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redmeades / Rohan Edmeades

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Huffduffed (143)

  1. John Swinton – Becoming Friends of Time (N164)

    John Swinton is a Scottish theologian and founder of the University of Aberdeen’s Centre for Spirituality, Health and Disability. After years of work as a mental health nurse, John became an academic in order to process all that he’d learnt. And my word has he learnt a lot! His book Dementia: Living in the Memories of God, and Becoming Friends of Time are packed full of fascinating and vital insights about what we must learn from people with disabilities about what it means to be human and a disciple of Jesus.

    from: https://www.nomadpodcast.co.uk/john-swinton-becoming-friends-time-n164/

    —Huffduffed by redmeades

  2. Amelia Boone on Beating 99% of Men and Suffering for High Performance

    from: https://tim.blog/2015/12/22/amelia-boone/

    —Huffduffed by redmeades

  3. Episode 51: A Conversation with Tim O’Reilly

    In this episode, Byron and Tim discuss autonomous vehicles, capitalism, the Internet, and the economy.

    from: https://voicesinai.com/episode/episode-51-a-conversation-with-tim-oreilly/

    —Huffduffed by redmeades

  4. Theology and the End of Doctrine with Christine Helmer

    Christine Helmer chats with Tripp about her book Theology and the End of Doctrine. You can check out a sample chapter at WJKbooks.com or just get the book on Amazon.Helmer

    Christine Helmer is Professor of Religious Studies and German at Northwestern University. She is the author of The Trinity and Martin Luther (Zabern 1999) and contributing editor of numerous books on biblical interpretation, historical theology, and contemporary theology, including The Global Luther: A Theologian for Modern Times (Fortress 2009).

    from: https://homebrewedchristianity.com/2014/10/09/theology-and-the-end-of-doctrine-helmer/

    —Huffduffed by redmeades

  5. Holy hot potatoes: Freedom edition

    Australians all let us rejoice, for we are young and free! But how free are we really? James Carleton sits down with an Opus Dei bishop and a Uniting Church theologian to find out what happens when anti-discrimination, freedom of speech and freedom of religion clash.

    In this episode:

    The inverted red crosses at Dark Mofo in Hobart have ruffled a few Christian feathers, but nobody’s taking them down. But is it fair to deliberately antagonise a religious group for the sake of it?

    The ACT has legislated to compel religious institutions to report all allegations of child sexual abuse to the ombudsman — including those made in the confessional. But Catholic clergy say it’s government overreach, and they’d rather go to jail than violate the seal of confession.

    As Ireland votes to allow abortion for the first time since 1861, New South Wales parliament votes to restrict protests in front of abortion clinics.

    So what are Christians morally opposed to abortion supposed to do? And what about Christian feminists?

    The gay wedding cake dilemma pushes the very limits of rights-based discourse. In the US, the Supreme Court ruled one baker — Jack Phillips — is not obliged to bake a cake for a same-sex wedding. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that every baker can withhold service for religious reasons.

    from: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/godforbid/holy-hot-potatoes-freedom-edition/9871266

    —Huffduffed by redmeades

  6. Unfashionable Virtues: Forbearance

    This week, we are continuing with our examination of certain virtues – those character traits and moral habits which were once deemed central to the good life – that have fallen out of favour in our time.

    Forbearance is, it must be acknowledged, an antiquated word, and the sentiment it describes has little purchase on the modern imagination. It is closely related to mercy or clemency, perhaps even patience, just to the extent that it suggests a refusal to pass final judgment on another. It is a suspension of one’s hostility to another.

    In this way, forbearance is less than forgiveness, but considerably greater than mere tolerance. It is not benign coexistence, but the longing for community – and a determination to cultivate the conditions in which that community remains possible. Forbearance, it could be argued, is a form of teleological patience.

    So should forbearance still be considered a virtue in our time? Is it even possible, given that so many of the other commitments that sustain the practice of forbearance have been eroded? Or is forbearance ultimately an undesirable response to a hideously unjust world?

    from: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/theminefield/unfashionable-virtues:-forbearance/9812574

    —Huffduffed by redmeades

  7. Who Makes Cents: A History of Capitalism Podcast — Episode 46: Raj Patel and Jason Moore on Capital, Nature, and Cheap Things

    On the latest episode of Who Makes Cents: A History of Capitalism Podcast, Raj Patel and Jason Moore trace the relationship between capital and the environment through seven cheap things: nature, money, work, care, food, energy, and lives.

    When we think about the relationship between capitalism and the environment, it’s all too easy to see them as separate spheres bouncing into one another — capitalism devouring nature, like when a forest is razed for development, or nature threatening capitalist progress, like when a natural disaster later wipes out that development. Raj Patel and Jason Moore see the relationship as much more complicated, while also arguing that the environmental crises we face today are the inherent products of the way that capitalism operates. They trace the relationship between capital and the environment through seven cheap things: nature, money, work, care, food, energy, and lives.

    from: https://www.versobooks.com/blogs/3863-who-makes-cents-a-history-of-capitalism-podcast-episode-46-raj-patel-and-jason-moore-on-capital-nature-and-cheap-things

    —Huffduffed by redmeades

  8. AI and Religion: An Initial Conversation

    From: https://religiousstudiesproject.com/podcast/ai-and-religion-an-initial-conversation/

    —Huffduffed by redmeades

  9. How To Be Bored And Brilliant, With Manoush Zomorodi

    In this episode we talk to Manoush Zomorodi, host of WNYC’s Note to Self and author of Bored and Brilliant: How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self. Back in 2015, Manoush wondered if being plugged in all the time to a constant stream of entertainment and information actually made our lives worse. She noticed that we’re never bored - and she wondered, what is that lack of boredom doing to us?

    Manoush led her listeners through an experiment to help them unplug - and it was a huge success: After taking part in the experiment listeners reported feeling more creative and productive, and more satisfied with their lives.

    from: https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2017/11/how-to-be-bored-and-brilliant-with-manoush-zomorodi/

    —Huffduffed by redmeades

  10. Radical Theology

    CBC Ideas: a podcast with John Milbank and Catherine Pickstock

    —Huffduffed by redmeades

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