Tagged with “language” (150)

  1. Things That Come Out of Your Mouth | Tell Me Something I Don’t Know

    Part two of our oral fixation: How to talk to your doctor, marine regurgitations, and texting. The panel:

    Frank Delaney, novelist, podcast host, and “the world’s most eloquent man.” May or may not have had untoward interactions with a horse.

    John McWhorter, Columbia University linguist and host of the Lexicon Valley podcast. Working on his 20th book.

    Mehmet Oz, better known as Dr. Oz, Columbia professor of surgery and TV host; knows how to treat his own bee stings.

    http://tmsidk.com/2016/11/things-that-come-out-of-your-mouth/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Lexicographer Ben Zimmer on the etymology of taking something with a grain of salt.

    A phrase with roots in Ancient Rome has confounded English speakers for centuries.

    Mike Vuolo and Bob Garfield discuss the etymology and history of the phrase with a grain of salt with Wall Street Journal language columnist Ben Zimmer

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2016/03/lexicographer_ben_zimmer_on_the_etymology_of_taking_something_with_a_grain.html

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  3. Science Goes to the Movies: ‘Arrival’ - Science Friday

    Aliens have landed on Earth. Where do they come from, and what do they want? Finding the answer depends on the combined skills of linguist Louise Banks (Amy Adams) and physicist Ian Donnelly (Jeremy Renner). In a story that spans the personal to the planetary, how much does Arrival get right? Xenolinguist Sheri Wells-Jensen and Doug Vakoch of METI (Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligence) International discuss.

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  4. Episode 265: Universal Grammar 2 (featuring Dan Everett and Lynne Murphy) – Talk the Talk

    The biggest idea in linguistics is back on the table.

    Is there such a thing as the Universal Grammar? Do you have to have a human brain to learn language, or is learning a language just like learning anything else? And are one man’s insights into Amazonian languages sufficient to demolish this theoretical edifice?

    Linguists Dan Everett and Lynne Murphy talk to Daniel, Ben, and Kylie on this episode of Talk the Talk.

    http://talkthetalkpodcast.com/265-universal-grammar-2/

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  5. Episode 167: The Language Hoax (featuring John McWhorter) – Talk the Talk

    Does the world look different if you speak a different language?

    Can we tell what someone’s culture is like, just from the structure of their syntax?

    For linguists, the answers are no. And no.

    John McWhorter is the author of “The Language Hoax”, and he tells Daniel and Ben why the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis is the most popular bad idea in linguistics on this episode of Talk the Talk.

    http://talkthetalkpodcast.com/167-the-language-hoax/

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  6. The invisible language of nursery rhymes, on this episode of Lexicon Valley.

    John McWhorter makes linguistic sense of seemingly arbitrary children’s verse.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/lexicon_valley/2016/09/the_invisible_language_of_nursery_rhymes_on_this_episode_of_lexicon_valley.html

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  7. Episode 75: Mixed Languages and Scrambled Eggs | The History of English Podcast

    In this episode, we continue our look at the gradual emergence of Middle English from the linguistic rubble left in the wake of the Norman Conquest. English remained fractured and broken, and foreign influences continued to come in. We explore the changing language of the Peterborough Chronicle. We also examine how a merchant’s failed attempt to buy some eggs shaped the history of the English language.

    http://historyofenglishpodcast.com/2016/03/02/episode-75-mixed-languages-and-scrambled-eggs/

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  8. BBC Radio 4 - Word of Mouth, Steven Pinker on Language

    Professor Steven Pinker joins Michael Rosen and Dr Laura Wright in the studio for a wide-ranging talk about his love of, and life working in, language. Steven is Johnstone Professor of Psychology at Harvard University and he’s come up with some of the biggest and most exciting ideas about language. His books include The Language Instinct, How the Mind Works, and most recently, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b075pz7x

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  9. It’s easier to get people to stop speaking a language than to take it up again. Just ask the Irish. | Public Radio International

    For centuries, colonialists, church leaders and educators discouraged Irish people from using their native tongue. When Ireland won independence, its leaders had no idea just how difficult it would be to bring the language back. Despite that, there’s hope for Irish today.

    http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-03-17/its-easier-get-people-stop-speaking-language-take-it-again-just-ask-irish

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  10. The Shared Sign Language of Martha’s Vineyard | Stuff You Missed in History Class: The Podcast

    By the early 18th century, it was not uncommon for people in Martha’s Vineyard to be deaf from birth. This had a profound effect on the culture of Martha’s Vineyard — and one that went on to influence Deaf culture in the United States as a whole.

    http://www.missedinhistory.com/podcasts/the-shared-sign-language-of-marthas-vineyard/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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