Tagged with “fiction” (168)

  1. Planet Money, Episode 625: The Last Job

    There are some very smart people out there arguing that machines and computers are stealing our jobs. And that when these jobs go away, they won’t be replaced. They think that in the future, there will be fewer and fewer jobs.

    In the short-term, that’s a big problem, but in the long-term, it could be great news. If robots are doing all the work, people can just relax, right?

    What happens when the jobs go away? No one knows. So, in collaboration with The Truth, we made something up. Our show today is a work of fiction.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2015/05/20/408292388/episode-625-the-last-job

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Homer, Hagrid and the Incredible Hulk

    Ben Hammersley investigates fictional universes, from Harry Potter to Game of Thrones.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03bvm5w

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  3. Selected Shorts: John Updike Redux - A Celebration

    The American master John Updike uncovered the extraordinary in the ordinary in stories written over 50 years. In “Unstuck” a minor mishap strengthens a young couple’s marriage. Guest host Jane Kaczmarek is the reader. Two-time Oscar winner Sally Field reads Updike’s “Playing with Dynamite,” in which an aging man looks back on his life and loves.

    https://soundcloud.com/selectedshorts/john-updike-redux-a-celebration

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. Adam Johnson at the Commonwealth Club

    Adam Johnson, Associate Professor, Stanford University; Author, The Orphan Master’s Son and Fortune Smiles Kathryn Ma, Author, The Year She Left Us and All That Work and Still No Boys; Jury Member, The Commonwealth Club’s California Book Awards — Moderator

    This program is part of the Good Lit series underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation

    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for his acclaimed and bestselling novel The Orphan Master’s Son, Johnson is one of America’s most provocative and powerful authors. In his latest novel, Fortune Smiles, he continues to give voice to characters rarely heard from while offering something we all seek from fiction: a new way of looking at our world. In six masterly stories, Johnson delves deep into love and loss, natural disasters, the influence of technology, and how the political shapes the personal. Unnerving, riveting and written with a timeless quality, these stories confirm Johnson as one of America’s greatest writers and serves as an indispensable guide to our new century.

    http://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/2015-10-19/adam-johnson-pulitzer-prize-winning-author

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  5. dConstruct 2015: Nick Foster

    Jeremy and Nick discuss the details of design fiction, and talk about the need for a mundane futurism, which leads them to compare notes on the differences between Derby and Silicon Valley.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Nick Foster ​is and industrial designer, futurist​, film-maker and writer. He graduated from the Royal College of ​A​r​t​ in 2001 ​and worked for companies including Sony, Seymourpowell and Nokia. In​ 2012 ​he moved to California ​to take a role as ​creative lead for Nokia’s Advanced Design ​studio​. ​He currently ​w​orks​ with a brilliant team in Mountain View​ to help define the next generation of Google products.​ Nick is also a partner at the Near Future Laboratory, developing projects in the field of ​design fiction, speculative and critical futures.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/nick-foster

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  6. A Brief History of Tomorrow

    What did you imagine the early 21st century would look like when you were a kid? Was it all flying cars and jetpacks? Daily trips to the moon and hoverboards back here on Earth? Or were you more enamoured with the darker sides of futurism? Perhaps Doomsday prophecies and the ravages of Future Shock were on your mind. Did you sit up nights worrying about acid rain and environmental degradation?

    How we imagine the future says a lot about us both as individuals and as groups. And by studying past visions of the future we can not only gain new insights into history, but we might even learn something about where we’re heading today.

    Matt Novak’s talk, “A Brief History of Tomorrow”, looks at the history of invention and imagination — from robot vacuum cleaners of the 1950s to visions of the internet before the internet even existed. He’ll trace the history of popular ideas about how we’d be living here in the year 2015, and debunk a few common historical myths along the way. No matter how talented our prognosticators, we often discover that the future is never exactly as anyone predicted. Which is precisely what makes studying it so much fun.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/matt-novak

    Matt Novak is the editor of Gizmodo’s Paleofuture blog, which looks at past visions of the future. He explores the history of our most optimistic dreams and our most pessimistic fears by looking at everything from flying cars and utopian communities to overpopulation and complete societal collapse. His work is inspired by his private collection of retro-futuristic artifacts, including hundreds of vintage tech magazines, space age lunchboxes, 1980s videophones, among hundreds of other pieces. Matt started the Paleofuture blog independently in 2007 and it was later acquired by Smithsonian magazine in 2011 and then by Gawker Media in 2013. He currently lives in Los Angeles, a city which has about four years until it’s set to achieve the utopia depicted in the 1982 documentary Blade Runner.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  7. Kim Stanley Robinson and Sheldon Solomon on exploration and death – books podcast | Books | The Guardian

    Can humanity escape extinction by reaching for the stars? We confront final questions with the science fiction novelist Kim Stanley Robinson and the psychologist Sheldon Solomon.

    We’re heading off into the unknown in this week’s podcast, with a pair of writers who explore what drives our human experiment.

    The writer Kim Stanley Robinson has been examining possible futures for humanity for 40 years in a series of novels that stretch from nuclear devastation through climate chaos to Mars and beyond. His latest novel, Aurora, pushes 500 years onwards with a story of a vast starship on a 200-year journey to Tau Ceti.

    Robinson explains why he decided to write a generation starship novel and why he’s happier pushing at the boundaries of fiction rather than the boundaries of science.

    The psychologist Sheldon Solomon has, by contrast, been expanding the realm of science, putting an insight from ancient philosophy – that our lives are shaped by our awareness of our own mortality – on a sound experimental footing.

    Solomon explains how he and his colleagues Jeff Greenberg and Tom Pyszczynski have been measuring the ways in which the fear of death alters our behaviour and how the stories we tell ourselves against that fear have forged history.

    http://www.theguardian.com/books/audio/2015/aug/07/kim-stanley-robinson-sheldon-solomon-exploration-death-podcast

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. Limetown Episode 1 - What We Know

    Ten years ago, over three hundred men, women and children disappeared from a small town in Tennessee, never to be heard from again.

    In this first episode of a seven-part podcast, American Public Radio host Lia Haddock asks the question once more, "What happened to the people of Limetown?"

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  9. dConstruct 2015: Matt Novak

    Jeremy chats to Matt Novak about past visions of the future, the Jetsons, the Apollo programme, and how great dConstruct 2015 is going to be.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Matt Novak is the editor of Gizmodo’s Paleofuture blog, which looks at past visions of the future. He explores the history of our most optimistic dreams and our most pessimistic fears by looking at everything from flying cars and utopian communities to overpopulation and complete societal collapse. His work is inspired by his private collection of retro-futuristic artifacts, including hundreds of vintage tech magazines, space age lunchboxes, 1980s videophones, among hundreds of other pieces. Matt started the Paleofuture blog independently in 2007 and it was later acquired by Smithsonian magazine in 2011 and then by Gawker Media in 2013. He currently lives in Los Angeles, a city which has about four years until it’s set to achieve the utopia depicted in the 1982 documentary Blade Runner.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/matt-novak

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw

  10. dConstruct 2015: Ingrid Burrington

    Jeremy and Ingrid geek out together on the physical infrastructure of the internet, time travel narratives, and William Gibson’s The Peripheral (contains a spoiler warning, but no actual spoilers).

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/

    Ingrid Burrington writes, makes maps, and tells jokes on a small island off the coast of America. She’s a member of Deep Lab, the author of Networks of New York: An Internet Infrastructure Field Guide, and currently an artist in residence at the Data and Society Research Institute.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/ingrid-burrington

    —Huffduffed by iamdanw

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