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portenkirchner / collective

There are eight people in portenkirchner’s collective.

Huffduffed (4766)

  1. Feet on the Ground, Eyes on the Stars: The True Story of a Real Rocket Man with G.A. “Jim” Ogle – User Defenders podcast : Inspiring Interviews with UX Superheroes.

    G.A. “Jim” Ogle fell in love with airplanes at the early age of 8 years old. The circumstances that presented this initial passion were far from ideal.

    He was recovering in a hospital bed following a 7-hour surgery to essentially re-attach his badly mangled right leg from a horrible school bus wreck. He awoke from the operation to see a model airplane hanging down from a wooden structure over his bed that was to be used as a traction device to slowly pull his left leg back into place. It was broken at the hip and rammed almost three inches into his lower torso.

    His injuries would prevent him from being a pilot in the Air Force. But this reality would not deter him from being in the air with airplanes because 12 years later he became involved in space with missiles and rockets on his first job at Cape Canaveral, Florida in 1958. This was the beginning of his 51-year career of being associated with every manned moon mission and all 135 Space Shuttle missions. He finally got his layoff notice along with 8,000 other space workers following the final Shuttle mission, STS-135, in July 2011.

    He likes to tell folks questioning his unusual longevity in this field that he was fortunate to be “in the right place at the right time and the right age.” He considers himself blessed for having had the opportunity to be a part of this truly exciting time in America’s beginnings in space.

    Fun fact: Jim requires 10 lemons and multiple servings of tartar sauce with every seafood meal. The last lemon squeeze after the meal is used to clean his hands!

    https://userdefenders.com/podcast/feet-on-the-ground-eyes-on-the-stars-the-true-story-of-a-real-rocket-man-with-g-a-jim-ogle/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Algorithms to Live By (Brian Christian at Designers + Geeks)

    Our site: https://designersandgeeks.com ————- Finding an apartment (or a partner), deciding whether to eat at our favorite restaurant or try something new, managing our messy desks and scheduling our time: we think of these as uniquely human problems. They’re not. Deep, fundamental parallels exist between these dilemmas and some of the canonical problems in computer science—which gives us an opportunity to learn something about how to make better decisions in our own lives.

    Brian Christian is the coauthor, with Tom Griffiths, of Algorithms to Live By, a #1 bestseller, and the author of The Most Human Human, a New York Times Editors’ Choice, Wall Street Journal bestseller, and New Yorker favorite book of the year. Christian’s writing has appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Wired, The Wall Street Journal, The Paris Review, and in scientific journals such as Cognitive Science, and has been translated into eleven languages. He has appeared on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Charlie Rose Show, and Radiolab, and has lectured at Google, Facebook, Microsoft, the Santa Fe Institute, and the London School of Economics. He lives in San Francisco.

    DESIGNERS + GEEKS EVENTS We host monthly events like this in San Francisco, New York, and Boston. Sign up for our newsletter to be notified when …

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKYlmJVI_DA
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 07 Dec 2017 10:13:05 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Collaboration on Digital Projects - Interview with Ellen De Vries of Clearleft

    Ellen De Vries, Content Strategist at Clearleft, and author of Collaborate: Bring people together around digital projects joins us to talk about collaboration.

    http://www.creativeagencypodcast.com/ellen-de-vries/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. 254 - The Hobos of Iceland

    Comedians Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds examine the hobos of Iceland while in a hotel room on Iceland.

    EPISODE SOURCE: The Little Book of The Icelanders in The Old Days by Alda Sigmundsdóttir

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  5. 252 - Icelandic History - Live from Reykjavik

    Comedians Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds are joined by Icelandic comedian Hugeikur Dagsson - dagsson.com

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  6. So a Monkey and a Horse Walk Into a Bar | This American Life

    Blurring the line between animal and human.

    https://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/631/so-a-monkey-and-a-horse-walk-into-a-bar

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Brian Eno: The Long Now - The Long Now

    The Long Now

    Brian told the origins of his realizations about the "small here" versus the "big here" and the "short now" versus the "long now."

    He noted that the Big Here is pretty well popularized now, with exotic restaurants everywhere, "world" music, globalization, and routine photos of the whole earth.

    Instant world news and the internet has led to increased empathy worldwide.

    But empathy in space has not been matched by empathy in time.

    If anything, empathy for people to come has decreased.

    We seem trapped in the Short Now.

    The present generation enjoys the greatest power in history, but it appears to have the shortest vision in history. That combination is lethal.

    Danny Hillis proposed that there’s a bug in our thinking about these matters—-about long-term responsibility.

    We need to figure out what the bug is and how to fix it.

    We’re still in an early, fumbling phase of doing that, like the period before the Royal Society in 18th-century England began to figure out science.

    Tim O’Reilly gave an example of the kind of precept that can emerge from taking the longer-term seriously.

    These days shoppers are often checking out goods (trying on clothes, etc.) in regular retail stores but then going online to buy the same goods at some killer discount price.

    Convenient for the shopper, terrible for the shops, who are going out of business, hurting communities in the process.

    The aggregate of lots of local, short-term advantage-taking is large-scale, long-term harm.

    Hence Tim’s proposed precept, now spreading on the internet: "Buy where you shop."

    Ie. When you shop online, buy there.

    When you shop in shops, buy there.

    Four simple words that serve as a reminder to head off accumulative harm.

    Leighton Read observed that imagining the future is an acquired skill, and comes in stages.

    An infant can’t imagine the next bottle, or plan for it.

