rekha6 / Rekha Murthy

At various times in my life I've been a Web producer, public radio producer, mobile content producer, user experience designer. Now, I help people make good podcasts for good reasons.

There are seven people in rekha6’s collective.

Huffduffed (28)

  1. When Patents Attack! | This American Life

    Why would a company rent an office in a tiny town in East Texas, put a nameplate on the door, and leave it completely empty for a year? The answer involves a controversial billionaire physicist in Seattle, a 40 pound cookbook, and a war waging right now, all across the software and tech industries. (Transcript)

    http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/441/when-patents-attack

    —Huffduffed by rekha6

  2. Clay Shirky and Cognitive Surplus

    From Future Tense with John Moe:

    Sometimes at night I’ll wonder what’s on TV. Surf around for a while, not find much, and get on the computer instead. There, I might update Facebook, tweet something on Twitter. And I’ll think, “It didn’t use to be like this.” Time away from work and responsibility used to be passive, we watched TV mutely, we read a book. We didn’t post videos to YouTube or edit Wikipedia. Online culture has meant that instead of just consuming culture, we also create it and share it. We don’t just watch Lost, we watch it and then go on message boards or even make our own videos.

    This is a shift detailed in Clay Shirky’s new book Cognitive Surplus: creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age. He teaches at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU and has been a big thinker on the way we work together online for many many years. We talk to him about what this shift means for society in the long term.

    http://futuretense.publicradio.org/episode/index.php?id=686751198

    —Huffduffed by rekha6

  3. The Marketplace of Ideas | On the North Korean Worldview with B.R. Myers

    In his new book, The Cleanest Race: How North Koreans See Themselves and Why it Matters, Myers examines North Korean propaganda meant for both internal and external consumption and through it constructs the closed country’s view of itself, its relationship to other countries and the Kim dynasty that has controlled it for 60 years.

    —Huffduffed by rekha6

  4. This American Life: Bet Against the American Dream

    "With reporters from the nonprofit journalistic organization ProPublica, [This American Life] told the story of another hedge fund, Magnetar, that gamed the housing bubble. Bankers who worked on Magnetar deals walked away with their huge bonuses well before disaster struck — or, as the program put it, “bankers made money even when they were buying things that eventually blew up the bank.” Not to mention the economy. And it was all legal.

    To award the audience a bonus, “This American Life” concluded with a Broadway song commissioned from a co- author of the satirical musical “Avenue Q.” Titled “Bet Against the American Dream,” it distills a complex financial saga to its essence: Those who shorted the housing market shorted the country." — Frank Rich

    —Huffduffed by rekha6

  5. ‘The Sound of Music’ Turns 45

    "

    On this day in 1965, "The Sound of Music" opened in theaters. It was hugely successful, winning five Academy Awards, including best picture.

    The film's enduring popularity affected the lives of both the real and fictional von Trapps. We talk to Sam von Trapp, grandson of Maria, the singing governess, and to Daniel Truhitte, who played Rolf in the film."

    —Huffduffed by rekha6

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