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Tagged with “language” (177)

  1. #102 | Whatever Happened to Bean Pháidín? - Irish Lyrics in Translation - HeadStuff

    Darach is joined by Peadar and Póilín Ní Géidigh to discuss the treasury of traditional Irish lyrics and how their expressiveness is lost in translation.

    https://www.headstuff.org/motherfocloir/102-whatever-happened-to-bean-phaidin-irish-lyrics-in-translation/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. #33 | Langers, Gowls and our Oral Tradition - HeadStuff

    Darach Ó Séaghdha chats to Jody Coogan about some Hiberno-English slang words and whether they have an Irish origin or not, followed by a roundtable on irregular Irish verbs and the Irish oral exam with Ola Majekodunmi, Clodagh McGinley and Gearóidín McEvoy.

    https://www.headstuff.org/motherfocloir/33-langers-gowls-and-our-oral-tradition/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Why it’s time to stop worrying about the decline of the English language – podcast | News | The Guardian

    People often complain that English is deteriorating under the influence of new technology, adolescent fads and loose grammar. Why does this nonsensical belief persist?

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2019/sep/13/why-its-time-to-stop-worrying-about-the-decline-of-the-english-language-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Celeste Headlee: 10 ways to have a better conversation | TED Talk

    When your job hinges on how well you talk to people, you learn a lot about how to have conversations — and that most of us don’t converse very well. Celeste Headlee has worked as a radio host for decades, and she knows the ingredients of a great conversation: Honesty, brevity, clarity and a healthy amount of listening. In this insightful talk, she shares 10 useful rules for having better conversations. "Go out, talk to people, listen to people," she says. "And, most importantly, be prepared to be amazed."

    https://www.ted.com/talks/celeste_headlee_10_ways_to_have_a_better_conversation

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Allusionist 100. The Hundredth — The Allusionist

    To mark the 100th episode of the Allusionist, here’s a celebratory parade of language-related facts: some of your favourites from the Allusionist back catalogue, some of my favourites from the Allusionist back catalogue, and a load of fresh facts making their Allusionist debut.

    https://www.theallusionist.org/allusionist/hundredth

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Mark Pagel: How language transformed humanity | TED Talk

    Biologist Mark Pagel shares an intriguing theory about why humans evolved our complex system of language. He suggests that language is a piece of "social technology" that allowed early human tribes to access a powerful new tool: cooperation.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/mark_pagel_how_language_transformed_humanity

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Four Thought: All The Music We’ll Never Hear

    Ian Brennan is a Grammy award-winning music producer. He and his wife have travelled the world discovering music that most people have never heard.

    He argues that the ‘West’ and in particular English speaking countries have dominated music for so long they have drowned out voices from around the world.

    This includes the incredible story of the Tanzanian Albinism Collective, from one of the most isolated places on earth. The members have suffered persecution for years for their condition. Brennan describes how music has brought them together with their neighbours.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bh5hp8

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. John McWhorter on the Evolution of Language and Words on the Move - Econlib

    How did bad come to mean good? Why is Shakespeare so hard to understand? Is there anything good about "like" and "you know?" Author and professor John McWhorter of Columbia University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the unplanned ways that English speakers create English, an example of emergent order. Topics discussed include how words get short (but not too short), the demand for vividness in language, and why Shakespeare is so hard to understand.

    http://www.econtalk.org/john-mcwhorter-on-the-evolution-of-language-and-words-on-the-move/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Oh For Cute - 8 October 2018

    A stereotype is a preconceived notion about a person or group. Originally, though, the word stereotype referring to a printing device used to produce lots of identical copies. If you suspect there’s a connection, you’re right!  Also, the link between tiny mythical creatures called trolls and modern-day mischief-makers, plus the stories behind the color names we give to horses. Finally, wise advice about fending off despair: learn something new. Also, grinslies, personal summers, cowboy slang, smell vs. odor, orient vs. orientate, trolls and trolling, and just for fun, some agentive and instrumental exocentric verb-noun compounds.

    http://feeds.waywordradio.org/~r/awwwpodcast/~3/eySt5vvnMBc/181008-AWWW-Oh-For-Cute.mp3

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Where did language come from? - Big Ideas - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Human evolution is a million-year story.  Yet language only appeared in the last 100,000 years. Psychologist Michael Corballis believes that language evolution is far older and more complex. He describes the connections between language and thinking and argues that we underestimate the cognitive ability of other animals.

    https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/where-did-language-come-from/10404342

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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