MASTERS (EP. 1) : LES BEATMAKERS NE SONT-ILS BONS QU’À SE FAIRE ARNAQUER ?

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  1. RB 198: The Community Supported Musician (Rethinking Music VIII)

    Is there room in music industry for middle-class musicians?

    Friend of the show Nancy Baym brought together three career performer/songwriters who all stumbled on the same analogy for how musicians can "make it" in the digital age: that of Community Support Agriculture (CSAs). Kristen Hersh, Zoe Keating, and Erin McKeown discuss what models have worked for them, and the unorthodox ways they've learned to make a living as artists.

    Huffduffed from http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/mediaberkman/2012/04/11/rb-198-the-community-supported-musician-rethinking-music-iix/

    —Huffduffed by t1mmyb

  2. Making Music Changes the Brain

    Dr. Gottfried Schlaug, Director of the Music, Neuroimaging and Stroke Recovery Laboratories, Beth Deaconess Israel Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, talks with host Steve Mencher about the notable differences between the brain of a musician and a non-musician.

    Title: Making Music Changes Brains Speaker: Dr. Gottfried Schlaug Date: April 29, 2010 Running Time: 18:46 minutes

    —Huffduffed by wcgaskins

  3. Jonathan Coulton on music piracy

    Jonathan Coulton, a musician, singer-songwriter, and geek icon, who releases his music under a Non-Commercial Creative Commons License, discusses his thoughts on piracy from an artist’s point of view. Coulton talks about quitting his day job so he could focus on his music. He bypassed the traditional route of becoming a musician, which usually means signing to a record label, and began releasing one song per week on his website. This lead to eventual success, according to Coulton, who now makes his living as a full-time musician by touring and selling his music on his website. The discussion then turns to piracy. Coulton explains why he thinks piracy cannot be stopped and describes what he considers “victimless piracy.” He goes on to discuss the difficulties of addressing piracy issues, especially when taking fairness and practicality into account.

    —Huffduffed by millerdl

  4. Marcus Miller: multi-instrumentalist who’s worked with almost everyone who counts in the music business - The Music Show - 6 November 2010

    And responsible for the sound of Miles Davis's funk album Tutu and bass lines for McCoy Tyner, Luther Vandross, Brian Ferry and numerous soundtracks. From http://www.abc.net.au/rn/musicshow/stories/2010/3058989.htm

    —Huffduffed by theJBJshow

  5. #184: Jack Conte - How to get fans - DIY Musician Podcast

    The biggest thing holding your music back might be YOU! In this episode you’ll hear Jack Conte (of the band Pomplamoose) talk about the importance of creative momentum, the crippling effect of premature self critique, and why you need to put out as much music as possible to create the widest “funnel” for your potential fans. Are you finding more obstacles than inspiration in your music career? Jack will give you a good kick in the pants. It’s a fun and insightful speech, which he delivered as the keynote of 2016’s DIY Musician Conference.

    http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/cdbabypodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/DIYMusicianPodcast_Episode184.mp3 

    http://cdbabypodcast.com/2017/04/184-jack-conte-get-fans/

    —Huffduffed by chasereeves

  6. Sasha Frere-Jones by How Long Gone

    Sasha Frere-Jones is a writer, musician, and music critic living in New York. Chris and Jason chat with him about the recent passing of his ex-wife, sobriety, being both a musician and a music critic, the importance of our loved ones pushing us further, writing his memoir, mixtapes, streaming music, Substack, and why he loves New York.

    www.sashafrerejones.com

    twitter.com/donetodeath

    twitter.com/themjeans

    https://anchor.fm/howlonggone/episodes/132----Sasha-Frere-Jones-ep075u

    —Huffduffed by lach