Tagged with “online” (15)

  1. How MetaFilter’s Founder (Successfully) Stepped Away From the Community After 16 Years

    After managing MetaFilter for 16 years, founder Matt Haughey stepped away from the community in 2015, handing the day-to-day operations over to a long time staff member with a small, paid team. More than a year and a half later, Matt stops by Community Signal to reflect on his decision and how it has impacted the community. The transition of power at MetaFilter is our focus on this episode, including what led Matt to realize that it was time for him to go. Plus:

    Why MetaFilter charges $5 for new accounts The time that Matt caught Dilbert creator Scott Adams posting anonymously to praise himself What concerns Matt about the consolidation of power in social media platforms

    Big Quotes

    “I worked at startups, and I didn’t like it. I couldn’t imagine ever running one or feeling comfortable with it. [With MetaFilter], I just wanted to build something that was useful for people and enjoyable, and gave back to the people who participated in it. That was my goal.” -@mathowie

    “[After taking a year to plan his exit from MetaFilter:] Maybe it’s the nature of community managers in general. We’re careful, thoughtful people or else we would have terrible communities. I’m the type of guy that gives three months notice if I leave a job. I don’t want to leave people feeling out of it. The community’s maintained health was my number one priority. It takes a year to pull yourself out of a project when you have tendrils in every aspect of it.” -@mathowie

    “[MetaFilter’s $5 account registration fee] wasn’t really economic. It was definitely just trying to put a hurdle in front of people. … Anytime we [were mentioned] in the press … 500 or 600 people would just funnel in, sign up for an account and find the nearest thread and just start leaving comments. Most of them are just clueless, like ‘What is this site for, why am I here, what the hell is this, I don’t even like the color of it?’ It would just be chaos.” -@mathowie

    “I never wanted a community that was so big, it felt anonymous.” -@mathowie

    “[When people started selling MetaFilter accounts on eBay,] I’m sitting there going like, ‘Boy, this is weird having a black market around my own thing.’ I was railing on the music industry. I was writing blog posts about how it sucks the music industry is vilifying Napster and MP3s like, let me pay for digital music. I remember begging, writing things in 2002 and 2003. … There’d be no Napster if you had 50 cent songs or dollar songs. It would be easier to just pay for them than it would be to track down these MP3s … I remember just thinking, yeah, there’s this black market around MetaFilter. I can get rid of it by just doing what I would ask the music industry to do, which is provide an economic way to do the right thing. There were no more eBay auctions after that because anyone could get [an account] for five bucks.” -@mathowie

    “Scott Adams and Dilbert stuff would come up on MetaFilter from time to time. I don’t even know what tipped me off … but I’d noticed every time there’s a thread about Dilbert or Scott Adams, there’s this weird user with this really bizarre username that’s always there to defend him to the death. He would argue with everybody about what a genius Scott Adams was. … We have PayPal records with some identifiers of your name and email. [I pulled up the account,] and it’s Scott Adams. … Running communities is weird. This stuff comes up from time to time.” – @mathowie

    “The way we think of comments today, as mostly garbage to be ignored and phasing out rapidly in many places, is largely due to the lack of community management.” -@mathowie

    “A zillion newspapers and news sites adopted comments without ever hiring a single person to moderate them or even care to look at them. So they became synonymous with cesspools of nonsense.” -@mathowie

    “I do think we’re just on the cusp of figuring out where the downside is to [consolidating social interaction to a few, powerful platforms]. Like this week, there was news that Facebook’s working on censorship software for China so that controversial articles would, basically, never be seen in China because that’s a requirement of web publishing in China. That’s really disturbing. How could that be applied by any other government or anybody else or anyone at Facebook? Those are things that are super concerning. I don’t know if we’re ever going to return to a rich, lush, open web of thousands of decentralized servers and writers, unfortunately.” -@mathowie

    About Matt Haughey Matt Haughey was one of the pioneers of blogging. In 1999, he started MetaFilter.com as the first blog community and continued to run it until last year. He’s now a writer at Slack, and continues to tinker on dozens of small web projects today. Related Links

    MetaFilter, the community that Matt founded and managed for 16 years Slack, where Matt is a senior writer Slashdot, a social news website and community that inspired Matt Digg, once a social news site, now a news aggregator Managing Online Forums, Patrick’s book Tom Vanderbilt, a New York Times bestselling author who has received inspiration from Ask MetaFilter for his books Alex Goldman, a MetaFilter user who now co-hosts the Reply All podcast for Gimlet Media The WELL, an early, influential online community Matt’s announcement at MetaFilter about moving on Jason Goldman, Chief Digital Officer of the White House, who helped Matt realize it was time to move on Josh Millard, who now manages MetaFilter Matt’s account on MetaFilter

    http://www.communitysignal.com/how-metafilter-transitioned-power-from-the-founder-after-16-years/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. #0026: This Is Haughey Do It

    The evolution of MetaFilter: this week Paul Ford and Rich Ziade talk to Matt Haughey, the founder of MetaFilter, the collection of sites and communities that Paul describes as “one of the real success stories of the web.” The conversation covers Matt’s early career at Pyra Labs, the accessibility of digital technologies, his current job as a writer for Slack, and how if you spend enough time publishing online, you’ll inevitably attract the attention of two groups — trolls and lawyers.

