human-race
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 20 Aug 2016 09:36:21 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by tkadlec

  10. Seth Lloyd: Quantum Computer Reality - The Long Now

    The 15th-century Renaissance was triggered, Lloyd began, by a flood of new information which changed how people thought about everything, and the same thing is happening now.

    All of us have had to shift, just in the last couple decades, from hungry hunters and gatherers of information to overwhelmed information filter-feeders.

    Information is physical.

    A bit can be represented by an electron here to signify 0, and there to signify 1.

    Information processing is moving electrons from here to there.

    But for a “qubit" in a quantum computer, an electron is both here and there at the same time, thanks to "wave-particle duality.”

    Thus with “quantum parallelism” you can do massively more computation than in classical computers.

    It’s like the difference between the simple notes of plainsong and all that a symphony can do—a huge multitude of instruments interacting simultaneously, playing arrays of sharps and flats and complex chords.

    Quantum computers can solve important problems like enormous equations and factoring—cracking formerly uncrackable public-key cryptography, the basis of all online commerce.

    With their ability to do “oodles of things at once," quantum computers can also simulate the behavior of larger quantum systems, opening new frontiers of science, as Richard Feynman pointed out in the 1980s.

    Simple quantum computers have been built since 1995, by Lloyd and ever more others.

    Mechanisms tried so far include: electrons within electric fields; nuclear spin (clockwise and counter); atoms in ground state and excited state simultaneously; photons polarized both horizontally and vertically; and super-conducting loops going clockwise and counter-clockwise at the same time; and many more.

    To get the qubits to perform operations—to compute—you can use an optical lattice or atoms in whole molecules or integrated circuits, and more to come.

    The more qubits, the more interesting the computation.

    Starting with 2 qubits back in 1996, some systems are now up to several dozen qubits.

    Over the next 5-10 years we should go from 50 qubits to 5,000 qubits, first in special-purpose systems but eventually in general-purpose computers.

    Lloyd added, “And there’s also the fascinating field of using funky quantum effects such as coherence and entanglement to make much more accurate sensors, imagers, and detectors.”

    Like, a hundred thousand to a million times more accurate.

    GPS could locate things to the nearest micron instead of the nearest meter.

    Even with small quantum computers we will be able to expand the capability of machine learning by sifting vast collections of data to detect patterns and move on from supervised-learning (“That squiggle is a 7”) toward unsupervised-learning—systems that learn to learn.

    The universe is a quantum computer, Lloyd concluded.

    Biological life is all about extracting meaningful information from a sea of bits.

    For instance, photosynthesis uses quantum mechanics in a very sophisticated way to increase its efficiency.

    Human life is expanding on what life has always been—an exercise in machine learning.

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02016/aug/09/quantum-computer-reality/

    —Huffduffed by tkadlec

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