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  1. CHM Live | Ada Lovelace: The Making of a Computer Scientist

    [Recorded March 29, 2019] Augusta Ada King, the Countess of Lovelace, is an iconic figure in our vision of computing’s past for her remarkable work with Charles Babbage and on the possibilities of computing machines. And yet her engagement with computing at a time before the roles and definitions of digital computing emerged has made the characterization of her life and contribution a matter of continued study. The new book, Ada Lovelace: The Making of a Computer Scientist, draws extensively on archival collections at Oxford’s famed Bodleian Library to put Ada Lovelace’s life-long pursuit of mathematics at its center.

    Born into the heights of the British aristocracy, Ada’s passion for mathematics was encouraged by her mother, Lady Byron, who shared it. From private tutors, Ada’s mathematical education continued under one of the leading British mathematicians of her day, Augustus de Morgan. For a decade, starting at the age of eighteen, Ada collaborated with Charles Babbage on his revolutionary computing machinery, adding her own insights. For most of this collaboration, Babbage was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics and the University of Cambridge, the seat once held by Isaac Newton.

    Two of the co-authors of Ada Lovelace: The Making of a Computer Scientist, Ursula Martin and Adrian Rice dis…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UxjkGePZ48
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 09 May 2019 15:55:02 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  2. VCF East 2019 — Brian Kernighan interviews Ken Thompson

    In the 1960s-1970s, Ken Thompson co-invented the UNIX operating system along with Dennis Ritchie at Bell Labs. He also worked on the language B, the operating system Plan 9, and the language Go. He and Ritchie won the Turing Award. He now works at Google. He’ll be interviewed Brian Kernighan of “K&R” fame.

    This talk took place May 4, 2019. Videography courtesy of @thegurumeditation (Facebook), @thegurumeditate (Twitter)

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EY6q5dv_B-o
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 07 May 2019 19:45:56 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  3. Sunday Morning Lightning Talks + Keynote - PyCon 2018

    Keynote Speaker: Brett Cannon

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    Original video: https://t.co/HfD0Plznxr
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 07 May 2019 10:59:44 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  4. Brave Browser

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  5. Radical Candor — The Surprising Secret to Being a Good Boss | First Round Review

    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yODalLQ2lM
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 17 Apr 2019 21:22:14 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  6. Oral History of Leslie Lamport Part 2

    Interviewed by Roy Levin on 2016-11-11 in Mountain View CA, X7884.2017 © Computer History Museum

    Leslie Lamport pioneered many of the foundational principles of distributed computing. In this two-part interview, he discusses his early interest in mathematics, physics, and computing, and the interplay of these subjects that has continued throughout his long career. He provides the context for some of his most famous work, including the Bakery Algorithm, his seminal paper on the use of state machines to maintain coherence in a distributed system, his Paxos distributed agreement protocol, and his techniques for specifying algorithms and verifying their correctness. In several cases, the importance of these ideas was not recognized widely for years – sometimes decades – after they were published, but they have become fundamental to modern distributed computing systems.

    In this interview, Lamport also comments on the opportunities for technical impact that he found by working in corporate research labs while collaborating with colleagues in universities. He talks about the cultures of labs at SRI, Digital Equipment Corporation, and Microsoft that provided the stimulation for his influential ideas and creations.

    • Note: Transcripts represent what was said in the interview. However, to enhanc…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uK9yGNuGWKE
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 16 Apr 2019 19:06:45 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  7. Oral History of Leslie Lamport - Part 1

    Interviewed by Roy Levin on 2016-08-12 in Mountain View CA, X7884.2017 © Computer History Museum

    Leslie Lamport pioneered many of the foundational principles of distributed computing. In this two-part interview, he discusses his early interest in mathematics, physics, and computing, and the interplay of these subjects that has continued throughout his long career. He provides the context for some of his most famous work, including the Bakery Algorithm, his seminal paper on the use of state machines to maintain coherence in a distributed system, his Paxos distributed agreement protocol, and his techniques for specifying algorithms and verifying their correctness. In several cases, the importance of these ideas was not recognized widely for years – sometimes decades – after they were published, but they have become fundamental to modern distributed computing systems.

    In this interview, Lamport also comments on the opportunities for technical impact that he found by working in corporate research labs while collaborating with colleagues in universities. He talks about the cultures of labs at SRI, Digital Equipment Corporation, and Microsoft that provided the stimulation for his influential ideas and creations.

    • Note: Transcripts represent what was said in the interview. However, to enhanc…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXt3-iZpQQc
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 16 Apr 2019 19:02:15 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  8. Don Knuth’s Early Programs

    Interviewed by David C. Brock and Hansen Hsu on 2018-07-19 in Mountain View, CA X8713.2018 © Computer History Museum

    In this interview, Stanford Computer Scientist Donald Knuth discusses some of his earliest efforts as an undergraduate at Case Western Reserve in computer programming while showing related program listings and manuals. During the interview he discusses the following programs:

    Tic-Tac-Toe (Knuth’s first large-scale program, written in IBM 650 assembler, summer 1957), which had three different “brains,” the third of which included an early form of machine learning.

    Runcible I compiler for the IBM 650.

    Case SOAP III (August 1958), an assembler for IBM 650, modified from IBM’s SOAP II (Symbolic Optimum Assembler Program).

    SuperSOAP (August 1959) enhanced version of SOAP III, modified for IBM 653 (which added floating point, index registers, 60 words of core memory, and a RAMAC hard disk).

    Integer Programming Program (April 1960).

    The interviewers are David C. Brock and Hansen Hsu from the Museum’s Software History Center.

    Lot number: X8713.2018 Catalog number: 102738838

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9JOrmgHw28
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 16 Apr 2019 18:55:44 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  9. Oral History of John Backus

    Interviewed by Grady Booch on September 5, 2006, in Ashland, Oregon, X3715.2007

    © Computer History Museum

    John Backus led a team at IBM in 1957 that created the first successful high-level programming language, FORTRAN. It was designed to solve problems in science and engineering, and many dialects of the language are still in use throughout the world.

    Describing the development of FORTRAN, Backus said, "We simply made up the language as we went along. We did not regard language design as a difficult problem, merely a simple prelude to the real problem: designing a compiler which could produce efficient programs … We also wanted to eliminate a lot of the bookkeeping and detailed, repetitive planning which hand coding involved."

    The name FORTRAN comes from FORmula TRANslation. The language was designed for solving engineering and scientific problems. FORTRAN IV was first introduced by IBM in the early 1960s and still exists in a number of similar dialects on machines from various manufacturers.

    • Note: Transcripts represent what was said in the interview. However, to enhance meaning or add clarification, interviewees have the opportunity to modify this text afterward. This may result in discrepancies between the transcript and the video. Please refer to the transcript for further inform…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dDsWTyLEgbk
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 16 Apr 2019 18:52:38 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  10. 1st Keynote by Armin Ronacher

    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4fzFKihmJw
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 11 Mar 2019 14:20:50 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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