The Hacker’s Guide to the Galaxy

Possibly related…

  1. Science Hack Day San Francisco on the BBC World Service

    Sometimes a fresh pair of eyes on a problem can give us an important new perspective on it, but it is not often that scientists veer out of their very specialised fields to see their work through other people’s eyes. But 100 people, from a mix of different backgrounds, have just descended on San Francisco for Science Hack Day. They joined forces, shared skills, and spent 24-hours together, in the hope of finding new ways to use established technologies, and new ways to get information from existing data. Kate Arkless went to find out what a Science Hack Day is all about.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Mash My Flex Up

    Can you ever go back to Ajax once you Web 2.0 with Flex 2.0?

    The Flex 2 framework and the Eclipse-based Flex Builder 2 IDE provide you with a superior development workflow for creating web applications. You can create rich user interfaces quickly by using features such as data binding, application states, custom components, effects, and transitions.

    Join Aral Balkan, the Lone Ranger of the Flash Platform at dConstruct, as he shows you how easy it is to use open data, consume web services and create mashups in Flex 2 by using open source ActionScript 3 libraries for Flickr, Mappr, Odeo, and YouTube.

    Warning: This session may alter your preconceptions about the Flash Platform.

    http://2006.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  3. The Joy of API

    Over the course of dConstruct, you’re going to hear plenty about APIs from the people providing them: Yahoo!, Amazon, etc. But why should you, as a developer, be interested?

    Come on a journey with Jeremy Keith as he describes how much fun can be had from hacking around with open data. Listen to his experiences of experimenting with mashups. Find out how Web Services can rekindle the passion in your code.

    After some initial foreplay describing the differences between REST and SOAP, join Jeremy as he penetrates some code. Soon you’ll be swinging with Amazon, Flickr, and Google Maps.

    http://2006.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. The Flower, the Field, and the Stack

    The interconnectedness of all things, or finding compassion in TCP/IP.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/hammersley/

    Ben Hammersley is the Prime Minister’s Ambassador to Tech City, but don’t hold that against him. He’s really quite a fascinating and charming gent and not at all a smarmy politician.

    When he’s not running marathons in the Sahara desert, Ben is a writer, broadcaster and journalist. He reports on the effects of the internet on society, foreign policy, business, and culture …not just on his blog either; his writing has appeared in proper dead-tree publications like The Times, The Guardian, and Wired UK (where he is Editor at Large).

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  5. Cure for the Common Code

    Breaking down the barriers of web publishing by embracing the rise of code education.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/lukas/

    Jenn Lukas is a kick-ass web dev working with the mighty Happy Cog in Philadelphia. As well as speaking at conferences like JSConf, she writes for The Nerdary and has a regular column in .net magazine.

    Jenn is crazy about sports. She’s also crazy about cheese. Sometimes she combines the two.

    When she’s not crafting sites with the finest of web standards, Jenn teaches HTML and CSS for GirlDevelopIt. She is also a world authority on the bloody mary.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  6. The Save Button Ruined Everything: Backing Up Our Digital Heritage

    Jason Scott is a man on a mission — save all the things.

    But what does “save” mean in the modern world, in the waterfall of personal and private data, and where do we even begin? Turning on the history-o-matic, Jason provides a backdrop to our attempts to “save”, what has been done, and what we can do. The talk will be fast-paced and loud, like a hard drive at the end of its life.

    http://2012.dconstruct.org/conference/scott/

    Jason Scott is a force of nature, tirelessly dedicated to preserving our digital history, from old-school game manuals to the latest social networking sites hell-bent on sucking our collective culture into “the cloud.”

    He is also a documentary film maker. He made BBS: The Documentary and Get Lamp, all about text adventure games.

    In the run-up to the destruction of Geocities, Jason set up Archive Team, a collective of volunteers who back up first and ask questions later. He now works for the Internet Archive, though he is at pains to point out that he does not speak for them.

    And yet, despite all his achievements, Jason will probably never be as well-known as his cat Sockington, who has over a million followers on Twitter.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  7. Web Services for Fun and Profit

    Over the last year the Yahoo! Developer Network has opened up dozens of sites and services to external software developers, with APIs for Yahoo! Search, Flickr, del.icio.us, Yahoo! Maps, and many others. More recently Yahoo! has started adopting microformats on Yahoo! Local and upcoming.org.

    Simon and Paul will be peeking behind the Yahoo! firewall, showing how these services are created and discussing some of the lessons learned in releasing them to the public. They will also show how a company can make use of web services internally to solve real-world technical problems, encourage innovation, and make work more enjoyable.

    http://2006.dconstruct.org/podcast/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct