Tagged with “podcast” (56)

  1. How to grow a blog and remain true to your audience - Chris Coyier (CSS-Tricks & CodePen) | Hacking UI

    It is our pleasure to present to you Chris Coyier. Chris started his journey writing blogs he didn’t enjoy, and eventually realized that his passion was actually in coding the blogs and crafting the CSS behind them. He eventually closed down all of his blogs except one, and CSS-Tricks was born. His blog is now one of the largest front-end development blogs in the world and paved the way for his platform, CodePen, which allows developers to share demos of front-end code while inspecting the code at the same time.

    Chris is also the host of the podcast, ShopTalk, speaks at conferences around the world, and this year he published his second book, Practical SVG, which is all about using SVG on the web. In this episode, Chris discusses his strategies for blog growth, valuable tips for monetization, the proper etiquette for sharing sponsored content, and much more.

    This is the twelfth episode of the second season of the Hacking UI podcast, ‘Scaling a Side Project’. In this season we interview designers, developers, and creative entrepreneurs who built and scaled successful side projects that we admire.

    http://hackingui.com/podcast/chris-coyier-css-tricks/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. How the Irish created the great wines of Bordeaux (and elsewhere)

    I confess, quaffing a Lynch-Bages or a snifter of Hennessy, I have wondered how it is that such fine upstanding Irish names come to be associated with cognac and claret. There my wonderings ended, until a recent visit to Ireland, where, in Cork and Kinsale, I found answers. Starting in the 17th century an intrepid band of Irish emigrants set out first for France, then the rest of Europe, and ultimately almost anywhere wines are made. And almost everywhere they went, the Irish diaspora had an impact on wine-making that belies the idea that the Irish know only about beers.

    The story is a complex one, built on tarriff wars, free trade and political union, with a touch of religious persecution thrown in for good measure.

    Sound familiar?

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/how-the-irish-created-the-great-wines-of-bordeaux-and-elsewhere/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. A brief history of Irish butter

    Podcast: Play in new window | Download The Butter Museum in Cork, Ireland, features on some lists of the world’s quirky etc. food museums but not others. It ought to be on all of them. This is a seriously interesting museum for anyone who likes butter, and in my book, that means just about everyone. (I refuse absolutely to say anything about the impact – if any – of butter on health, not least because there’s nothing certain one can say.) It sits next to the grand Butter Exchange, built when the Cork Butter Market sat like a colossus astride the global market. The Irish butter traded through Cork was done in by refrigeration, fell to the lowest level possible, and then emerged again after Ireland joined the European Union, by returning to the principles that made the Cork Butter Exchange great. The Butter Museum tells the whole story. This episode tells a bit of it.

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/a-brief-history-of-irish-butter/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. When is a zucchini not a zucchini?

    People accused me of being a tease when I originally published that banner photograph up there and said that it was not a zucchini. It was, I admit, a deliberate provocation. It all depends on whether we’re speaking English or Italian. Because in English it isn’t, strictly speaking, a zucchini. It is a cocozelle, a type of summer squash that differs from a zucchini in a couple of important ways, one being that it hangs onto its flower a lot longer. So a flower on a cocozelle is not the guarantee of freshness that it is on a true zucchini. In Italian, however, it is a zucchini. Or rather, a zucchina. Because in modern Italian, all summer squashes are zucchine.

    Teresa Lust is a linguist and food writer. Harry Paris is a plant breeder who specialises in pumpkins, melons and the like. Together, they have just published a paper that pushes back the known history of the zucchini. They guided me through the somewhat convoluted history of true pumpkins in Italy.

    It’s a story of exploration, aristocracy and promiscuity. What more could you want?

    http://www.eatthispodcast.com/when-is-a-zucchini-not-a-zucchini/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Troika #25: Valentines Edition

    —Huffduffed by hickensian

  6. Troika #24: Dearly Departed

    A bit of a delay in getting to this episode. I’ve hesitated over whether to do a full-on Bowie tribute as there are so many brilliant tributes already. It almost felt like jumping on the bandwagon. Instead I’ve bided my time, and its now evolved into a tribute to three people who’ve died too early in 2016: Lemmy Kilmister, David Bowie and Terry Wogan.

