plindberg / tags / web

Tagged with “web” (35)

  1. Putting the Fun in Functional: Applying Game Mechanics to Social Software – Amy Jo Kim, ShuffleBrain

    Taking Amy Jo Kim’s principles to heart, it’s possible to make even the most productive social interactivities "fun." We already knew we could lose track of time and become immersed in our work but now we know how to help others fall into "flow". Kim reviews three case studies of social media—YouTube, Twitter and FaceBook — implementing specific qualities of game mechanics.

    http://www.baychi.org/calendar/20080408/#1

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  2. Mark Boulton — Designing grid systems | Web Directions

    Slides here: http://www.webdirections.org/resources/mark-boulton-designing-grid-systems/#slides

    Grid sys tems have been used in print design, archi tec ture and inte rior design for gen­er a tions. Now, on the web, the same rules of grid sys tem com po si tion and usage no longer apply. Content is viewed in many ways; from RSS feeds to email. Content is viewed on many devices; from mobile phones to lap tops. Users can manip u late the browser, they can remove con tent, resize the can vas, resize the type faces. A designer is no longer in con trol of this pre sen ta tion. So where do grid sys tems fit in to all that?

    About Mark Boulton Mark Boulton is a graphic designer from the UK. He’s worked in Sydney, London and Manchester as an Art Director for clients such as the BBC, T-Mobile, British Airways, and Toyota. Mark now runs his own design studio, Mark Boulton Design. A stickler for applied typographic and design theory, Mark is an active member of the International Society of Typographic Designers and writes a design journal at markboulton.co.uk.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/mark-boulton-designing-grid-systems/

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  3. Grant Robinson – Visualising the user experience | Web Directions

    Designing for dynamic web applications and mobile devices poses a new set of challenges. Web designers are increasingly being asked to apply their skills to where the page model no longer applies. We need new ways of exploring the user experience and communicating behaviours involving sub-page changes and movement.

    Enter rapid prototyping. Widely acclaimed as one of the best ways to create great user experiences, it isn’t without its own pitfalls. This session will discuss the pros and cons of different prototyping techniques, and introduce a new technique called “screenflows” that focuses on visualising the user experience. Discover how to combine the best of paper prototyping, wireframes and HTML prototyping into one simple and effective prototyping technique. Learn how using this method can dramatically decrease the need for documentation, while increasing the speed and agility of the development process.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/grant-robinson-visualising-the-user-experience/

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  4. Luke Stevens – Data driven design | Web Directions

    Far from being the enemy, data can be a designer’s best friend. So much so that it just might be the backbone of the next evolution of web design. Data doesn’t mean less creativity and experimentation, it means more. We’ve learned how to design sites that look good, and we know how to mark up our pages with web standards. Now it’s time to figure out what performs best.

    In this session you’ll learn not just the fundamental concepts of this ‘new web design’, but how you can get started with data-driven design using free tools that are available right now. If you’ve reached a point where you know how to design and build attractive, standards-based web sites and are wondering what comes next, this is the session for you.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/luke-stevens-data-driven-design/

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  5. Suze Ingram – Would you like service design with that? | Web Directions

    Service design is a new discipline which focuses on understanding what customers want, then designing services which meet their needs. Sound familiar? Web designers have focused on user-centred design for years to create websites and applications that are user friendly.

    Service design is well established in Europe and North America and there’s already a handful of Australian businesses offering service design. What is it? Does experience in designing for screen interaction translate to designing services too? Will service design be the next big thing? Suze offers insight by drawing on her years of experience as a UX designer and researcher. She shows how service design might fit into your business in the future, who you might pitch it to, and what sort of skills you might need to deliver service design.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/suze-ingram-would-you-like-service-design-with-that/

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  6. Christian Crumlish – Designing social interfaces | Web Directions

    Designing for social interaction is hard. People are unpredictable, consistency is a mixed blessing, and co-creation with your users requires a dizzying flirtation with loss of control. Christian will present the dos and don’ts of social web design using a sampling of interaction patterns, design principles and best practices to help you improve the design of your digital social environments.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/christian-crumlish-designing-social-interfaces/

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  7. Matt Webb – Opening keynote: Escalante | Web Directions

    The long run to the turn of the millennium got us preoccupied with conclusions. The Internet is finally taken for granted. The iPhone is finally ubiquitous computing come true. Let’s think not of ends, but dawns: it’s not that we’re on the home straight of ubicomp, but the beginning of a century of smart matter. It’s not about fixing the Web, but making a springboard for new economies, new ways of creating, and new cultures.

    The 21st century is a participatory culture, not a consumerist one. What does it mean when small teams can be responsible for world-size effects, on the same playing field as major corporations and government? We can look at the Web - breaking down publishing and consuming from day zero - for where we might be heading in a world bigger than we can really see, and we can look at design - playful and rational all at once - to help us figure out what to do when we get there.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/matt-webb-opening-keynote-escalante/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  8. Kelly Goto – WorkFLOW | Web Directions

    Shift your thinking, alter your process, and create a dynamic of doing rather than spinning. Workflow veteran Kelly Goto leads you through a fast-paced session designed to help transcend obstacles and develop a culture of adaptation, progress and flow. Learn the fundamental principles behind The FLOW Method, an actionable series of steps utilizing new processes and techniques to re-invigorate your organization and team. Whether you are an independent, small business owner or the manager of an in-house web marketing team, you will gain valuable insights and tools to bring back to your organization.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/kelly-goto-workflow/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  9. Building A Brand That Matters | Tony Hsieh, Zappos.com | Web 2.0 Conference

    In this presentation at the Web 2.0 Conference, Zappos.com CEO Tony Hsieh talks about his first business selling pizza in college, starting Link Exchange after college, and how he eventually ended up leading Zappos as the CEO. Tony discusses how his experience at Link Exchange influenced him to focus on corporate culture as a top priority, and why he thinks culture is so important to a company’s future growth and success.

    Tony talks about the internal vision of Zappos not just to be an Internet footware merchant, but to be a brand that is known for an excellent customer experience. He goes on to list a number of specific techniques that the company uses to enhance customer service, and explains why he thinks that the telephone is still one of the best branding devices available.

    How do you define culture? Tony talks about some of the core values of Zappos, and why it’s important to have values that aren’t just a plaque on a wall. These values permeate every aspect of the company, and Tony details some of the hiring and training practices that Zappos uses to ensure that every employee fits into the corporate culture.

    http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail3976.html

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  10. Discovering & Mining The Everyday – Richard Ziade & Tim Meaney

    In our world today, machines are an indelible part of our everyday lives. We rely on powerful devices to help us find information, organize our lives and make decisions. What if all these machines that help us in our everyday lives actually “listened” to our actions? One of the most challenging aspects of the Semantic Web is introducing its concept and benefits to the everyday population. But do we really have to?

    In this talk, Arc90 partners Richard Ziade and Timothy Meaney contrast the way we make discoveries today – by testing theories within controlled environments – to a world where correlations can be discovered by simply peering into and querying data gathered out of our everyday actions.

    From http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/ia-summit-09-day-2

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