svenkaemper / collective

There are three people in svenkaemper’s collective.

Huffduffed (2595)

  1. Future Ethics with Cennydd Bowles at SustainableUX

    Transcription: https://ethical.net/ethical/future-ethics-with-cennydd-bowles-at-sustainableux/

    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-d3d8DgqVA
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon Dec 9 10:51:10 2019 Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by AlanDalton

  2. Michelle Obama Keynote Address at DNC

    Michelle Obama, wife of Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama, gave the keynote address at the first day of the 2008 Democratic National Convention. After her comments, Sen. Obama (D-IL) greeted the audience via remote camera.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=790hG6qBPx0
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue Dec 3 18:22:29 2019 Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by AlanDalton

  3. C-SPAN: Barack Obama Speech at 2004 DNC Convention

    Then-Illinois State Senator Barack Obama delivered the keynote address at the Democratic National Convention, in Boston, Massachusetts.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWynt87PaJ0
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu Nov 28 10:24:41 2019 Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by AlanDalton

  4. ADL International Leadership Award Presented to Sacha Baron Cohen at Never Is Now 2019

    Sacha Baron Cohen is the well-deserved recipient of ADL’s International Leadership Award, which goes to exceptional individuals who combine professional success with a profound personal commitment to community involvement and to crossing borders and barriers with a message of diversity and equal opportunity.

    Over 100 years ago Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis wrote: “Sunlight is said to be the best disinfectant.” Through his alter egos, many of whom represent anti-Semites, racists and neo-Nazis, Baron Cohen shines a piercing light on people’s ignorance and biases.

    https://www.adl.org/news/article/sacha-baron-cohens-keynote-address-at-adls-2019-never-is-now-summit-on-anti-semitism

    copyright © 2019 ADL

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    Original video: https://youtube.com/watch?v=ymaWq5yZIYM
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri Nov 22 06:02:26 2019 Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by AlanDalton

  5. Eat Like The Ancient Babylonians: Researchers Cook Up Nearly 4,000-Year-Old Recipes

    What did a meal taste like nearly 4,000 years ago in ancient Babylonia? Pretty good, according to a team of international scholars who have deciphered and are re-creating what are considered to be the world’s oldest-known culinary recipes.

    The recipes were inscribed on ancient Babylonian tablets that researchers have known about since early in the 20th century but that were not properly translated until the end of the century.

    The tablets are part of the Yale Babylonian Collection at the Yale Peabody Museum. Three of the tablets date back to the Old Babylonian period, no later than 1730 B.C., according to Harvard University Assyriologist and cuneiform scholar Gojko Barjamovic, who put together the interdisciplinary team that is reviving these ancient recipes in the kitchen. A fourth tablet was produced about 1,000 years later. All four tablets are from the Mesopotamian region, in what is today Turkey, Syria, Iran and Iraq.

    For a long time, says Barjamovic, scholars thought the tablets might be medical texts. In the 1940s, a researcher named Mary Hussey suggested the writing was actually recipes, but "people really didn’t believe her" at the time, he says.

    "The tablets all list recipes that include instructions on how to prepare them," the authors write in a piece about their work published in Lapham’s Quarterly earlier this year. "One is a summary collection of twenty-five recipes of stews or broths with brief directions. The other two tablets contain fewer recipes, each described in much more detail. "

    The researchers write that the "stews represent an early stage of a long tradition that is still dominant in Iraqi cuisine" — specifically, aromatic lamb stews "often slightly thickened, enhanced with rendered sheep’s tail fat, and flavored with a combination of spices and herbs and members of the Allium family, such as onion, garlic, and leek. These seem to be direct descendants of the Babylonian versions found on the culinary tablet with stew recipes."

    So far, the cooking team — which also includes a food historian, a curator, a chemical biologist specializing in food, a professional chef and an expert on cultural heritage — has re-created three stews. "One is a beet stew, one is vegetarian, and the final one has lamb in it," says Barjamovic.

    NPR’s Scott Simon spoke with Barjamovic about the research. A transcript of their conversation, edited for clarity, follows.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  6. Talking Politics: Esther Duflo

    David and Helen talk to Nobel Prize-winning economist (the youngest ever!) Esther Duflo about how to do economics better. From investing in left-behind places to helping people adapt to change, we discuss good and bad economic ideas about some of the biggest challenges we face, and how it all connects back to politics. Plus we talk about what some of the world’s richest countries can learn from some of the poorest. Esther’s new book, with Abhijit Bannerjee, is Good Economics for Hard Times https://bit.ly/33q6uOm

    Talking Points: 

    Why do economists believe “Invest in People not Places?” And why are they wrong?  - The idea is that it’s better to target interventions at individual people than places, in part because people will move. - But research shows that people are remarkably sticky. They don’t really move. - Even faced with really high costs, and the complete freedom to move to another place, people don’t. During the Greek financial crisis, very few people left. - Mobility is easier at younger ages.

