subscribe

psd / Paul Downey

Web guy who one day hopes to make sense of it all.

There are twelve people in psd’s collective.

Huffduffed (80)

  1. Driving Bill Drummond

    Producer Conor Garrett is there to find out. As they cross the Irish border and over each county boundary, Conor is becoming increasingly concerned he may not have a good enough story for his radio programme. It’s a problem further complicated by the fact Bill won’t talk about his chart-topping ’90s pop band who once famously set fire to a very large pile of their own cash. Then, when a narrative arc does eventually develop, Conor can’t be sure how authentic it is. And what’s all this stuff about eels?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05cpm29

    download

    Tagged with klf

    —Huffduffed by psd

  2. BBC Front Row: Lionel Shriver, Radiohead, Richard Linklater, Tate Britain exhibition

    BBC Front Row podcast, broadcast Monday 9 May 2016, including music critic Pete Paphides reviewing A Moon Shaped Pool, the new album from Radiohead and the group’s first since 2011’s The King of Limbs.

    —Huffduffed by psd

  3. BBC Radio - Peter Day’s World of Business, Global Business: Companies without managers

    Who’s your boss? Peter Day asks how three companies, without managers, do business.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03045tx

    —Huffduffed by psd

  4. Admiral Shovel and the Toilet Roll

    It begins to look as if we might have been wrong. All those predictions driving us forward throughout history have brought us finally to the unexpected realisation that the future is, suddenly, no longer what it used to be. Oops.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/burke/

    James Burke is a living legend. Or, as he put it, “No-one under the age of fifty has heard of me and everyone over the age of fifty thinks I’m dead.”

    He is a science historian, an author, and a television presenter. But calling James Burke a television presenter is like calling Mozart a busker. His 1978 series Connections and his 1985 series The Day The Universe Changed remain unparalleled pieces of television brilliance covering the history of science and technology.

    Before making those astounding shows, he worked on Tomorrow’s World and went on to become the BBC’s chief reporter on the Apollo Moon missions.

    His books include The Pinball Effect, The Knowledge Web, Twin Tracks and Circles.

    —Huffduffed by psd

  5. Excessive Enhancement: JavaScript’s Dark Side

    Are we being seduced by the animation and rich UI capabilities of modern browsers at the expense of the underlying platform of the Web?

    The Web has entered a new phase in its evolution: The proliferation of a JavaScript enabled audience with increased processing grunt in their devices, better and more ambitious JavaScript developers, and users with an appetite for sophisticated experiences, all seem to be helping to move the web in a rich and exciting direction.

    Good developers understand about graceful degradation, progressive enhancement, unobtrusive JavaScript and the like, so why are we seeing big companies building web offerings with little apparent thought for their impact on the Web?

    We’ll explore this by looking at what the Web was, is now, and might become. We’ll look at examples of exciting user interfaces and sophisticated interactions. We’ll also examine some emerging techniques for providing rich user interactions without hurting the web or killing kittens.

    Phil Hawksworth, Technical Director, R/GA

    Phil began his career building web applications for financial institutions such as Commerzbank, Deutsche Bank, and the London Stock Exchange in the late nineties. A focus on web architectures and real-time data delivery lead Phil to a variety of web development roles with particular attention to emerging front-end development techniques and JavaScript application development.

    After several years working on web applications and consulting on web best practices at technology companies such as Verisign, VMware and BT, Phil made the move into the agency world where he managed development teams and architected solutions on projects for clients including of eBay, Sony and BP.

    Phil Hawksworth is a Technical Director at R/GA and enjoys talking about himself in the third person.

    —Huffduffed by psd

  6. Mr. Daisey and the Apple Factory | This American Life

    Mike Daisey was a self-described "worshipper in the cult of Mac." Then he saw some photos from a new iPhone, taken by workers at the factory where it was made. Mike wondered: Who makes all my crap? He traveled to China to find out.

    http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/454/mr-daisey-and-the-apple-factory

    —Huffduffed by psd

  7. Cow Clicker Founder: If You Can’t Ruin It, Destroy It : NPR

    Zynga, the company behind popular Facebook games such as Farmville and Cityville, is expected to have its initial public offering before the end of the year. Zynga is a phenomenon. More than 200 million people play its games each month. One person who doesn’t feel Zynga’s success is cause for celebration is video game designer Ian Bogost. Bogost thinks Zynga’s games are mindless, designed to suck money out of players’ pockets. To make his point he created a parody game of his own. As On the Media’s P.J. Vogt reports, what Bogost didn’t expect is that his satire would become one of the most popular games he’s ever made.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/11/18/142518949/cow-clicker-founder-if-you-cant-ruin-it-destroy-it

    —Huffduffed by psd

  8. Excessive Enhancement

    Audio from Phil Hawksworth’s talk at Full Frontal 2011: Excessive Enhancement - Are we taking proper care of The Web?

    "We all love to see exciting and innovative "interface shizzle" driven by JavaScript and the ever increasing rendering capabilities of modern browsers, but are we getting these at the expense of the Web? This talk will explore the good, the bad, and the fugly of rich interfaces, while examining how and why we should take care not to damage the Web."

    http://2011.full-frontal.org/schedule

    —Huffduffed by psd

  9. Robinson Crusoe — In Our Time

    Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss Daniel Defoe’s novel Robinson Crusoe. Published in 1719, it was an immediate success and is considered the classic adventure story - the sailor stranded on a desert island who learns to tame the environment and the native population. Robinson Crusoe has been interpreted in myriad ways, from colonial fable to religious instruction manual to capitalist tract, yet it is perhaps best known today as a children’s story. Melvyn Bragg is joined by Karen O’Brien, Pro-Vice Chancellor for Education at the University of Birmingham; Judith Hawley, Professor of Eighteenth-Century Literature at Royal Holloway, University of London and Bob Owens, Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the Open University.

    —Huffduffed by psd

  10. Macromolecules — In Our Time

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the giant molecules that form the basis of all life. Macromolecules, also known as polymers, are long chains of atoms which form the proteins that make up our bodies, as well as many of the materials of modern life. We’ve only known about macromolecules for just over a century, so what is the story behind them and how might they change our lives in the future? Melvyn Bragg is joined by Athene Donald, Professor of Experimental Physics at the University of Cambridge; Charlotte Williams, Reader in Polymer Chemistry and Catalysis at Imperial College London and Tony Ryan, Pro-Vice Chancellor for the Faculty of Science at the University of Sheffield.

    —Huffduffed by psd

Page 1 of 8Older