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/postlighttrackchanges/this-is-haughey-do-it
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 17 Aug 2016 01:21:19 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. BBC Radio 4 - Analysis, The End of Free

    Andrew Brown of The Guardian asks if the dramatic rise of ad-blocking software will undermine the commercial model behind most free news on the internet. He finds an industry in deep concern over the "Ad-blockalypse" - with these new programmes meaning that advertisers may refuse to continue to subsidise online news providers if consumers are now no longer seeing their online adverts. Can the industry persuade people to pay for what was previously available at no charge? And if not, can commercial online news services survive?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b072j3g6

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. 245: Build Your Own Platform | seanwes podcast

    Do you really need a website? Do you really need your own domain and a place to call home?

    There are a lot of tools and platforms out there happy to represent you and act as your home. A lot of the hard work of development is taken care of for you. You can just show up, do your thing and be done.

    But it does mean pointing people to those platforms. If you’re telling anyone to go to your profile on these other platforms, you are telling them that’s where your home is.

    This means you are putting your trust and livelihood in platforms that are looking out for their own best interest. They can change the rules, they can change the game, and there’s nothing you can do about it.

    The online world looked very different 10 years ago and you can be sure it will look very different 10 years from now. The only thing that is certain is change. When you build your home on someone else’s platform, you are putting your full trust in them. But they have to look out for their own best interest.

    The only platform you control is your own. When you build and sell on other platforms, you often don’t get the customer data either. You might get more exposure, but without the customer data you can’t build a relationship.

    If you don’t have the customer data to build a relationship, you won’t get repeat buyers. The lifetime value of your customers is going to be very small.

    Yes, the cost of building your own platform is great. But you should also be considering the long-term cost of not building your own platform. What is the price you place on being irrelevant in 10 years?

    http://seanwes.com/podcast/245-build-your-own-platform/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Reply All #27 The Fever

    This week, producer Stephanie Foo tells a story about dating online that is unlike any we’ve ever heard before.

    http://gimletmedia.com/episode/27-the-fever/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Online Comments - a “wicked” problem - Future Tense

    It’s a wicked problem, says social technologist Suw Charman-Anderson. That is, the lack of civility online when people leave comments.

    We tend to blame the poison on so-called "trolls". But does blaming others overlook our own role in reducing standards of online discourse?

    In a two part series, Future Tense looks at the difficulties involved in fostering a genuine online discussion. And we question why so many comment threads quickly deteriorate into the banal, offensive and abusive.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/online-comments---ep/5795478

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. The ‘Nasty Effect’: How Comments Color Comprehension : NPR

    At its best, the Web is a place for unlimited exchange of ideas. But the uncivil discourse that unfolds in comments sections can be poisonous. A study in the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication suggests that rude comments on articles can change the way we interpret the news.

    http://www.npr.org/2013/03/11/174027294/the-nasty-effect-how-comments-color-comprehension

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Erin Kissane podcast interview: editorial strategy, web magazines and trolls

    In Episode 4 of the Together London Podcast, I talk to Erin Kissane about what she learned editing A List Apart magazine, her book The Elements of Content Strategy, why she started Contents Magazine, and what we can do about the problem of harassment online.

    http://lucidplot.com/2012/07/31/kissane-podcast/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Transmedia storytelling

    This week’s episode of the CoP Show explains what transmedia storytelling is and why producers might want to use it.

    The simplest definition of transmedia storytelling is that it is a technique used to tell stories across multiple platforms: TV, radio, games, novels, social media, online or anywhere a story can unfold.

    A transmedia storyteller may create many "entrypoints" across different platforms, so that, for example, a fan of a drama can read the online diaries of their favourite characters or follow their comments on Twitter.

    The theory goes that by doing this not only can you give your audience more of what they want and love but you can also bring in a whole new audience that otherwise would not find your content.

    Joining presenter Simon Smith are Chris Sizemore, Executive Editor of BBC’s Learning & Knowledge Online, Adrian Hon the Chief Creative at transmedia specialist Six to Start and Meg Jayanth, a BBC multi-platform producer.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/academy/collegeofproduction/podcast/view/transmedia-storytelling

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  10. Minimalism and the cult of less - RN Future Tense - 23 June 2011

    A growing number of minimalists are trying to cut down on physical commodities and replace them with digital counterparts. So is it possible to live out of a hard drive? And in future could less definitely be more?

    http://www.abc.net.au/rn/futuretense/stories/2011/3035856.htm

    —Huffduffed by adewale

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