Suze Ingram – Would you like service design with that? | Web Directions

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  1. The value of consciously designed services « Service Design 2012

    We can get caught up in researching, designing and launching services, and totally forget the impact the conscious design of services is having on real people. Let this cease!

    Using stories from Australia and around the world, this talk provides tangible examples of the impact service design is having on customers, staff and organisations in a range of different sectors.

    Presented by Iain Barker

    http://www.uxaustralia.com.au/servicedesign-2012/the-value-of-consciously-designed-services

    —Huffduffed by theJBJshow

  2. How to transform vision into value « Service Design 2012

    This presentation shines the light on what’s missing in turning a customer experience vision into tangible business value. How do you use all that is good and useful from typical customer experience approaches? How do you add commercial rigour and the hard core analytics in a way that one competency doesn’t dominate the other? What is the secret in bringing together the skills and perspectives that result in a great customer experience and an equally great commercial outcome?

    Presented by Damian Kernahan

    http://www.uxaustralia.com.au/servicedesign-2012/value-networks

    —Huffduffed by theJBJshow

  3. Damien McCormack – Accessibility means business

    Over 4 million people in Australia have a disability. As a result they may use the web in a different way to you: a keyboard instead of a mouse; a screen reader instead of a screen. Accessibility is the way that you can tap into this large and growing audience.

    In this session, Damien will look at why accessibility matters - not just because it is the right thing to do, or a legal requirement. He will discuss how accessibility leads to more robust, maintainable, searchable and usable websites that meet everyone’s needs. Damien will also explore the opportunities accessibility offers for mobile web design, and provide some practical advice about how to include accessibility in your next project.

    —Huffduffed by bigskinnyboy

  4. Christian Crumlish – Designing social interfaces | Web Directions

    Designing for social interaction is hard. People are unpredictable, consistency is a mixed blessing, and co-creation with your users requires a dizzying flirtation with loss of control. Christian will present the dos and don’ts of social web design using a sampling of interaction patterns, design principles and best practices to help you improve the design of your digital social environments.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/christian-crumlish-designing-social-interfaces/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  5. Luke Stevens – Data driven design | Web Directions

    Far from being the enemy, data can be a designer’s best friend. So much so that it just might be the backbone of the next evolution of web design. Data doesn’t mean less creativity and experimentation, it means more. We’ve learned how to design sites that look good, and we know how to mark up our pages with web standards. Now it’s time to figure out what performs best.

    In this session you’ll learn not just the fundamental concepts of this ‘new web design’, but how you can get started with data-driven design using free tools that are available right now. If you’ve reached a point where you know how to design and build attractive, standards-based web sites and are wondering what comes next, this is the session for you.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/luke-stevens-data-driven-design/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  6. Kelly Goto – WorkFLOW | Web Directions

    Shift your thinking, alter your process, and create a dynamic of doing rather than spinning. Workflow veteran Kelly Goto leads you through a fast-paced session designed to help transcend obstacles and develop a culture of adaptation, progress and flow. Learn the fundamental principles behind The FLOW Method, an actionable series of steps utilizing new processes and techniques to re-invigorate your organization and team. Whether you are an independent, small business owner or the manager of an in-house web marketing team, you will gain valuable insights and tools to bring back to your organization.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/kelly-goto-workflow/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  7. Matt Webb – Opening keynote: Escalante | Web Directions

    The long run to the turn of the millennium got us preoccupied with conclusions. The Internet is finally taken for granted. The iPhone is finally ubiquitous computing come true. Let’s think not of ends, but dawns: it’s not that we’re on the home straight of ubicomp, but the beginning of a century of smart matter. It’s not about fixing the Web, but making a springboard for new economies, new ways of creating, and new cultures.

    The 21st century is a participatory culture, not a consumerist one. What does it mean when small teams can be responsible for world-size effects, on the same playing field as major corporations and government? We can look at the Web - breaking down publishing and consuming from day zero - for where we might be heading in a world bigger than we can really see, and we can look at design - playful and rational all at once - to help us figure out what to do when we get there.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/matt-webb-opening-keynote-escalante/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  8. How to teach yourself service design: Three years of lessons learnt « Service Design 2012

    A couple of years ago we decided that our vision at Optimal Usability was to help transform New Zealand organisations into providers of world-class customer experiences. We quickly came to the conclusion that world-class experience is almost always across channels, and while we had done lots of projects with different channels, very few were about researching and designing the end-to-end experience.

    This was about the same time that service design was gaining some currency as an umbrella term for cross-channel customer experience.

    We figured that we really needed to bone up on what service design was, and how it applied to what we did. The resulting journey took us 3 years and we discovered a lot about how to “learn service design”. Some innovative approaches included spending 3 months doing service design on ourselves, interviewing CEOs of service design companies and conducting internal knowledge sharing sessions.

    In this presentation I’ll share our journey, our lessons and our mistakes; and give you some ideas that you can try.

    Presented by Trent Mankelow

    http://www.uxaustralia.com.au/servicedesign-2012/how-to-teach-yourself-service-design

    —Huffduffed by theJBJshow

  9. Grant Robinson – Visualising the user experience | Web Directions

    Designing for dynamic web applications and mobile devices poses a new set of challenges. Web designers are increasingly being asked to apply their skills to where the page model no longer applies. We need new ways of exploring the user experience and communicating behaviours involving sub-page changes and movement.

    Enter rapid prototyping. Widely acclaimed as one of the best ways to create great user experiences, it isn’t without its own pitfalls. This session will discuss the pros and cons of different prototyping techniques, and introduce a new technique called “screenflows” that focuses on visualising the user experience. Discover how to combine the best of paper prototyping, wireframes and HTML prototyping into one simple and effective prototyping technique. Learn how using this method can dramatically decrease the need for documentation, while increasing the speed and agility of the development process.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/grant-robinson-visualising-the-user-experience/

    —Huffduffed by plindberg

  10. Elliot Jay Stocks – Progressive enhancement

    In the summer of ‘07 in a flood-soaked Oxford, England, Elliot appeared on stage for the very first time. His presentation, ‘Progressive Enhancement & Intentional Degradation’, looked at how to reward modern browsers with the latest CSS tricks and punish IE by dropping certain site features. Over two years later, what has changed? We’re starting to see the ideology of progressive enhancement — especially with CSS3 — spread throughout the web design community, but more work needs to be done.

    What can we do to spread the message further and design a better-looking web faster? Elliot will look at how features of the CSS2.1 and CSS3 specs can enhance your websites and he’ll examine the implication of using such techniques. He’ll look at the issues surrounding font embedding and the recent development of the font-as-service; the arguments about browser support; the potentially controversial irrelevance of validation; and how we can attempt to reach the future sooner by writing forward-thinking code. In this motivational presentation Elliot will urge you to embrace the techniques of modern web design and to stop worrying about the so-called restraints.

    —Huffduffed by bigskinnyboy