Longform Podcast #173: Doug McGray

Possibly related…

  1. Hired. - Wilson Miner: Design alone couldn’t save Rdio, The California Sunday Magazine

    Wilson Miner is the Director of Digital Design for The California Sunday Magazine. His career has spanned Facebook, Apple, and the now-defunct Rdio. We discuss highlights from Wilson’s career, his famous “When We Build” talk, why design alone couldn’t save Rdio’s illustrious streaming music service. (Photo by Monica Semergiu.)

    https://hired.fm/seasons/3/episodes/3

    —Huffduffed by Lendamico

  2. 99% Invisible | 18: Check Cashing Stores

    A few years ago, journalist Douglas McGray learned that the largest chain of check cashing stores in Southern California, Nix Check Cashing, was being bought by the nation’s largest credit union, Kinecta. The credit union thought it had something to learn from the check casher about how to reach out and serve the poor. This was curious. McGray’s impression was that check cashers (and especially payday lenders) were predatory, the bad guys, and that credit unions, especially one dedicated to serving the poor, were the good guys. This proposed sale made McGray look at the whole situation with fresh eyes.

    I highly recommend reading Douglas McGray’s New York Times Magazine article all about it. It’s excellent.

    I, of course, was drawn to the design aspects of the story.

    Check cashing stores can feel very odd when you’re not used to them. Quite simply, they are often designed to look and feel more like a corner store. The furnishings are sparse, and the information is on signs— big, bold and clearly presented. Banks, on the other hand, have a design legacy of carpeting, heavy desks, suits, and pamphlets that are hard to parse. If you were to start over and design a financial products retail location today, which model would you follow?

    Douglas McGray is also the editor-in-chief of Pop-Up Magazine– the world’s first live magazine, created for a stage, a screen, and a live audience. Having been lucky enough to both present and experience Pop-Up as an audience member several times, I can honestly say, it’s the best thing to happen to San Francisco since homosexuals.

    (Check cashing store photo by arimooore. Note: This is not a Nix store.)

    Full Transcript

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/episode-18-check-cashing-stores-download-embed/

    —Huffduffed by 5moufl

  3. 99% Invisible: Check Cashing Stores

    A few years ago, journalist Douglas McGray learned that the largest chain of check cashing stores in Southern California, Nix Check Cashing, was being bought by the nation’s largest credit union, Kinecta. The credit union thought it had something to learn from the check casher about how to reach out and serve the poor. This was curious. McGray’s impression was that check cashers (and especially payday lenders) were predatory, the bad guys, and that credit unions, especially one dedicated to serving the poor, were the good guys. This proposed sale made McGray look at the whole situation with fresh eyes.

    I highly recommend reading Douglas McGray’s New York Times Magazine article all about it. It’s excellent.

    I, of course, was drawn to the design aspects of the story.

    Check cashing stores can feel very odd when you’re not used to them. Quite simply, they are often designed to look and feel more like a corner store. The furnishings are sparse, and the information is on signs— big, bold and clearly presented. Banks, on the other hand, have a design legacy of carpeting, heavy desks, suits, and pamphlets that are hard to parse. If you were to start over and design a financial products retail location today, which model would you follow?

    http://soundcloud.com/roman-mars/99-invisible-18-check-cashing/

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw

  4. 99% Invisible | 10: 99% Sound and Feel

    Chris Downey explains it like this, “Beethoven continued to write music, even some of his best music, after he lost his hearing…What’s more preposterous, composing music you can’t hear, or designing architecture you can’t see?” Chris Downey had been an architect for 20 years before he lost his sight. It would be understandable to think that going blind would mean the end of his career, but that turned out not to be the case at all.

    Several people have reported Downey’s story, but it was the Doug McGray (Pop-Up Magazine Editor and New America Foundation fellow) article in The Atlantic that first got my attention. Days later, AIA-SF Executive Director Margie O’Driscoll sent me this interview suggesting Chris as a possible 99% Invisible subject. Chris Downey has a way of inspiring and amazing everyone- who then want to share his story with others. Including me.

    Photo: Some rights reserved by Samuraijohnny

    Full Transcript

    http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/episode-10-99-sound-and-feel/

    —Huffduffed by 5moufl

  5. Wahine passenger Doug Crombie: ‘I thought, I’ll be right’

    On 10 April it will be 50 years since the inter-island passenger ferry Wahine went down near the Wellington coast killing 53 people. Doug Crombie was on the ship with his cricket team from Lincoln University. He tells his story for the first time. On Tuesday there are a number of events in Wellington to remember that day, organised by the Wahine 50 Trust.

    http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/sunday/audio/2018639571/wahine-passenger-doug-crombie-i-thought-i-ll-be-right

    —Huffduffed by tingbo