sebastienmarion / Sebastien

A librarian based in New York City.

There are four people in sebastienmarion’s collective.

Huffduffed (305)

  1. Demographics and education’s future, with Nathan Grawe

    How will population changes revamp education? The Future Trends Forum met with professor Nathan Grawe, author of a new and definitive book on the topic.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UF0sgQ3Hok&feature=emb_title
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu Dec 5 16:19:03 2019 Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by sebastienmarion

  2. Future Trends Forum #10: economics with Robert Archibald

    Recording of our Future Trends Forum discussion about education economics, with professor Robert Archibald.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7kFCBqWbt8&feature=emb_title
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu Dec 5 16:14:59 2019 Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by sebastienmarion

  3. Eyeo 2014 - Leah Buechley

    Thinking About Making – An examination of what we mean by making (MAKEing) these days. What gets made? Who makes? Why does making matter? || @leahbuechley || @eyeofestival

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    Original video: https://vimeo.com/110616469
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun, 10 Nov 2019 15:26:54 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by sebastienmarion

  4. Evidence Of Racial, Gender Biases Found In Faculty Mentoring

    Research found faculty in academic departments linked to more lucrative professions are more likely to discriminate against women and minorities than faculty in fields linked to less lucrative jobs.

    —Huffduffed by sebastienmarion

  5. TummelVision 44: Stowe Boyd on social cognition, coding, gender and betweenness

    Social philosopher and webthropologist Stowe Boyd joins the TummelVision crew to talk about social cognition, coding gender, and “betweenness.”

    Huffduffed from http://tummelvision.tv/2010/12/03/tummelvision-44-stowe-boyd/

    —Huffduffed by sebastienmarion

  6. Claudia Goldin on Gender Equality in the Labor Market

    The Cornell Program on Ethics & Public Life and the Cornell Department of Economics present a public lecture by Claudia Goldin:

    "A Grand Gender Convergence: Its Last Chapter"

    Claudia Goldin (Harvard) on the gender equality in the labor market.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kgmmPHxe1E
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    download

    Tagged with education

    —Huffduffed by sebastienmarion

  7. Evidence Of Racial, Gender Biases Found In Faculty Mentoring

    Huffduffed from http://www.npr.org/2014/04/22/305814367/evidence-of-racial-gender-biases-found-in-faculty-mentoring

    —Huffduffed by sebastienmarion

  8. Ursula Le Guin & Margaret Atwood - Literary Arts

    Ursula Le Guin begins her lecture with Margaret Atwood by saying, “I emailed Margaret about six weeks or so ago and said, ‘What are we going to talk about?’ and she replied, ‘I expect we will talk about 1) What is fiction?; 2) What is science fiction?; 3) The ones who walk away from Omelas—where do they go?; 4) Is the human race doomed?; 5) Anything else that strikes our fancy.’” The two women proceed to examine these questions and talk through their answers. They delve into their writing processes and motives, creating many humorous analogies for the act of writing, whether they connect it to naked chickens, salted slugs, or dark boudoirs.

    Margaret Atwood is a poet, novelist, short story writer, essayist, and environmental activist. She has written over 40 books and is best known for her fiction, including The Blind Assassin, which won the Man-Booker Prize in 2000. Atwood has used her public profile to advocate for human rights, the environment, and the welfare of writers. She has been president of PEN International and helped found the Writer’s Trust of Canada. As a public intellectual, Atwood is known as a brilliant thinker on a huge range of subjects who has a wry and ironic sense of humor and who is willing to call out platitudes and other forms of lazy thinking.

    Ursula K. Le Guin sold her first story over 50 years ago and has been writing and publishing ever since. Tackling various modes, including realistic fiction, science fiction, high fantasy, children’s literature, screenplays, and essays, her work has challenged traditional understandings of gender roles, politics, race, and identity. She is best known for her fantasy series Earthsea and her science fiction novel The Left Hand of Darkness. She has influenced several generations of writers, including Junot Díaz, Kelly Link, David Mitchell, and Jonathan Lethem. Throughout her career, she has continuously met criticism with courage, causing one critic to note, “It’s been hard for reviewers to cope with Le Guin. She’s often seemed like a writer without a critical context. But that may just mean that the context is still to come.” Among her many honors, Le Guin has received a National Book Award and, most recently, The National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

    If we knew everything ahead of time, we wouldn’t write the book. It would be paint by numbers and there wouldn’t be any discoveries.” – Margaret Atwood

    “Rereading a book is much better than reading it. A good book reread is better than a good book read.” – Ursula Le Guin

    “All doors are doors to the future, if you go into them.” – Margaret Atwood

    https://literary-arts.org/archive/ursula-le-guin-margaret-atwood/

    —Huffduffed by sebastienmarion

  9. Ursula Le Guin at 80

    Writer China Mieville talks to American science fiction writer Ursula Le Guin.

    Le Guin was a trailblazer - writing in the 1960s, her series of books about the adventures of a boy wizard, Ged, included characters of every race and colour. Her fiction has been acutely concerned with politics, portraying worlds destroyed by environmental catastrophe that prefigured modern concerns about global warming, and societies without gender just as modern-day feminism began to take off.

    Featuring contributions and tributes from Iain Banks and Margaret Atwood.

    —Huffduffed by sebastienmarion

  10. How Poker Player Annie Duke Used Gender Stereotypes To Win Matches : NPR

    Annie Duke was often the only woman at the poker table, which influenced the way people saw her - and the way she saw herself. Feeling like an outsider can come at a cost, but also be an advantage.

    http://www.npr.org/2015/09/28/444236895/how-poker-player-annie-duke-used-gender-stereotypes-to-win-matches

    —Huffduffed by sebastienmarion

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