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Huffduffed (303)

  1. The Interview Results Capture Meeting (Hall Of Fame Guidance) | Manager Tools

    This cast explains how to capture interview results in a fast and simple meeting.

    One of the things we have learned over the years is that bad hiring is easy, and good hiring is hard.

    It’s easy to hire someone who isn’t going to work out - just do one interview, don’t dig for details, don’t listen to the doubts you’re feeling, don’t interview for the soft skills.

    Of course, this is what happens far too often…and then when there are culture or discipline problems, everyone starts talking about changing the culture, or doing exit interviews.

    But the answer lies in smarter — and harder — hiring.

    In this cast, we share a simple way for a hiring manager to make a decision about a candidate.

    You’ll probably hear a surprise or two, so listen in … and you’ll also hear Horstman’s Law of Bad Hiring!

    This cast is one in a series to be called How to Hire, which is part of our larger set of series on Managing Talent.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2008/04/the-interview-results-capture-meeting

    —Huffduffed by snydejon

  2. Direct Relationships Acid Test | Manager Tools

    This cast prescribes asking your directs what their children’s names are.

    We’ve asked the question at every Manager Tools Effective Manager Conference, and every internal client session where One on Ones were covered. The answers are eerily similar. And the answers PROVE that the average professional manager really does NOT know what she needs to know to be effective.

    What’s the question? Well, it’s a series of questions, actually. And this cast walks EVERYONE through them. You’ve probably heard them before - we routinely mention them. But sometimes the things that go without saying bear repeating.

    What Is More Important To You, Your Family or Your Work?

    What is More Important To Your Directs, Their Family or Their Work?

    With That In Mind, Can You Name Each Of The Children Of Each Of Your Direct Reports?

    Find Out NOW.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2009/08/direct-relationships-acid-test

    —Huffduffed by snydejon

  3. How to Set Annual Goals (Part 3 of 3) | Manager Tools

    In this cast, we complete our series on setting annual goals with Mark’s story of John and the Gate Guards.

    Although "merely" a story, don’t fool yourself…there are valuable lessons in there!

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2008/01/how-to-set-annual-goals-part-3-of-3

    —Huffduffed by snydejon

  4. How to Set Annual Goals (Part 2 of 3) | Manager Tools

    In this cast, we continue our conversation on setting annual goals.

    Last week we discussed our general thoughts on Goals, and particularly our thinly-veiled disdain for SMART goals.

    Today, we continue our conversation and discuss our core rules for setting goals.

    Next week, we’ll conclude the series with our story of "John and the Gate Guards."

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2008/01/how-to-set-annual-goals-part-2-of-3

    —Huffduffed by snydejon

  5. How to Set Annual Goals (Part 1 of 3) | Manager Tools

    In this cast, we recommend how to start setting annual goals, and why we do not like "SMART" goals.

    Many managers are going through goal setting efforts right now, for 2008.

    We get lots of questions about goals, and goal setting, this time of year.

    Sometimes, they’re dispiriting.

    Managers seem to spend an awful lot of time word-smithing their intent into corporate frameworks.

    All that time would be FAR better spent thinking about the goals themselves, and how the achievement of those goals will help the organization.

    A lot of managers have to create goals that are "SMART", and we don’t recommend your doing so unless you have to.

    We dislike them SO much we almost called this cast, "SMART Goals are Stupid."

    (We REALLY don’t like them).

    In fact, we spend a good bit of time in our introduction talking about SMART goals, so beware.

    The fact that the technique is so widespread and so often ineffective causes us to want to address it fully.

    And hey, who would have thought that our answer would be "MT Goals"?

    Cool.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2007/12/how-to-set-annual-goals-part-1-of-3

    —Huffduffed by snydejon

  6. Managing a High C - Dangers - Part 1 | Manager Tools

    Managing a rule-following, process focused perfectionist can be infuriating if you don’t share their interest in details and data. How can you help a perfectionist "High C" be more effective in a world where deadlines and people matter?

