Beyond Usability: Mapping Emotion to Experience

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  1. What is Web 2.0?

    User experience designer and upcoming author, Andy Budd, discussed how the web is moving from a document delivery system to an application platform. Andy attempted to define what Web 2.0 really means and looked at some of the technologies and applications making this transition possible.

    http://2005.dconstruct.org/

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  2. Experience and the Emotion Commotion

    The competitive environment for technology is changing, and its impact on experience design is deep: capabilities, features, and functions are no longer enough. Emotional engagement will distinguish successful consumer experiences of the future. Designing in this world requires we change the way we think about people and products. This presentation provides a brief overview of a counter-intuitive emotional design approach and its application to one of the hallmarks of the next phase in interaction design: Natural User Interface.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/augustdelosreyes/

    August de los Reyes is the Principal Director of User Experience for Microsoft Surface, a team dedicated to pioneering natural and intuitive ways to interact with technology.

    August is a member of the Advanced Studies Program at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design where he received an MDesS with Distinction for his research in product design and emotion. A guest design faculty member at the University of Washington, he was a 2007-2008 visiting associate at the Oxford Internet Institute. He is working on his next book entitled The Poetics of Everyday Objects.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  3. Letting Go

    Design (or if you prefer—user experience) is at a crossroads. In our globalized, hyper-connected world, users no longer need to wait for us to create experiences for them. As we debate the value of design thinking, the usefulness of the next API, or strive to craft the ultimate cross-platform experience—users are sorting this out on their own, using whatever service or technology is “good enough” for them at the time.

    Strategies and scenarios that made sense mere months ago, are disintegrating as technologies shift, business models crumble, and we watch with dismay as users exchange tips to disable JavaScript on their Kindles, or access multiplayer Flash games on the iPads.

    What happens to your brand, your product, and your bottom line when users choose “good enough”, over your carefully crafted product or service? Is it a sign of failure, a missed opportunity, or a chance to dive head first towards a new reality?

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/bryan-stephanie-rieger

    Bryan Rieger is a designer, writer and reluctant developer with a background in theatre design and classical animation. Bryan has worked across various media including print, broadcast, web and mobile; and with clients such as Apple, Microsoft and Nokia.

    Stephanie Rieger is a writer, designer, and closet anthropologist with a passion for the many ways people interact with technology. With a diverse background, Stephanie’s expertise lies in marrying design, technology, and business goals to craft simple, elegant experiences.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. 4 - Jeremy chatting with Sarah, David, and Tom

    Jeremy Keith chats with Sarah Parmenter, David Bushell, and Tom Maslen at the Responsive Day Out in Brighton on March 1st.

    The Responsive Day Out is an affordable, enjoyable gathering of UK designers and developers sharing their workflow strategies, techniques, and experiences with responsive web design.

    http://responsiveconf.com/

    —Huffduffed by Woodruff

  5. Jeremy chatting with Richard, Josh, Laura, and Elliot

    Jeremy Keith chatting with Richard Rutter, Josh Emerson, Laura Kalbag, and Elliot Jay Stocks at the Responsive Day Out in Brighton on March 1st.

    The Responsive Day Out is an affordable, enjoyable gathering of UK designers and developers sharing their workflow strategies, techniques, and experiences with responsive web design.

    http://responsiveconf.com/

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  6. Designing the Complete User Experience — dConstruct Audio Archive

    Design is hard. The Web is complicated. How do we make things for people when all we have are the most basic understanding of what they want? Join Jeffrey Veen as he takes a broad survey of the challenges designers face today, and how we’re all solving those problems with new perspectives on user research, interaction design, and information architecture.

    http://archive.dconstruct.org/interaction+design/completeuserexperience

    —Huffduffed by StuartMiller

  7. Jeremy chatting with Anna, Andy, and Bruce

    Jeremy Keith chatting with Anna Debenham, Andy Hume, and Bruce Lawson at the Responsive Day Out in Brighton on March 1st.

    The Responsive Day Out is an affordable, enjoyable gathering of UK designers and developers sharing their workflow strategies, techniques, and experiences with responsive web design.

    http://responsiveconf.com/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Jeremy chatting with Owen, Paul, and Mark

    Jeremy Keith chatting with Owen Gregory, Paul Lloyd, and Mark Boulton at the Responsive Day Out in Brighton on March 1st.

    The Responsive Day Out is an affordable, enjoyable gathering of UK designers and developers sharing their workflow strategies, techniques, and experiences with responsive web design.

    http://responsiveconf.com/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Designing the Complete User Experience — dConstruct Audio Archive

    Design is hard. The Web is complicated. How do we make things for people when all we have are the most basic understanding of what they want? Join Jeffrey Veen as he takes a broad survey of the challenges designers face today, and how we’re all solving those problems with new perspectives on user research, interaction design, and information architecture.

    http://archive.dconstruct.org/2006/completeuserexperience

    —Huffduffed by matthewtarr

  10. Brighton SF with Brian Aldiss, Lauren Beukes, and Jeff Noon

    On the eve of dConstruct 2012, Jeremy Keith hosts an evening of readings and chat with three of the brightest stars of the science-fiction world at the Pavilion Theatre in Brighton.

    • Lauren Beukes, author of Moxyland, Zoo City, and The Shining Girls.
    • Jeff Noon, author of Vurt, Automated Alice, and Channel SK1N.
    • Brian Aldiss OBE, author of Hothouse, Nonstop, and the Helliconia trilogy.

    Event details: http://brightonsf.adactio.com/

    Transcript: http://adactio.com/articles/5740/

    —Huffduffed by adactio