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Tagged with “01” (15)

  1. The City of Things

    Look around you. The buildings in the city you’re looking at are probably much as they looked 25 years ago (I’m taking a punt that you’re not in Shanghai.) They will probably look much like that in 25 years time too. Architecture changes cities slowly, if at all. The major changes in the way we live, work and play in cities are instead played out in a layer of objects bigger than a mobile phone and smaller than a building — vehicles and wearables, street furniture and sensors, informal infrastructure and pop-up structures, ‘sharing economy’ services and soon enough, urban robotics. This layer is parasitical, accessible, adaptable — new applications running on the old hardware — and replete with possibilities and pitfalls. A new practice of city making is emerging as a result, shaped as much by interaction design and service design as by architecture and urban planning. This talk explores some of what this might mean for design, technology and cities, and how these new intersections change what the very-near-future city is.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/dan-hill

    Dan Hill is Executive Director of Futures at the UK’s Future Cities Catapult. A designer and urbanist, he has previously held leadership positions at Fabrica, SITRA, Arup and the BBC. He writes regularly for the likes of Dezeen, Domus and Volume, as well as the renowned blog City of Sound.

    Throughout a career focused on integrating design, technology, cities, media and people, Dan has been responsible for shaping many innovative, popular and critically acclaimed products, services, places, strategies and teams. He is one of the organisers of the acclaimed architecture and urbanism event Postopolis!, running in New York and Los Angeles so far. He also writes City of Sound, generally thought of as one of the leading architecture and urbanism websites, as well as regularly writing for architecture and design press worldwide.

    Dan is also a member of the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, which selects nominees and winners for the Webby Awards, the leading honour for websites, as well as being a jury member for both Core77 and IxDA interaction awards in 2012. He was included in the inaugural list of Sydney’s ‘Creative Catalysts’for the Vivid Sydney arts festival 2009.

    Books and essays include “Dark Matter & Trojan Horses: A Strategic Design Vocabulary” (Strelka Press, 2012), “Sentient City: Ubiquitous Computing, Architecture, and the Future of Urban Space”, Mark Shepard (ed.) (2011), “Best of Technology Writing 2009”, Steven Berlin Johnson (ed.) (Yale University Press, 2010), and “Actions”, Mirko Zardini (ed., 2008), amongst others. His writing also appears regularly in Domus’ magazine, amongst others, where he curates the SuperNormal series. He is also a strategic design advisor to Domus.

    His design work has featured in the Istanbul Design Biennal (2012), the AAA exhibition ‘Remodelling Architecture: Architectural Places - Digital Spaces’ (Sydney, 2009) and ‘Habitar: Bending the urban frame’ (Gijon, 2010).

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  2. Information Doesn’t Want to be Free

    There are three iron laws of information age creativity, freedom and business, woven deep into the fabric of the Internet’s design, the functioning of markets, and the global system of regulation and trade agreements.

    You can’t attain any kind of sustained commercial, creative success without understanding these laws — but more importantly, the future of freedom itself depends on getting them right.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/corydoctorow/

    Cory Doctorow is a science fiction author, activist, journalist, blogger and co-editor of Boing Boing.

    He has written a ton of great books. If you haven’t read them, I recommend starting with Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom and working your way through to his collaboration with Charles Stross, Rapture of the Nerds. Don’t miss out on his fantastic Young Adult novels For The Win, Pirate Cinema, Little Brother and its sequel Homeland. They’re all great.

    Former European director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and co-founder of the Open Rights Group, Cory is a tireless fighter for freedom, campaigning against censorship, DRM, government surveillance and other plagues of our time.

    Cory delivered the closing keynote at the very first dConstruct and it’s truly fitting that he’s back ten years later when the theme of this year’s dConstruct is “Living With The Network.”

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  3. Hypertext as an Agent of Change

    Thomas Pynchon. The Anthropocene. Ferguson. Geoheliocentrism. Teju Cole. Thomas Kuhn’s theory of paradigms. Antigone. A wall. The sixth extinction.

    The ways we transmit information—and the ways in which that information accumulates into narratives—is changing. And if we aren’t careful, it may not change in all the ways we want it to.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/mandybrown/

    Mandy Brown is a wordsmith. She takes other people’s words and hammers them into shape.

    Mandy edited Frank Chimero’s The Shape Of Design. She has edited articles for A List Apart and books for A Book Apart (including the particularly handsome first book).

    More recently, Mandy assembled a dream team to work on her startup Editorially, an online platform for collaborative writing and editing. That didn’t work out in the end, which is a shame because it was a lovely piece of work.

    Before that, Mandy worked as product lead at Typekit, whipping their communications into shape.

    She is one of the Studiomates crew in Brooklyn, where she lives with her husband, Keith and her dog, Jax. They’re both adorable.

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  4. Admiral Shovel and the Toilet Roll

    It begins to look as if we might have been wrong. All those predictions driving us forward throughout history have brought us finally to the unexpected realisation that the future is, suddenly, no longer what it used to be. Oops.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/burke/

    James Burke is a living legend. Or, as he put it, “No-one under the age of fifty has heard of me and everyone over the age of fifty thinks I’m dead.”

    He is a science historian, an author, and a television presenter. But calling James Burke a television presenter is like calling Mozart a busker. His 1978 series Connections and his 1985 series The Day The Universe Changed remain unparalleled pieces of television brilliance covering the history of science and technology.

    Before making those astounding shows, he worked on Tomorrow’s World and went on to become the BBC’s chief reporter on the Apollo Moon missions.

    His books include The Pinball Effect, The Knowledge Web, Twin Tracks and Circles.

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  5. Jeremy Ashkenas: Coffeescript Design Decisions (Full Frontal Conference 2011)

    http://2011.full-frontal.org/schedule

    Although limited by what’s possible to express in simple JavaScript, CoffeeScript tries to provide pieces of clear syntax that fit together in harmony. We’ll dive into the rationale behind some of CoffeeScript’s language choices to look at the trade offs involved, and both the why’s and why not’s.

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  6. Phil Hawksworth: Excessive Enhancement - Are We Taking Proper Care of the Web? (Full Frontal Conference 2011)

    http://2011.full-frontal.org/schedule

    We all love to see exciting and innovative "interface shizzle" driven by JavaScript and the ever increasing rendering capabilities of modern browsers, but are we getting these at the expense of the Web? This talk will explore the good, the bad, and the fugly of rich interfaces, while examining how and why we should take care not to damage the Web.

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  7. Glenn Jones: Beyond the Page (Full Frontal Conference 2011)

    http://2011.full-frontal.org/schedule

    The latest browser APIs now make it possible to redesign how your web pages interact with other applications. Web pages are too often little islands that fail to play well with the wider user interfaces of our devices. This talk will explore the possibilities from Drag and Drop to Web Intents, demonstrating how to make web pages more equal in the world of applications.

    —Huffduffed by thepru

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