    Why do people stick? - In the U.S., one of the biggest factors is real estate. Wages may be higher on the coast, but housing is much more expensive. - People are not driven only, or even primarily by financial incentives

    The U.S. has not treated people who were left behind by manufacturing very well. - There is an implosion of economic activity in one place because people don’t move.

    The class and place categories are marred. The people who can afford to live in the big cities tend to be relatively well off. - This was at the root of the Yellow Vests movement in France.  - Although there is also a lot of poverty in big cities. - Class is no longer defining political lines in the same way.

    How, as a society, can we prepare better for transitions?  - It starts at birth: an excellent preschool education, followed by an excellent primary and secondary school education, and finally equal access to University.  - When shocks happen, being willing to spend. - Some people will never move and we should make their lives honorable where they are.

    Mentioned in this Episode: - Esther’s book, Good Economics for Hard Times - “The Gift of Moving” (more on the Iceland case)

    Further Learning: - Esther and Abhijit Banerjee in The Guardian - And on economic incentives in The New York Times

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  7. Jeanne Spellman: Re-imagining Accessibility Guidelines - #a11yTO Meetup June 2018

    0:01:26 Nell Chitty housekeeping announcements 0:05:46 Jeanne Spellman talk 1:07:35 pizza break 1:21:10 feedback time 1:41:40 wrap-up

    #a11yTO is bringing in a very special guest for June’s Meetup: Jeanne Spellman!

    Jeanne is a Facilitator of the Silver Task Force, which will succeed WCAG 2. Silver proposes to bring many improvements, for example: plain language, grades for conformance, support new technology (IOT, home assistants, etc.), evolutionary content, revolutionary structure, and making resources easier to find.

    The next major revision to W3C Accessibility Guidelines to succeed WCAG 2 is in process. Last year, #a11yTO Camp gave valuable input into the research. See the results of the research and the prototypes for the new guidelines. Give your input on what you want to see in the new accessibility guidelines.

    Jeanne Spellman joined the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) from 2008 to 2015 as the team contact for the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines Working Group, User Agent Accessibility Guidelines Working Group and the Mobile Accessibility Task Force. Jeanne joined the Paciello Group in 2016 and became a member of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Working Group. She is currently co-facilitator of the Silver Task Force and co-chair of the …

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-AXSXHQyGU
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 29 Oct 2019 02:09:27 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by AlanDalton

  8. “Digital Marketing Strategies for the Busy ‘Web Master’” by Sarah Parmenter—An Event Apart video

    Nowadays, the job of the multi-faceted web designer is to not only know the latest techniques for building in Grid, but also know how to get that work seen amongst the saturated world of digital marketing. In this hour-long talk from An Event Apart Orlando 2018, Sarah Parmenter discusses the idea of quarterly website design reviews with a “design once, use everywhere” mantra, and digs into the ever changing world of Instagram algorithms, Facebook marketing, and topical social media takeaways for immediate implementation. Sarah Parmenter owns You Know Who, a small British design studio now in its second decade. She specialises in iOS User Interface design; regularly contributes to various online and printed media; and speaks at related conferences all over the world. Sarah’s straight-talking nature and no-fuss approach to projects have landed her many great contracts over the years, with various well known brands in the UK and abroad.

    Enjoy all the videos in An Event Apart’s library! There are over 60 hours of them—all absolutely free—at aneventapart.com/news/videos. For more insightful presentations by the industry’s best and brightest, come to An Event Apart—three days of design, code, and content for web, UX, and interaction designers (aneventapart.com/events).

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    Original video: https://vimeo.com/325322044
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 16 Oct 2019 17:29:30 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by AlanDalton

  9. Episode 2 | Cennydd Bowles — After the flood

    Max Gadney sat down with author and designer Cennyd Bowles to discuss what technologists and the design industry can do to challenge the values and ethical principles of the work they do.

    https://aftertheflood.com/journal/podcast/after-the-flood-podcast-episode-2/

    —Huffduffed by AlanDalton

  10. The Atomic Minimalist: My Conversation with James Clear (Cal Newport)

    https://www.calnewport.com/blog/2019/10/16/the-atomic-minimalist-my-conversation-with-james-clear/

    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/jamesclear/james-clear-and-cal-newport
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 16 Oct 2019 07:38:51 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by AlanDalton

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