122: The Most Important Decision You’ll Make as a Writer

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  1. How to Give a Decision Briefing - Part 1 | Manager Tools

    This cast describes how to give a decision briefing to your manager.

    We need a decision from our boss, and we can’t get one. What do most of us do? Complain to our peers. This is not a recipe for success, nor changed behavior on your boss’s part.

    Usually, bosses don’t make decisions because there’s less pain associated with not making it than there is in making it. Once a boss makes a decision, she has the risk of being wrong. But until she makes the decision, very possibly the negative is that we get less time to take action because we’re waiting on the decision. In other words, "no" pain for the boss.

    How do we get our bosses to make a decision? How can we present a chance to make a decision in a way that maximizes our chances of getting one?

    Use The Career Tools Decision Brief Model: SOCRR

    Situation

    Options

    Comparison

    Recommendation

    Request

    Always Consider Two Hidden Factors: Time and Risk

    Use SOCRR Always - Longer or Shorter, Versus Important Enough or Not

    Effective Decision Briefs Are Virtually ALWAYS Pre-Wired

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2010/03/how-give-a-decision-briefing-part-1

    —Huffduffed by jaywest

  2. How to Give a Decision Briefing - Part 2 | Manager Tools

    In this cast, we conclude our conversation on giving a decision briefing to your manager.

    Use The Career Tools Decision Brief Model: SOCRR

    Situation

    Options

    Comparison

    Recommendation

    Request

    Always Consider Two Hidden Factors: Time and Risk

    Use SOCRR Always - Longer or Shorter, Versus Important Enough or Not

    Effective Decision Briefs Are Virtually ALWAYS Pre-Wired

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2010/03/how-give-a-decision-briefing-part-2

    —Huffduffed by jaywest

  3. Ep037: How to make better, faster decisions with Jeff Annello

    Lots of people struggle with making good decisions. It’s an important skill to build, especially if you lead others (or aspire to), but there are many obstacles to good decision making. Writer, researcher, and thinker Jeff Annello of the popular Farnam Street website and newsletter talks to Halelly Azulay, host of the TalentGrow Show, about how to become better at making effective and efficient decisions. They discuss the role of mental models, intuition, and thinking errors and biases in decision making and how to become more aware of and fight against them. What specifically is important for leaders to know to make better decisions and help their teams to improve their decision quality. Finally, Jeff gives a very actionable tip that you can implement immediately to begin ratcheting up your own decision making skills. Don’t forget to subscribe and leave a rating and review on iTunes and share this episode with others who could also benefit!

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    Original video: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=at2MOdibz80
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 14 Apr 2017 10:31:50 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    Tagged with people & blogs

    —Huffduffed by jasonbraganza

  4. How Much of My Decision-Making Is Emotional? (Episode 607) by AskPastorJohn | Free Listening on SoundCloud

    How Much of My Decision-Making Is Emotional? (Episode 607)

    by AskPastorJohn

    published on 2015/05/14 15:11:25 +0000

    Search hundreds of past episodes, get the free apps, or ask John Piper a question, all at http://dsr.gd/AskPastorJohn . All content © 2015 Desiring God Foundation. How Much of My Decision-Making Is Emotional? (Episode 607) • Fri, 5/29

    Download How Much of My Decision-Making Is Emotional? (Episode 607)

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    License: all-rights-reserved

    https://soundcloud.com/askpastorjohn/how-much-of-my-decision-making-is-emotional-episode-607

    —Huffduffed by kevinbehringer

  5. RSA - Willpower: Self-control, decision fatigue, and energy

    Is improving your willpower the surest way to a better life?

    A new understanding of how people control themselves has emerged from the past decade of research studies. Self-control depends on a limited energy supply, and each person’s willpower fluctuates during the day as various events deplete and then replenish it.

    The latest laboratory work reveals that decision making and creative initiative also deplete the same willpower supply, while eating and sleeping can restore it – to the extent that a life-changing decision may go in different directions depending on whether it’s made before or after lunch.

    One of the world’s most esteemed psychologists, Roy F Baumeister visits the RSA to explain why willpower and self-control is one of the most important aspects of individual and societal wellbeing.

    Chair: Matthew Taylor, chief executive, RSA

    http://www.thersa.org/events/audio-and-past-events/2012/willpower-self-control,-decision-fatigue,-and-energy

    —Huffduffed by jrsinclair

  6. Professional Subordination - Part 1 | Manager Tools

    This guidance recommends the professional approach to supporting choices you didn’t champion.

    This isn’t a long cast, but it’s an important one. It’s important enough that it probably ought to be in the Career Tools feed as well. We have it here, in Manager Tools, though, because of the importance of this lesson in professionalism for managers. But please, if you’re a smart manager, share this with your team of individual contributors. Help THEM understand it before they make a classic rookie mistake someday.

    Here’s the situation that teaches us this lesson in professionalism. You’re in a meeting with your boss, and you’ve made your case for some new idea. It might be a change in budget, it might be time of your directs spent on something new, or stopping work on something you think is going nowhere. Or, your opinion wasn’t even asked for, but the bottom line is you disagree with the decision that has been made. Your boss overruled you, the decision was made at higher levels and even your boss had no input. Or, you made your case and you lost.

    What’s the professional response? How do you act/react to having your idea overruled or having to enact a decision you disagree with?

    https://www.manager-tools.com/2010/12/professional-subordination-part-1

    —Huffduffed by solarce