Why Can Some People Recall Every Day Of Their Lives? Brain Scans Offer Clues : Shots - Health Blog : NPR

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  1. On Point: E-Memory & Human Nature

    Human memory is a famously tricky thing. We remember some things. We forget a lot more. And we shape and sculpt the memories we do have with a vengeance. But more and more, the actual events of our lives are being recorded electronically. In Facebook albums and Twitter posts and smartphone files, yes, but also in thousands of digital transactions we don’t even think about. Now, two top Microsoft computer scientists are talking about an era of e-memory — "total recall" — as a revolution in what it means to be human. This hour, On Point: E-memory, total recall, and human nature.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. robert bjork - using our memory shapes our memory

    Unlike a typical data-storage device human memory is shaped by its use. Information stored in memory is made more or less accessible by how the information is used. Non-use makes it more difficult to retrieve, while recall of information strengthens the memory and makes it easier to recall later.

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    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 04 Feb 2019 00:28:22 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by andrewdouch

  3. Bionic Brains And What Science Can Foresee

    In case you don’t read The Journal of Neural Engineering, here’s the news: scientists have created a brain implant that restores lost memory function and strengthens recall.

    A brain implant. Now, it was in a rat. But it’s proven what can be done.

    And offered a glimpse of what’s coming for humans. There is lots of talk about the “bionic brain.” To repair injuries, like Gabby Giffords’.

    To supplement brains like yours and mine. Check out this headline: “Intel Wants Brain Implants in Customers Heads by 2020.”

    It’s exciting, and it’s scary.

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2011/06/21/bionic-brains

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. Brain Cells ‘Geotag’ Memories To Cache What Happened — And Where : Shots - Health News : NPR

    Scientists have identified special cells in the brain’s hippocampus that mimic a trick of some digital cameras. These cells automatically ‘tag’ the memory of each event in our lives with information about where that event took place — the better to recall, perhaps, where we left our lost keys.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/11/28/247541093/brain-cells-geotag-memories-to-cache-what-happened-and-where?ft=1&f=2&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NprProgramsATC+%28NPR+Programs%3A+All+Things+Considered%29

    download

    Tagged with place —

    —Huffduffed by jeffhammett

  5. The Midnight Scan Club sheds new light on the human brain | Public Radio International

    Most of our knowledge of the human brain comes from the group average of thousands of MRI scans. Dr. Nico Dosenbach felt he could gain more knowledge by collecting detailed individual scans. But with few resources at his disposal, he and his colleagues had to be creative.

    https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-08-20/midnight-scan-club-sheds-new-light-human-brain

    —Huffduffed by abrin

  6. BrainCast: episode 20

    Episode 20 updates you on the latest health news and features another great Creative Visualization exercise that will transport you to the beaches of Hawaii. There’s also plenty of simple maths exercises to get your brain firing as well as new logic and memory exercises and much much more! Get a complete brain cross-training - just by listening along! (http://www.brainready.com/braincasts/)

    Featured on episode 26 of Forgotten Classics.

    —Huffduffed by JulieD