Tagged with “software” (27)

  1. Zeynep Tufekci: Machine intelligence makes human morals more important | TED Talk | TED.com

    Machine intelligence is here, and we’re already using it to make subjective decisions. But the complex way AI grows and improves makes it hard to understand and even harder to control. In this cautionary talk, techno-sociologist Zeynep Tufekci explains how intelligent machines can fail in ways that don’t fit human error patterns — and in ways we won’t expect or be prepared for. "We cannot outsource our responsibilities to machines," she says. "We must hold on ever tighter to human values and human ethics."

    https://www.ted.com/talks/zeynep_tufekci_machine_intelligence_makes_human_morals_more_important

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  2. The Compiler—50 Things That Made the Modern Economy

    Installing Windows might take 5,000 years without the compiler, a remarkable innovation which made modern computing possible. Tim Harford tells a compelling story which has at its heart a pioneering woman called Grace Hopper who – along the way – single-handedly invented the idea of open source software too.

    The compiler evolved into COBOL – one of the first computer languages – and led to the distinction between hardware and software.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04n04cm

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  3. Dame Stephanie Shirley: How Do You Break Into an Industry While Breaking All the Rules? : NPR

    What’s in a name? For tech entrepreneur Dame Stephanie Shirley, bidding contracts under the name "Steve" enabled her to launch and grow a freelance software company with a virtually all-female staff.

    http://www.npr.org/2015/10/02/443437169/how-do-you-break-into-an-industry-while-breaking-all-the-rules

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  4. Why Are Computers 1: A Fairly Deep Yak Shave

    James Coglan talks about the lengthy process of creating Terminus and Faye, thinking through coding, software as argument, maintaining open source projects, JavaScript in web apps, and his upcoming JavaScript testing book.

    http://whyarecomputers.com/1

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  5. “Uncle” Bob Martin - “The Future of Programming”

    How did our industry start, what paths did it take to get to where we are, and where is it going. What big problems did programmers encounter in the past? How were they solved? And how do those solutions impact our future? What mistakes have we made as a profession; and how are we going to correct them. In this talk, Uncle Bob describes the history of software, from it’s beginnings in 1948 up through the current day; and then beyond. By looking at our past trajectory, we try to plot out where our profession is headed, and what challenges we’ll face along the way.

    Robert C. Martin (Uncle Bob) has been a programmer since 1970. He is the Master Craftsman at 8th Light inc, an acclaimed speaker at conferences worldwide, and the author of many books including: The Clean Coder, Clean Code, Agile Software Development: Principles, Patterns, and Practices, and UML for Java Programmers.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecIWPzGEbFc
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 21 Nov 2016 11:33:42 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  6. 47: Sara Soueidan - Ditching Icon Fonts for SVG | Full Stack Radio

    In this episode, Adam talks to Sara Soueidan about the benefits of using SVG over icon fonts, and the best workflow for using SVG in your projects.

    http://www.fullstackradio.com/47

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  7. Second Curve Internet: Bob Frankston

    Bob Frankston spoke at IFTF’s Second Curve Internet Speaker Series on "The Internet and Other Consequences of a Software-defined World." Looking at the Internet as part of a large scale transition to a software-defined world, Frankston considered the Internet’s history in the context of disruptive changes wrought by new digital technologies. In the near future, we’ll need Internet-native policies that provide what Frankston is calling ambient and borderless connectivity. Looking ahead, the concepts behind the Internet constitute a new literacy that frames our understanding of how systems work, much as Copernicus’ solar system let us see the regularities upon which Newton built his physics.

    http://www.iftf.org/reinventthenet #reinventthenet @iftf

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  8. 181: The Cathedral and the Bazaar - ShopTalk

    This week we talk through the essay The Cathedral and the Bazaar. Can ideas and rules written about software development in 1997 apply to working on the web 18 years later? The answer may surprise you.

    http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/181-the-cathedral-and-the-bazaar/

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  9. Gabriella Coleman on the ethics of free software

    Gabriella Coleman, the Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy in the Art History and Communication Studies Department at McGill University, discusses her new book, “Coding Freedom: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Hacking,” which has been released under a Creative Commons license.

    Coleman, whose background is in anthropology, shares the results of her cultural survey of free and open source software (F/OSS) developers, the majority of whom, she found, shared similar backgrounds and world views. Among these similarities were an early introduction to technology and a passion for civil liberties, specifically free speech.

    Coleman explains the ethics behind hackers’ devotion to F/OSS, the social codes that guide its production, and the political struggles through which hackers question the scope and direction of copyright and patent law. She also discusses the tension between the overtly political free software movement and the “politically agnostic” open source movement, as well as what the future of the hacker movement may look like.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2013/01/08/gabriella-coleman-2/

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  10. A conversation with Bruce Schneier - Software Freedom Law Center

    The Software Freedom Law Center provides legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software.

    Join us at Columbia Law School as renowned security expert Bruce Schneier talks with Eben Moglen about what we can learn from the Snowden documents, the NSA’s efforts to weaken global cryptography, and how we can keep our own free software tools from being subverted.

    http://www.softwarefreedom.org/events/2013/a_conversation_with_bruce_schneier/

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