Tagged with “games” (42)

  1. While My Guitar Gently Bleeps

    A plumber eating a mushroom, and a spiny mammal jumping on a golden ring - you’d be forgiven for thinking these actions would make pretty indistinct or ambiguous sounds. But comedian, writer and musician Isy Suttie discovers why - thanks to Super Mario and Sonic the Hedgehog - they’re some of the most evocative sounds of the 1980s and 90s. Along with these sounds, the plinky plonky music of early video games buried itself inside a generation of ears growing up among Commodores, Ataris, Segas and Nintendos. Loosely referred to as "chiptune", many musicians and producers now use the jagged, electronic textures in their songs, going to great lengths to deliberately limit their audio palette for the sake of authenticity; some even rip apart old computers and consoles to build instruments faithful to the original sounds. Its ubiquity in film and TV scores is another testament to its efficiency in evoking that era.

    Isy traces the evolution of chiptune from early electronic music, looking at how composers like Hirokazu Tanaka and Koji Kondo created the catchy and unmistakeable themes of Tetris and Super Mario Brothers. She meets current chiptune artists, including the band whose instruments are joysticks and game controllers, and uses their advice to write her own digital classic. But can she convince the organisers of a die-hard gaming event to use it as their theme tune, and survive silicon scrutiny? Produced by Benn Cordrey.

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  2. Giant Bomb Presents - Giant Bomb Presents: A Chat With Jonathan Blow - Giant Bomb

    Austin Walker and CNET’s Jeff Bakalar sit down with Braid designer Jonathan Blow to talk about The Witness (his new game), the history of adventure games, and what it might mean to make "honest" art.


    —Huffduffed by hugo

  3. UX Week 2013| Ian Bogost | Fun

    Lately, there’s a lot of interest in borrowing design techniques from game design. At worst, such approaches mistake games for Skinner Boxes, incentive dispensers that dole out rewards for attention. But even at their best, designers’ adoption of game principles run up against the fact that games are fundamentally opposed to product and service design principles. Games are inefficient; they serve no purpose but to provide the experience that is their very playing. Yet, perhaps the most misunderstood concept in game-inspired design is also misunderstood within game design itself: the concept of fun as an end goal and aesthetic. This talk offers a surprising new theory of fun that can help anyone make, use, and appreciate things with greater satisfaction.

    Original video: https://vimeo.com/74943170
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  4. A Conversation With Shawn Elliott On Resident Evil | Inventory Management

    Former games journalist Shawn Elliott, now a designer at Arkane Studios, joins me to discuss the finer points of Resident Evil game design, thanks to the recent release of Resident Evil: Revelations 2. If you’d like to see more of these, let us know!


    —Huffduffed by hugo

  5. Reality is Plenty

    Lately, Augmented Reality (AR) has come to stand for the highest and deepest form of synthesis between the digital and physical worlds. Slavin will outline an argument for rethinking what really augments reality and what the benefits are, as well as the costs.

    Rather than considering AR as a technology, we will consider the goals we have for it, and how those are best addressed. Along the way, we’ll look at the history and future of seeing, with a series of stories, most of which are mostly true.

    AR may be where all this goes. But how it gets there, and where there is, is up for debate. This is intended to serve to start or end that debate, or at a minimum, to bring the conference to a close by pointing at the future, perhaps in the wrong direction.


    Kevin Slavin is the Managing Director and co-Founder of area/code. He has worked in corporate communications for technology-based clients for 13 years, including IBM, Compaq, Dell, TiVo, Time/Warner Cable, Microsoft, Wild Tangent and Qwest Wireless.

    Slavin has lectured at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, the American Institute of Graphic Arts, and the Parsons School of Design, and has written for various publications on games and game culture. His work has received honors from the AIGA, the One Show, and the Art Directors Club, and he has exhibited internationally, including the Frankfurt Museum für Moderne Kunst.

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw

  6. Sigourney Weaver on Alien: Isolation, horror and computer games – Tech Weekly podcast

    This week Guardian games editor Keith Stuart takes over the pod to explore the recent release of a new generation of horror genre computer games.

    Keith is joined by Leigh Alexander, a writer on gaming and games culture, to discuss the evolution of horror games over the last two decades and more and why indie games makers are returning to the genre.

    Also we meet Dan Pinchbeck from the indie games studio The Chinese Room creators of the award winning Dear Esther and the soon-to-be-released Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture. Dan discusses the creative opportunities that the horror genre offers and why there is so much innovation in this area.

    Finally Keith meets actor and producer Sigourney Weaver ahead of the latest Alien game Alien: Isolation.

    Sigourney discusses her role in voicing the character of Ripley for this incarnation of Alien and why she thinks computer games are the ideal place for Alien characters to develop.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  7. Memes for Cities

    A giant water slide. A talking lamppost. A zombie chase game. These recent city interventions were enabled by networks of people, technology and infrastructure, making the world more playful and creating change. In this Playable City talk, Clare will take on the functional image of a future city, sharing how to design playful experiences that change our relationships with the places we live and work.


    Clare Reddington lives in Bristol, the second nicest town in the UK (after Brighton, of course). She’s the director of iShed, a subsidiary of Watershed.

    Clare “Two Sheds” Reddington works on fun, collaborative research projects that usually involve some creative use of technology. The Playable City is a perfect example.

    Clare is a member of the advisory boards of Theatre Bristol and Hide&Seek. She was a finalist in the British Council’s UK Young Interactive Entrepreneur 2009 and has featured in Wired magazine’s 100 people who shape the Wired world in for the last three years (but I’d take that with a pinch of salt if I were you—they put Andy Budd and Richard Rutter on that list too).

    —Huffduffed by harriyott

  8. Games, Dammit! - Podcast

    Games, Dammit! - Podcast" lang="en-us


    —Huffduffed by hugo

  9. Tom Armitage on CBC Radio

    "This afternoon, I interviewed Tom Armitage. He’s a software designer who recently came to our attention because of a talk he gave recently, called "If Gamers Ran the World." In it, he puts forth the idea that in another 10 years, leaders who are the same age as Barack Obama or British Conservative Party leader David Cameron are now, will be children of the 1970s, and as such, more than likely the first leaders who grew up with video games as a core part of their way of interact with the world around them. What would that mean for how they would behave as leaders? A shorter version of this interview airs on the Jan 7th and 10th episode of Spark" — http://www.cbc.ca/spark/blog/2009/01/full_interview_tom_armitage.html

    —Huffduffed by boxman

  10. Pixels, People, and Play

    Seb is known for large scale installations and events that bring people together using technology, like his interactive digital fireworks, glowstick voting, and PixelPhones - a system that connects all the smart phones together, turning each member of the audience into a single pixel of a huge pulsating display.

    Hardware and software is evolving so fast that creative coders can barely keep up, and we’ve just scratched the surface of what depth sensors, projectors and smart phones are capable of.

    In this down to earth session, Seb will explore how technology can create huge interactive playful events and encourage a sense of community rather than everyone having a private experience with their own screens.


    There’s a good chance that you’ve seen Seb before: he travels the world spreading his infectious enthusiasm for coding and teaching others how to join in the fun. He’s one of those technology-agnostic creators. He used to do a lot of work in Flash. These days he’s more likely to be using JavaScript or Processing or Corona or whatever cutting-edge technology has currently got him all excited.

    Lest you think that Seb dabbles only in the realm of pixels, he has been known to use the physical world as his canvas too, making digital fireworks and projections with Processing.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

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