    —Huffduffed by hickensian

  7. Troika #23: Best of 2015

    Its an end of year list! Only shorter! This three-piece won’t take long to read or listen to, but it took me a very long time to choose just three from so much wonderful music in 2015. To make it easier, I excluded any music that has already featured in Troika.

    So without further ado, my three most-played are: ‘Satellites’ by Mew, ‘Repetition’ by Purity Ring and ‘Winter Dress’ by The Amazing

    —Huffduffed by hickensian

  8. Troika #22: A Hickensian Christmas II

    Ho Ho Ho, Part 2! Here we have another episode of Chrimbo tunes, this time with traditional songs covered by modern bands. These sound a bit more atmospheric compared last weeks more jaunty tunes!

    ‘Once in Royal David’s City’ - Sufjan Stevens My favourite carol, performed in a plinky-plonky piano style by Sufjan Stevens (again!). Achingly beautiful

    ‘Little Drummer Boy’ - Low Low specialise in a genre called ‘Slowcore’, and their ‘Christmas’ album from 2000 is a mix of upbeat ditties like ‘Just like Christmas’ to the really rather dark ‘Long Way Around the Sea’. This cover of the traditional favourite is somewhere in the middle.

    ‘The First Noel’ - Over the Rhine I first saw Ohio’s finest back in 1992 and immediately became a fan. This is taken from their first Christmas album ‘The Darkest Night of the Year’ from 1996, but they recently released a second called ‘Blood Oranges in the Snow’. This is probably my favourite piece of Christmas music - one for Christmas Eve by the fire.

    Intro music is ‘Adultery at Christmas’ by Mr B The Gentleman Rhymer

    Have a very Happy Christmas!

    —Huffduffed by hickensian

  9. Troika #21: A Hickensian Christmas

    There’s so many decent Christmas songs, that one Troika isn’t going to be enough! So I’ve split them over two episodes – maybe more if I pull my finger out!

    ‘Oh Santa!’ – Mr B The Gentleman Rhymer While not strictly ‘explicit’ (there’s no swearing), it is a rather rum tale that minors may find disturbing. Mr B is the inventor of ‘Chap Hop’, a delightful blend of hip hop and chapness. ‘Get behind me Santa!’ – Sufjan Stevens Sufjan is the King of the Christmas song, if you need a good Christmas music that isn’t cheesy (at least unintentionally) you can’t go wrong with his many covers of traditional songs and original Xmas tunes. This one is a conversation between an Anti-Santa curmudgeon, and Santa himself. “I don’t care about what you say, Santa Claus You’re a bad brother breaking into people’s garage”

    ‘A Snowflake Fell (and it felt like a kiss)’ – Glasvegas After two songs played for chuckles, this Troika ends with a more serious tone from Glasgows’ Glasvegas. This is the title track from the Christmas EP, and I love this song, but I particularly put it here as its one of Leigh’s favourites! More crimbo musicality next week!

    (The intro music is ‘Winter Wonderland’ by Lew Stone & His Band)

    —Huffduffed by hickensian

  10. Troika #20: Take it Slow

    This time its all about taking it slow. Songs or pieces of music that either sound better, or take on a new form, when slowed down.

    ‘Feel it all Around’ by Washed Out Ernest Greenes’ project ‘Washed Out’ take the backing from Gary Low’s 1983 single ‘I Want You’ and slows it to nice laid back pace, creating this lovely slurry sound. I’m told this is also the theme to the TV Series Portlandia, but I haven’t seen that yet.

    ‘How do I make you’ by The Chipmunks To record Chipmunks versions of songs, they have to be sung at a slower pace, so that when sped up, both the pitch and length is correct. So what happens when you slow the whole back down to the pace of the original vocal? Sludgepop! There’s loads more on Soundcloud (https://soundcloud.com/alvin-thechipmunkson16sp). Check out ‘My Sharona in particular - I just felt it was a bit long for this episode,especially when you see how long the last track is…

    The Jurassic Park Theme - 1000% slower Drawn out to almost an hour, John Williams’ theme to Jurassic Park is a beautiful ambient drone epic!

    In this episode I also mention about how Hans Zimmer’s soundtrack for Inception was inspired by the slowed down version of Edith Piafs’ "Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien”, a musical motif used throughout the story. More on that here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVkQ0C4qDvM.

    —Huffduffed by hickensian

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