paulo72 / Paul

Designer and Maker of digital things.

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Huffduffed (181)

  1. Fireside Chat: Brian Eno

    Electronic music didn’t start with Brian Eno, but it was certainly never the same after him. On Roxy Music’s first two albums he helped make synthesizers and tape effects part of a rock lineup, pricking the ears of future synth-pop creators such as Human League. As a solo artist he forged a new genre, which he dubbed ambient music, before effectively becoming a one-man genre himself, lending touches to Genesis (where he’s credited with “Enossification”), John Cale, and David Bowie during his golden Berlin period. There wasn’t much in the way of experimental 70s music that wasn’t made a little odder by Eno’s touch. But that touch could also be a multiplatinum one, as he showed as a producer for U2 in the mid-80s and Coldplay 20 years later. In the 90s he created perhaps the most widely heard music of all: the six-second start-up sound for Microsoft’s Windows 95 operating system. Typically mischievous, he later let it be known that he’d created it on a Mac.

    (The token-tagged MP3 link this uses will probably expire at some point. You can listen to it at http://www.rbmaradio.com/shows/brian-eno-fireside-chat instead.)

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  2. ♫ Episode #35 – Musician and Developer Peter Chilvers on Brian Eno’s Album and App Reflection

    Musician and developer Peter Chilvers discusses making apps with Brian Eno, including the new generative music composition Reflection.

    http://www.thenexttrack.com/%e2%99%ab-episode-35-musician-and-developer-peter-chilvers-on-brian-enos-album-and-app-relfection/

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  3. Brian Eno on Why Do We Make Art & What’s It Good For?: Download His 2015 John Peel Lecture | Open Culture

    Image by BBC Radio 6

    "Symphonies, perfume, sports cars, graffiti, needlepoint, monuments, tattoos, slang, Ming vases, doodles, poodles, apple strudels. Still life, Second Life, bed knobs and boob jobs" — why do we make any of these things? That question has driven much of the career (and indeed life) of Brian Eno, the man who invented ambient music and has brought his distinctive, at once intellectual and visceral sensibility to the work of bands like Roxy Music, U2, and Coldplay as well as the realm of visual art. Back in September, he laid out all the illuminating and entertaining answers at which he has thus far arrived in giving the BBC’s 2015 John Peel Lecture.

    http://open.live.bbc.co.uk/mediaselector/5/redir/version/2.0/mediaset/audio-nondrm-download/proto/http/vpid/p033smws.mp3

    We featured Eno’s wide-ranging talk on the nature of art and culture, as well as its utility to the human race, back when the Beeb offered it streaming for a limited time only. But now they’ve made it freely available to download and listen to as you please: you can download the MP3 at this link. You can also follow along, if you like, with the PDF transcript available here, which will certainly be of assistance when you go to look up all the people, ideas, works of art, and pieces of history Eno references along the way, including but not limited to the "STEM" subjects, Baked Alaska, black Chanel frocks, the Riemann hypothesis, Little Dorrit, Morse Peckham, Coronation Street, airplane simulators, the dole, Lord Reith, John Peel himself, Basic Income, Linux, and collective joy.

    If you haven’t had enough Eno after that — and here at Open Culture, we never get enough Eno — have a look at and a listen to clips of a conversation he recently had with science writer Steven Johnson, all of which have an intellectual overlap with the Peel Lecture. The first deals with music, something this self-professed "non-musician" has done much more than his share of thinking about. The second has to do with punchlines, or rather, Eno’s conception of a piece of art, not as a thing with value in and of itself, but as a kind of punchline on the order of "I used to have a car like that." (To hear its setup, you’ll have to watch the video.)

    In the third, Johnson and Eno discuss an idea at the core of the Peel Lecture, Eno’s famous definition of culture, and later art: "Everything you don’t have to do." That covers all the aforementioned symphonies, perfume, sports cars, graffiti, needlepoint, monuments, tattoos, slang, Ming vases, doodles, poodles, apple strudels, still life, Second Life, bed knobs and boob jobs: "All of those things are sort of unnecessary in the sense that we could all survive without doing any of them," Eno says, "but in fact we don’t. We all engage with them." And if you want to know why we should keep engaging with them, and in fact engage with them more vigorously than ever, Eno can tell you.

    Related Content:

    Hear 150 Tracks Highlighting Brian Eno’s Career as a Musician, Composer & