Tagged with “change” (14)

  1. Professor Matt Ridley; Global Warming vs Global Greening

    Professor Matt Ridley explains some basics about just why we should not be in fear of "man-made" climate change. Speech was at the Royal Society, UK on the 17th October, 2016.

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCcLggcPcj0
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 28 Oct 2016 20:20:35 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Neil deGrasse Tyson & Bill Nye talk “The Future of Humanity” with Elon Musk

    Neil deGrasse Tyson explores the future of humanity with one of the men forging that future: billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla Motors. Co-hosted by Chuck Nice and guest starring Bill Nye.

    https://soundcloud.com/startalk/the-future-of-humanity-with-elon-musk

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Smashing Physics: how we discovered the Higgs boson - podcast | Science | theguardian.com

    This week Guardian science editor Ian Sample meets particle physicist Professor Jonathan Butterworth from University College London to talk about his new book Smashing Physics. It’s an insider’s account of one of the most momentous scientific breakthroughs of our times: the discovery of the Higgs boson announced in July 2012.

    Jon discusses what it’s like to work on the largest science experiment in history and why such ambitious – and costly – endeavours benefit us all.

    Next up, British Association media fellow Nishad Karim reports from the UCL Symposium on the Origins of Life. Be it life on Earth or life elsewhere in the universe, this symposium covered it all with a range of experts from cosmology and biology to meteorology, discussing some very big questions. Where did we come from? Did life begin on Earth or elsewhere? Are we alone?

    Nishad spoke to several of the presenters including Dr Zita Matins, an astrobiologist from Imperial College London, and Dr Dominic Papineau, a geochemist from UCL. Dr Martins is a specialist in finding organic material essential for life in meteorites, and Dr Papineau looks for old organic life a little closer to home, analysing Earth rocks.

    Other speakers included Dr Francisco Diego, a UCL cosmologist, who discussed the life of the universe itself from beginning to now, 13.8bn years later.

    And finally, Ian asks Guardian environment writer Karl Mathiesen whether 2014 will be the hottest year on record.

    http://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2014/jul/28/smashing-physics-higgs-boson-jon-butterworth-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. David Deutsch: Chemical scum that dream of distant quasars

    Legendary scientist David Deutsch puts theoretical physics on the back burner to discuss a more urgent matter: the survival of our species. The first step toward solving global warming, he says, is to admit that we have a problem.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/david_deutsch_on_our_place_in_the_cosmos.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Ockham’s Razor - 17 April 2011 - The Titanic disaster and global warming

    Arthur Marcel lectures at the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane and in today’s talk he compares the circumstances surrounding the sinking of the Titanic to issues surrounding global warming.

    http://www.abc.net.au/rn/ockhamsrazor/stories/2011/3191637.htm

    —Huffduffed by briansuda

  6. Dyson on Heresy, Climate Change, and Science

    Freeman Dyson of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about science, his career, and the future. Dyson argues for the importance of what he calls heresy—challenging the scientific dogmas of the day. Dyson argues that our knowledge of climate science is incomplete and that too many scientists treat it as if it were totally understood. He reflects on his childhood and earlier work, particularly in the area of space travel. And he says that biology is the science today with the most exciting developments.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Science Weekly: End of the World News

    We talk to the BBC’s David Shukman about reporting climate change and the BP oil spill. Plus, the results of the Guardian’s hack day, a study on mobile phone masts and cancer, and the pitfalls of patenting genes.

    A gaggle of geeks recently invaded the Guardian’s London headquarters for a hack day. Their leader, Jeremy Keith, reveals the results of two days of brainstorming.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/audio/2010/jun/28/science-weekly-podcast-david-shukman

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Michael Mann - Unprecedented Attacks on Climate Research

    For the scientists who study global warming, now is the winter of their despair.

    In the news, it has been climate scandal after alleged climate scandal. First came “ClimateGate,” then “GlacierGate,” “Amazon Gate,” and so on. In public opinion polls, meanwhile, Americans’ acceptance of the science of global warming appears to be declining. Even a freak snowstorm now seems to sow added doubt about this rigorous body of research.

    In response to growing public skepticism—and a wave of dramatic attacks on individual researchers—the scientific community is now bucking up to more strongly defend its knowledge. Leading the charge is one of the most frequently attacked researchers of them all—Pennsylvania State University climatologist Michael Mann.

    In this interview with host Chris Mooney, Mann pulls no punches. He defends the fundamental scientific consensus on climate change, and explains why those who attack it consistently miss the target. He also answers critics of his “hockey stick” study, and explains why the charges that have arisen in “ClimateGate” seem much more smoke than fire.

    Dr. Michael E. Mann is a member of the Pennsylvania State University faculty, and director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center. His research focuses on the application of statistical techniques to understanding climate variability and change, and he was a Lead Author on the “Observed Climate Variability and Change” chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Scientific Assessment Report. Among many other distinguished scientific activities, editorships, and awards, Mann is author of more than 120 peer-reviewed and edited publications. That includes, most famously, the 1998 study that introduced the so called “hockey stick,” a graph showing that modern temperatures appear to be much higher than anything seen in at least the last thousand years. With his colleague Lee Kump, Mann also recently authored the book Dire Predictions: Understanding Global Warming. Finally, he is one of the founders and contributors to the prominent global warming blog, RealClimate.org.

    http://www.pointofinquiry.org/michael_mann_unprecedented_attacks_on_climate_research/

    —Huffduffed by Indyplanets

  9. Dr. Seuss’s Copenhagen by Marcus Brigstocke

    The debacle of the Copenhagen summit told as a Dr. Seuss story on BBC’s The Now Show.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Cory Doctorow: Singularity or Dark Age?

    —Huffduffed by andybudd

Page 1 of 2Older