thelibrarian / tags / development

Tagged with “development” (4)

  1. Panic Podcast: Pantscast

    Most of us remember the iPhone app store launch in 2008 and the iPhone app gold rush that followed. Indie developers flocked to the platform, all determined to build a breakout app that would earn them millions. And pretty soon that gold rush… turned into a brown rush. Enter Panic, with a ridiculous novelty app and an elaborate fake backstory for a German company that didn’t exist.

    —Huffduffed by thelibrarian

  2. RR 305 Rails 5.1.0

    Rails 5.1.0

    On today’s episode, Charles and David discuss about Rails 5.1.0. The new release is moving the community towards front-end JavaScript. Starting a Vanilla application has even become more convenient with Yarn and Webpack support. Tune in to this exciting talk to learn more!

    “It’s a great move forward without compromising what Rails stands for and its overall integrity—to give you the option to choose where you want to go while still maintaining the convention of configuration.” -David Kimura
    

    Yarn Support in Rails

    The new release comes with Yarn support. Yarn works as a package manager, that allows easy installation of other packages or JavaScript libraries into the Rails app.

    It can also be used to maintain and update the different versions. Overall, having Yarn in Rails 5 provides more convenience than looking for the source outside and pulling it in. Yarn vs NPM

    According to a blog post by Rails, the new release is set “to manage JavaScript dependencies from NPM via Yarn.” As David explains it, Yarn serves like a bundler while NPM serves at the backend. But, he is not so sure about the difference.

    On Charles’ end, what he knows is that NPM includes a dependency management. Although both Charles and David don’t agree with everything they’ve put up, the Rails core team has never failed to provide solid and good reasons for their releases. Convenience with Webpack

    The Webpack support also makes things convenient. Charles loved it when Rails adopted copy script, but felt he had better options.

    As he moved away, he found it difficult to integrate his options. With Webpack, he can now pull up a plugin and simply ensure Webpack does its job.

    —Huffduffed by thelibrarian