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Tagged with “to” (23)

  1. Margaret Atwood on Science Fiction, Dystopias, and Intestinal Parasites | Underwire | Wired.com

    In the latest episode of Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy Margaret Atwood explains how to invent your own religion, reveals which dystopian future she fears most, and discusses her new novel MaddAddam.

    http://www.wired.com/underwire/2013/09/geeks-guide-margaret-atwood/

    —Huffduffed by pip

  2. “Siri, did I leave the oven on?” Experience Design for the Connected Home

    For a long time, smart homes were only for geeks or the rich. But mass market retailers are now starting to bring out affordable connected domestic hardware and services to help consumers understand their energy use, control heating/cooling and appliances, and make their homes safer and more secure. It will soon be normal to turn lights and appliances on and off from your smartphone, and set your burglar alarm over the web.

    But the home is a challenging environment: it’s often a shared space inhabited by people with different needs and goals, and the rigid structures of technology driven systems don’t fit the way most of us run our home lives.

    In this talk, I’ll introduce what connected home technologies can do, why the UX is often unsympathetic to our home lives and how we might improve it, and general learnings on designing interconnected, embedded systems that can be applied to other types of multi-device service too.

    http://library.iasummit.org/podcasts/siri-did-i-leave-the-oven-on-experience-design-for-the-connected-home/

    —Huffduffed by pip

  3. 99% Invisible - 87 - I Heart NY (tm)

    By now, the story is well known. A man sits in the backseat of a cab, sketching on a notepad as night falls over a crumbling city. He scribbles the letter I. He draws a heart. And then an N, and then a Y. Right away he knows he’s got something. This is it, he thinks. This is the campaign.

    The man was a designer named Milton Glaser. The City was New York. The year was 1977.

    The city needed a miracle. And it kind of got one in three letters and a symbol: I ♥ NY

    The I ♥ NY campaign was so successful that it became part of the built environment. So people started doing with I ♥ NY the same thing that humans have always done when encountering something in nature: they started imitating it.

    http://99percentinvisible.prx.org/2013/08/21/87-i-heart-ny-tm/?utm_source=feedly

    —Huffduffed by pip

  4. Selected Shorts: Dreams and Schemes (with Stephen Colbert and Leonard Nimoy)

    Dreams and Schemes

    Guest host Guest host Neil Gaiman introduces two American classics. In Ray Bradbury’s futuristic “The Veldt,” a virtual reality nursery turns on its owners. The reader is Stephen Colbert. In James Thurber’s “The Catbird Seat,” a mild-mannered employee plots revenge. Leonard Nimoy performs.

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  5. Brighton SF with Brian Aldiss, Lauren Beukes, and Jeff Noon

    On the eve of dConstruct 2012, Jeremy Keith hosts an evening of readings and chat with three of the brightest stars of the science-fiction world at the Pavilion Theatre in Brighton.

    • Lauren Beukes, author of Moxyland, Zoo City, and The Shining Girls.
    • Jeff Noon, author of Vurt, Automated Alice, and Channel SK1N.
    • Brian Aldiss OBE, author of Hothouse, Nonstop, and the Helliconia trilogy.

    Event details: http://brightonsf.adactio.com/

    Transcript: http://adactio.com/articles/5740/

    —Huffduffed by pip

  6. Teaching Touch: Tapworthy Touchscreen Design

    Discover the rules of thumb for finger-friendly design. Touch gestures are sweeping away buttons, menus and windows from mobile devices—and even from the next version of Windows. Find out why those familiar desktop widgets are weak replacements for manipulating content directly, and learn to craft touchscreen interfaces that effortlessly teach users new gesture vocabularies.

    The challenge: gestures are invisible, without the visual cues offered by buttons and menus. As your touchscreen app sheds buttons, how do people figure out how to use the damn thing? Learn to lead your audience by the hand (and fingers) with practical techniques that make invisible gestures obvious. Designer Josh Clark (author of O’Reilly books "Tapworthy" and "Best iPhone Apps") mines a variety of surprising sources for interface inspiration and design patterns. Along the way, discover the subtle power of animation, why you should be playing lots more video games, and why a toddler is your best beta tester.

    Josh Clark, Principal, Global Moxie

    I’m a designer specializing in mobile design strategy and user experience. I’m author of the O’Reilly books "Tapworthy: Designing Great iPhone Apps" and "Best iPhone Apps." My outfit Global Moxie offers consulting services and training to help media companies, design agencies, and creative organizations build tapworthy mobile apps and effective websites.

    Before the interwebs swallowed me up, I worked on a slew of national PBS programs at Boston’s WGBH. I shared my three words of Russian with Mikhail Gorbachev, strolled the ranch with Nancy Reagan, hobnobbed with Rockefellers, and wrote trivia questions for a primetime game show. In 1996, I created the uberpopular "Couch-to-5K" (C25K) running program, which has helped millions of skeptical would-be exercisers take up jogging. (My motto for fitness is the same for user experience: no pain, no pain.)

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/2012/events/event_IAP10988

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