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thepru / Rodney Pruitt

Designer, Cartoonist. Loves craft beer, reading, music and films lacking mindless special effects.

There are no people in thepru’s collective.

Huffduffed (67)

  1. Resilient Web Design

    Resilient Web Design By J. Keith

    download

    Tagged with design

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  2. The City of Things

    Look around you. The buildings in the city you’re looking at are probably much as they looked 25 years ago (I’m taking a punt that you’re not in Shanghai.) They will probably look much like that in 25 years time too. Architecture changes cities slowly, if at all. The major changes in the way we live, work and play in cities are instead played out in a layer of objects bigger than a mobile phone and smaller than a building — vehicles and wearables, street furniture and sensors, informal infrastructure and pop-up structures, ‘sharing economy’ services and soon enough, urban robotics. This layer is parasitical, accessible, adaptable — new applications running on the old hardware — and replete with possibilities and pitfalls. A new practice of city making is emerging as a result, shaped as much by interaction design and service design as by architecture and urban planning. This talk explores some of what this might mean for design, technology and cities, and how these new intersections change what the very-near-future city is.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/dan-hill

    Dan Hill is Executive Director of Futures at the UK’s Future Cities Catapult. A designer and urbanist, he has previously held leadership positions at Fabrica, SITRA, Arup and the BBC. He writes regularly for the likes of Dezeen, Domus and Volume, as well as the renowned blog City of Sound.

    Throughout a career focused on integrating design, technology, cities, media and people, Dan has been responsible for shaping many innovative, popular and critically acclaimed products, services, places, strategies and teams. He is one of the organisers of the acclaimed architecture and urbanism event Postopolis!, running in New York and Los Angeles so far. He also writes City of Sound, generally thought of as one of the leading architecture and urbanism websites, as well as regularly writing for architecture and design press worldwide.

    Dan is also a member of the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, which selects nominees and winners for the Webby Awards, the leading honour for websites, as well as being a jury member for both Core77 and IxDA interaction awards in 2012. He was included in the inaugural list of Sydney’s ‘Creative Catalysts’for the Vivid Sydney arts festival 2009.

    Books and essays include “Dark Matter & Trojan Horses: A Strategic Design Vocabulary” (Strelka Press, 2012), “Sentient City: Ubiquitous Computing, Architecture, and the Future of Urban Space”, Mark Shepard (ed.) (2011), “Best of Technology Writing 2009”, Steven Berlin Johnson (ed.) (Yale University Press, 2010), and “Actions”, Mirko Zardini (ed., 2008), amongst others. His writing also appears regularly in Domus’ magazine, amongst others, where he curates the SuperNormal series. He is also a strategic design advisor to Domus.

    His design work has featured in the Istanbul Design Biennal (2012), the AAA exhibition ‘Remodelling Architecture: Architectural Places - Digital Spaces’ (Sydney, 2009) and ‘Habitar: Bending the urban frame’ (Gijon, 2010).

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  3. 1 file

    In this weeks show we talk with Patrick Lauke about WCAG 2 and we discuss the perils of blindly following conventions.full podcast, including transcript for…

    https://archive.org/details/PatrickH.LaukeInterviewOnBoagworldEpisode120Wcag2

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  4. An Interview with Karl Groves — Simply Accessible

    http://simplyaccessible.com/article/karl-groves/ As part of Knowbility’s 2013 John Slatin AccessU, we are proud to present an interview with Karl Groves—one of my co-workers, and speaker at the upcoming AccessU. Karl works on our team as an Accessibility Consultant and is interviewed here by another co-worker, Derek Featherstone. They talk Vikings, testing, workshops and BBQ.

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  5. Salt and its Diverse History

    Steph McGovern sets out to explain the role of Salt in our history. She hears how it has taken root in our language, visits a chemistry class to find out about how it is produced and its importance to our physical well being. She talks to history professor Peter Wallenstein about the unexpected importance of salt in military strategy right up until the 20th Century.

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  6. Podcast on accessibility via the Iconfactory

    Inside: What life is like for a VoiceOver user.

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  7. 93: Curbi | Out of School

    With Fraser on vacation, Bradley is joined by Justin Magraith from Shedworx to discuss Curbi: an amazing parental controls service for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch. We need to make a correction on the end of the show, we will be taking next week off. A new show will be released on 7/21. Sponsors Aerohive…

    http://outofschool.net/2014/07/06/93-curbi/

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  8. Information Doesn’t Want to be Free

    There are three iron laws of information age creativity, freedom and business, woven deep into the fabric of the Internet’s design, the functioning of markets, and the global system of regulation and trade agreements.

    You can’t attain any kind of sustained commercial, creative success without understanding these laws — but more importantly, the future of freedom itself depends on getting them right.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/corydoctorow/

    Cory Doctorow is a science fiction author, activist, journalist, blogger and co-editor of Boing Boing.

    He has written a ton of great books. If you haven’t read them, I recommend starting with Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom and working your way through to his collaboration with Charles Stross, Rapture of the Nerds. Don’t miss out on his fantastic Young Adult novels For The Win, Pirate Cinema, Little Brother and its sequel Homeland. They’re all great.

    Former European director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and co-founder of the Open Rights Group, Cory is a tireless fighter for freedom, campaigning against censorship, DRM, government surveillance and other plagues of our time.

    Cory delivered the closing keynote at the very first dConstruct and it’s truly fitting that he’s back ten years later when the theme of this year’s dConstruct is “Living With The Network.”

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  9. Hypertext as an Agent of Change

    Thomas Pynchon. The Anthropocene. Ferguson. Geoheliocentrism. Teju Cole. Thomas Kuhn’s theory of paradigms. Antigone. A wall. The sixth extinction.

    The ways we transmit information—and the ways in which that information accumulates into narratives—is changing. And if we aren’t careful, it may not change in all the ways we want it to.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/mandybrown/

    Mandy Brown is a wordsmith. She takes other people’s words and hammers them into shape.

    Mandy edited Frank Chimero’s The Shape Of Design. She has edited articles for A List Apart and books for A Book Apart (including the particularly handsome first book).

    More recently, Mandy assembled a dream team to work on her startup Editorially, an online platform for collaborative writing and editing. That didn’t work out in the end, which is a shame because it was a lovely piece of work.

    Before that, Mandy worked as product lead at Typekit, whipping their communications into shape.

    She is one of the Studiomates crew in Brooklyn, where she lives with her husband, Keith and her dog, Jax. They’re both adorable.

    —Huffduffed by thepru

  10. Admiral Shovel and the Toilet Roll

    It begins to look as if we might have been wrong. All those predictions driving us forward throughout history have brought us finally to the unexpected realisation that the future is, suddenly, no longer what it used to be. Oops.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/burke/

    James Burke is a living legend. Or, as he put it, “No-one under the age of fifty has heard of me and everyone over the age of fifty thinks I’m dead.”

    He is a science historian, an author, and a television presenter. But calling James Burke a television presenter is like calling Mozart a busker. His 1978 series Connections and his 1985 series The Day The Universe Changed remain unparalleled pieces of television brilliance covering the history of science and technology.

    Before making those astounding shows, he worked on Tomorrow’s World and went on to become the BBC’s chief reporter on the Apollo Moon missions.

    His books include The Pinball Effect, The Knowledge Web, Twin Tracks and Circles.

    —Huffduffed by thepru

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