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Tagged with “communication” (2)

  1. Specific Language Impairment - Dorothy Bishop - Life Scientific

    Dorothy Bishop is a world-leading expert in childhood language disorders.

    Since the 1970s, she has been instrumental in bringing to light a little-known language disorder that may affect around two children per class starting primary school.

    ‘Specific Language Impairment’, or SLI, was originally deemed to be the fault of lazy parents who didn’t talk to their children. But through her pioneering studies on twins, Dorothy found a genetic link behind this disorder, helping to overturn these widespread misconceptions.

    Dorothy talks to Jim Al-Khalili about how families react when they discover there’s a genetic basis to their problems, and why this language impairment isn’t as well known as other conditions, like autism and dyslexia.

    A critic of pseudoscience and media misreporting, Dorothy discusses her experiences of speaking out against folk psychology and bad science journalism.

    —Huffduffed by rowlando

  2. Elizabeth Stokoe - The Life Scientific

    Jim Al-Khalili talks to the social psychologist Liz Stokoe about her research as a conversation analyst. Her interest is in the nuances of everyday chit chat but also people going on first dates, the verbal abuse between neighbours at war as well as interviews by the Police with suspected criminals.

    Liz is professor of social interaction at the University of Loughborough and her unusual approach involves collecting and analysing the fine details of hundreds of real, spontaneous conversations as a source of raw data. This is in contrast to more traditional means, used by other psychologists of finding out what people think by asking them directly using surveys and questionnaires.

    Her most recent research has overturned ideas about the best ways to teach people how to communicate, negotiate or deal with confrontation. Role play using actors to stage a scenario, has been seen by many as a gold standard training device. But, Liz says there’s no evidence to show that it works. Her alternative technique is based on her own scientific research and is already being widely used by different organisations from the Police to Mediation services and even hospitals, to help with doctor patient relationships.

    —Huffduffed by rowlando