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Tagged with “design” (26)

  1. Mark Boulton — Designing grid systems | Web Directions

    Slides here: http://www.webdirections.org/resources/mark-boulton-designing-grid-systems/#slides

    Grid sys tems have been used in print design, archi tec ture and inte rior design for gen­er a tions. Now, on the web, the same rules of grid sys tem com po si tion and usage no longer apply. Content is viewed in many ways; from RSS feeds to email. Content is viewed on many devices; from mobile phones to lap tops. Users can manip u late the browser, they can remove con tent, resize the can vas, resize the type faces. A designer is no longer in con trol of this pre sen ta tion. So where do grid sys tems fit in to all that?

    About Mark Boulton Mark Boulton is a graphic designer from the UK. He’s worked in Sydney, London and Manchester as an Art Director for clients such as the BBC, T-Mobile, British Airways, and Toyota. Mark now runs his own design studio, Mark Boulton Design. A stickler for applied typographic and design theory, Mark is an active member of the International Society of Typographic Designers and writes a design journal at markboulton.co.uk.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/mark-boulton-designing-grid-systems/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  2. Simple Steps to Great Web Design with Matthew Smith

    Creating beautiful web design is largely a matter of mastering a handful of simple techniques. The best designs employ systems of color, contrast, typography, and white space to achieve hierarchy, balance, and rhythm. The rest is just ingenuity and creativity. Matthew will review dozens of great and nearly great sites, explaining…

    Slides here: http://www.slideshare.net/squaredeye/simple-steps-to-great-web-design

    From http://audio.sxsw.com/2010/podcasts/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  3. The Art and Science of Seductive Interactions — Stephen Anderson

    Remember that “percentage complete” feature that LinkedIn implemented a few years ago, and how quickly this accelerated people filling out their profiles? It wasn’t a clever interface, IA, or technical prowess that made this a successful feature—it was basic human psychology. To be good UX professionals we need to crack open some psych 101 textbooks, learn what motivates people, and then bake these ideas into our designs.

    Independent consultant Stephen P. Anderson looks at specific examples of sites who’ve designed serendipity, arousal, rewards and other seductive elements into their application, especially during the post sign-up process when it is so easy to lose people. Regardless of your current project, the principles behind these examples (from disciplines like social sciences, psychology, neuroscience and cognitive science) can be applied universally. Best of all, attendees will receive a special gift that makes it easy to bridge theory with tomorrow’s deadline.

    Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/stephenpa/the-art-science-of-seductive-interactions

    http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/idea-2009-day-2

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  4. Adrian Shaughnessy / The Essential Attributes of the Graphic Designer

    Whether you’re new in the game or have been running your design studio for years – in today’s unsteady climate, what does it take to be a successful graphic designer?

    Adrian Shaughnessy, the self taught graphic designer and author of How to be a Graphic Designer, Without Losing Your Soul, reviewed essential attributes needed by the modern graphic designer dealing with the competing demands of creativity versus client accountability. Addressing questions such as:

    How can designers balance business discipline and creative freedom?

    What qualities are needed to produce good work and make a living?

    From http://www.design-event.co.uk/AdrianDL.htm

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  5. Grant Robinson – Visualising the user experience | Web Directions

    Designing for dynamic web applications and mobile devices poses a new set of challenges. Web designers are increasingly being asked to apply their skills to where the page model no longer applies. We need new ways of exploring the user experience and communicating behaviours involving sub-page changes and movement.

    Enter rapid prototyping. Widely acclaimed as one of the best ways to create great user experiences, it isn’t without its own pitfalls. This session will discuss the pros and cons of different prototyping techniques, and introduce a new technique called “screenflows” that focuses on visualising the user experience. Discover how to combine the best of paper prototyping, wireframes and HTML prototyping into one simple and effective prototyping technique. Learn how using this method can dramatically decrease the need for documentation, while increasing the speed and agility of the development process.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/grant-robinson-visualising-the-user-experience/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  6. Luke Stevens – Data driven design | Web Directions

    Far from being the enemy, data can be a designer’s best friend. So much so that it just might be the backbone of the next evolution of web design. Data doesn’t mean less creativity and experimentation, it means more. We’ve learned how to design sites that look good, and we know how to mark up our pages with web standards. Now it’s time to figure out what performs best.

    In this session you’ll learn not just the fundamental concepts of this ‘new web design’, but how you can get started with data-driven design using free tools that are available right now. If you’ve reached a point where you know how to design and build attractive, standards-based web sites and are wondering what comes next, this is the session for you.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/luke-stevens-data-driven-design/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  7. Suze Ingram – Would you like service design with that? | Web Directions

    Service design is a new discipline which focuses on understanding what customers want, then designing services which meet their needs. Sound familiar? Web designers have focused on user-centred design for years to create websites and applications that are user friendly.

    Service design is well established in Europe and North America and there’s already a handful of Australian businesses offering service design. What is it? Does experience in designing for screen interaction translate to designing services too? Will service design be the next big thing? Suze offers insight by drawing on her years of experience as a UX designer and researcher. She shows how service design might fit into your business in the future, who you might pitch it to, and what sort of skills you might need to deliver service design.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/suze-ingram-would-you-like-service-design-with-that/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  8. Christian Crumlish – Designing social interfaces | Web Directions

    Designing for social interaction is hard. People are unpredictable, consistency is a mixed blessing, and co-creation with your users requires a dizzying flirtation with loss of control. Christian will present the dos and don’ts of social web design using a sampling of interaction patterns, design principles and best practices to help you improve the design of your digital social environments.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/christian-crumlish-designing-social-interfaces/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

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