    Having a High C on your team can be a powerful additive to your success. High C’s are detail conscious, not afraid of hard work, willing to dig into the details, and often exceptional negotiators known for their preparedness and mastery of the minutiae. So, let’s all have nothing but C’s on our teams, right?

    Maybe not. There will be preparedness and plans and processes and procedures… and waiting forever for anything resembling a result. The ocean will be boiled, but only then can the "real work begin." And assume you need an annual calendar and not a watch to determine deadlines.

    Just like the rest of the four major behavioral profiles in the DiSC behavioral instrument we favor and teach, High C’s cause their share of headaches. They infuriate a lot of bosses with their methodical-ness and ready, aim, aim, aim, aim, aim, aim, mentality.

    What ARE the dangers of managing a High C, and what can we do about them?

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2015/04/managing-high-c-dangers-part-1

    —Huffduffed by snydejon

  7. Managing a High C - Dangers - Part 2 | Manager Tools

    Managing a rule-following, process focused perfectionist can be infuriating if you don’t share their interest in details and data. How can you help a perfectionist "High C" be more effective in a world where deadlines and people matter?

    Having a High C on your team can be a powerful additive to your success. High C’s are detail conscious, not afraid of hard work, willing to dig into the details, and often exceptional negotiators known for their preparedness and mastery of the minutiae. So, let’s all have nothing but C’s on our teams, right?

    Maybe not. There will be preparedness and plans and processes and procedures… and waiting forever for anything resembling a result. The ocean will be boiled, but only then can the "real work begin." And assume you need an annual calendar and not a watch to determine deadlines.

    Just like the rest of the four major behavioral profiles in the DiSC behavioral instrument we favor and teach, High C’s cause their share of headaches. They infuriate a lot of bosses with their methodical-ness and ready, aim, aim, aim, aim, aim, aim, mentality.

    What ARE the dangers of managing a High C, and what can we do about them?

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2015/04/managing-high-c-dangers-part-2

    —Huffduffed by snydejon

  8. The First Question In Your One on One | Manager Tools

    This cast describes how to start every One on One.

    One of the most important lessons for experienced users of the One on One Manager Tool is the value of continuity over instances. One on Ones are in a sense like feedback in that no single instance of either is important. It’s the commitment and I-can-count-on-my-boss-interacting-with-me-this-way repetition that deliver a major part of the value of these Manager Tools.

    Now, look, you can’t create continuity while ignoring instances. In order to be admired for one’s constancy, one has to repeatedly do things, for a while. But a lot of managers are looking for the silver bullet, the ONE THING, the great idea, that makes management easy. If we had to pick one, it really would be One on Ones…but it’s not the 30 minute INSTANCE of a one on one that matters…it’s the constancy. Constancy is the complement of all other virtues, as the saying goes. Hey, we admit it - One on Ones are the slowest moving silver bullet ever invented.

    So, what are some of the behaviors we can engage in in each INSTANCE of our One on Ones that increase the value of our CONSTANCY? The first is our first question.

    Ask The Same First Question EVERY Time

    Write Down The Answer EVERY Time

    Some Recommended First Questions

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2009/09/first-question-your-one-one

    —Huffduffed by snydejon

  9. Getting Ready To Be Promoted: The 150% Rule | Manager Tools

    Our guidance on how to approach your responsibilities when you want to be promoted.

    Manager Tools sets a tough standard for promotion. You have to be able to do all of your job to the top performance standard AND 50% of your boss’s job. Not all companies will be this tough on you, but if you set your goal there, you’ll be far ahead of the competition.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2014/06/getting-ready-be-promoted-150-rule

    —Huffduffed by snydejon

  10. Annual Review When Looking For Promotion | Manager Tools

    Our guidance on how to use your annual review in your promotion campaign.

    Promotions and pay raises don’t just happen. People don’t get better jobs, titles or perks because they turn up every day. The days when seniority meant something are gone, at least in the majority of organizations. If you want a promotion, you need to think of it as at least an 18 month campaign, starting with your annual review.

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2014/03/annual-review-when-looking-promotion

    —Huffduffed by snydejon

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