subnet / Michael

There are no people in subnet’s collective.

Huffduffed (8)

  1. SitePoint Podcast #44: HTML5 is a (Beautiful) Mess

    Episode 44 of The SitePoint Podcast is now available! This week, Kevin Yank (@sentience) is joined by Opera Software’s Bruce Lawson (@brucel), SitePoint author Ian Lloyd (@lloydi), and Kyle Weems (@cssquirrel), creator of the CSSquirrel web comic, to discuss the latest uproar from within the W3C HTML5 Working Group. Is progress towards the HTML5 standard at risk of derailing, or is this just par for the course in the wild, wild world of standards development?

    http://www.sitepoint.com/blogs/2010/01/15/podcast-44-html5-is-a-beautiful-mess/

    —Huffduffed by subnet

  2. RWW Live: The Local & Mobile Web

    One of the big trends on the web is more and more location aware / sensitive web applications. Increasingly powerful mobile devices are enabling this. In this episode of RWW Live, we talk about how the Web is evolving to include more location aware applications and what barriers are still in the way - both social & technical barriers.

    Joining me from ReadWriteWeb are Marshall Kirkpatrik

    —Huffduffed by subnet

  3. The World on Haiti and Google/China

    Finally, from The World, we have this double-whammy tech podcast, the first half of which is a discussion of affairs in Haiti and the second half of which focuses on the topic of this week’s parade. If you skip to the 10:33 mark, you’ll hear Clark Boyd recapping the news and an in-depth report from veteran East Asia correspondent Mary Kay Magistad, who has covered news in this region for almost six years. She states that surfing the web right now in Beijing is like being in a different world now that Google has unblocked search terms and content, leaving China’s censors scrambling to keep up. The rest of her report is a fascinating mosaic of interviews and insight - a must-listen for those who would be informed and sound intelligent on the Google-China debacle.

    From http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/friday_podcast_parade_google_china_told_by_folks_w.php

    —Huffduffed by subnet

  4. The War for the Web

    Tim O’Reilly Web 2.0 Conference 23 minutes, 11mb, recorded 2009-11-17

    The early days of the internet were truly astonishing. As people came to comprehend the power of networked information, they seized the many opportunities for innovation created by the open architecture of the web. Of course, the browser wars also showed that threats to openness and interoperability were a real danger. Today, Tim O’Reilly worries that escalating competition between large companies and closed platforms may drive the web towards a battle ground of locked down services and proprietary data.

    As large, powerful players have emerged on the internet landscape, you don’t have to look far to see some troubling skirmishes between opposing forces. O’Reilly touches on several examples where well known web applications include features designed to limit flexibility and user choice. To some extent, limits may be necessary to protect privacy, but in some cases, there is clear intent to lock in users at the expense of the competition. The situation is even more extreme in the mobile arena.

    Will the large companies play by the cherished rules of the open web as we’ve known it? It may depend on how "the cloud" grows. As web service companies such as Amazon, Google, Apple and Microsoft make O’Reilly’s notion of the web 2.0 "internet as a platform" a reality, they will have choices on how to maneuver. There is pressure for the giants to forge alliances, and leverage unique services as weapons to gain competitive advantage in the marketplace. But, history has shown that internet success often comes if you "do what you do best, link to the rest". O’Reilly urges companies to stick to their core strengths, maintain an open architecture, and embrace the "small pieces loosely joined" philosophy.

    From: http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4317.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed

    —Huffduffed by subnet