thelibrarian / tags / database

Tagged with “database” (2)

  1. #201: SQLite with Richard Hipp - The Changelog

    This week we talked with Richard Hipp, the creator of SQLite, about its history, where it came from, why it succeeded as a database, how it’s development is sustainably funded, and how it’s the most widely deployed database engine in the world.

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    Show notes and links

    Home Page for D. Richard Hipp

    SQLite Home Page

    GDBM

    fopen(3) – Linux manual page

    Bruce Perens – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    https://changelog.com/201/

    —Huffduffed by thelibrarian

  2. Episode 199: Michael Stonebraker on Current Developments in Databases : Software Engineering Radio

    Episode 199: Michael Stonebraker on Current Developments in Databases

    Filed in Episodes

    by SE-Radio

    on December 5, 2013

    • 12 Comments

    Recording Venue: Skype

    Guest: Michael Stonebraker

    Dr. Michael Stonebraker, one of the leading researchers and technology entrepreneurs in the database space, joins Robert for a discussion of database architecture and the emerging NewSQL family of databases. Dr. Stonebraker opens with his take on how the database market is segmented around a small number of use cases: OLTP, data warehouses, and event stream processing. He discusses the origins of the standard architecture for OLTP, which is row-based, and says it’s no longer optimal for any of the use cases that it is applied to. He proceeds to describe some research he has done, showing that row-based databases spend about 90 percent of their time acquiring and releasing locks, buffer management, and other activities that could be characterized as overhead in comparison to main task of reading and writing data. These results, which in Stonebraker’s view are intrinsic to the row-based architecture, require a new architecture to overcome. The discussion proceeds to a new database architecture, known as “NewSQL” or “NewOLTP,” which is single-threaded, lock-free, doesn’t require disk I/O in the critical path, and can scale out to a large multiple node cluster. Stonebraker criticizes the eventual consistency model that some NoSQL distributed systems employ and he defends the ACID guarantees as a superior model. The interview closes with a discussion about database education in university curricula and Stonebraker’s thoughts on the place of Hadoop in the data storage space.

    Michael Stonebraker page at MIT

    VoltDB site

    VoltDB on Meetup

    NewSQL topic page on Wikipedia

    Other NewSQL projects: NuoDB

    SE-Radio #165 on NoSQL

    http://traffic.libsyn.com/seradio/SE-RadioEpisode199-MichaelStonebraker.mp3

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    http://www.se-radio.net/2013/12/episode-199-michael-stonebraker/

    —Huffduffed by thelibrarian