    A teenager can at most imagine the next six months, and only on a good day; on a rowdy Saturday night, Sunday morning is too remote to grasp.

    For us adults the distant future is still unimaginable.

    One thing that Leighton likes about the 10,000-year Clock project is that it lets you imagine a particular part of the very remote future—-the Clock ticking away in its mountain—-and then you can widen your scope from there, to include climate change over centuries, for example.

    Alexander Rose suggested that we should collect examples where a small effort in the present pays off huge in the long term.

    Tim O’Reilly would like to see us develop a taxonomy of such practices.

    Brian’s talk Friday night at Fort Mason was a smashing affair.

    Some 750 people were pried into the Herbst Pavillion, while 400-500 had to be turned away.

    Eno evidently attracts the sweetest, brightest people—-everyone was polite and helpful and patient.

    The only publicity for the lecture had been email forwarded among friends and posted on blogs, plus one radio show (Michael Krasny’s "Forum").

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02003/nov/14/the-long-now/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Understanding the basics, with Jonathan Snook | Fixate

    Published Nov 30, 2017

    Jonathan is the creator of the influential SMACSS methodology for writing scalable and modular C-S-S. He has worked his magic at Xero, Yahoo!, and Shopify, and has appeared on stage at conferences such as Generate, CSSConf, and the Smashing Conference. With 3 highly-acclaimed books, Jonathan has - a - knack for influencing devs around the world and earning the respect of the top people in the industry.

    Time Stamped Show Notes

    1:56 – Everything feels like an evolution of what came before. Jonathan loves the creativity and design of his work, rather than all the new things that will inevitably come out.

    4:48 – Recognising when you’re not behaving ok is the beginning of how to create an environment where everyone can do the best work they can do.

    6:04 – Jonathan loves Vim. He mentions that there are editors like Atom or Microsoft’s Visual Studio Code that bring a lot to the table, but Vim is his comfort zone. Likewise, when it comes to using Git, he is most comfortable with the command line.

    7:20 – Jonathan likes the ease of use that tools like MAMP being, where running an installer will set up your environment, and there’s very little configuration after that.

    8:02 – Procrastination or “busy work” gets in the way of getting work done. Blocking out social media using the Self Control app helps Jonathan to focus and get into a state of flow.

    10:03 – Larry mentions that he uses a Chrome extension, Kill News Feed, that blocks his Facebook feed.

    10:10 – Jonathan has started reading Deep Work by Cal Newport.

    10:49 – Jonathan has written a blog post in which he describes his approach to learning.

    First level: just take everything in

    Second level: implement an idea that you’ve discovered during a project. If you don’t get the opportunity to try something out on a project, come up with your own project and test out your ideas

    Last phase: teach people what you’ve learnt.

    Check out the full post here

    12:46 – To get to an implementation stage Jonathan will come up with his own projects that take a few hours that allow him to test out one idea and understand things better.

    14:44 – Jonathan explains the importance of understanding the basics. Because of all the libraries and frameworks available, people tend to jump into things at a higher abstraction level. Because he learnt to code before those things existed, he was forced to learn the underlying concepts first. He believes he is a better developer for it.

    15:05 – Jonathan contrasts his learning experience with devs who start with Rails and the built in ORM – he learned by writing SQL queries directly. Jonathan feels the need to understand datasets, joins, and the underlying concepts about how things are done.

    16:09 – Having the underlying knowledge allows Jonathan to write better code

    Quickfire Questions

    17:16 – Best advice about programming

    Understand the basics.

    17:29 – Habits for writing better code

    Good sleep and proper rest help you write better code.

    17:52 – BookScalable and Modular Architecture for CSSDesign Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software by The Gang of Four

    18:52 – Inspiring devsChris Coyier. Not only is he a genuinely nice guy, but he also does a lot of great work and pumps out great content.

    19:41 – How to learn code from scratch

    Jonathan says that the best way for him to learn is to have a project. If he had to learn to program from scratch, he would pick up a project and start with the basics.

    20:55 – How to work smart

    Stay focused, whether it’s by blocking out social media or using time management tools like the Pomodoro technique.

    Tools, Tips, and Books Mentioned

    Vim

    Atom

    Visual Studio Code

    Docker

    Vagrant

    MAMP

    Self Control

    Kill News Feed

    Deep Work

    Rails

    SMACSS

    Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software

    Contact Jonathan

    twitter: @snookca

    website: snook.ca

    http://fixate.it/podcast/understanding-the-basics-jonathan-snook/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Presentable #35: Promoting Yourself as a Designer (And the History of Dribbble) - Relay FM

    My old friend Dan Cederholm joins the show. His work at Simplebits was profoundly influential in the early web, but he may be best known as the cofounder of Dribbble. We talk about this history of that community as well as what it’s like to build a reputation as a designer today.

    https://www.relay.fm/presentable/35

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. David Weinberger: “Everything is Miscellaneous” | Talks at Google

    Author David Weinberger discusses his book "Everything Is Miscellaneous" as part of the Authors@Google series. David Weinberger is the co-author of the international bestseller "The Cluetrain Manifesto" and the author of "Small Pieces Loosely Joined". A fellow at Harvard Law School’s Berkman Center for the Internet and Society, Weinberger writes for such publications as Wired, The New York Times, Smithsonian, and the Harvard Business Review and is a frequent commentator for NPR’s All Things Considered. This event took place May 10, 2007 at Google Headquarters in Mountain View, CA.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43DZEy_J694
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 27 Nov 2017 17:29:36 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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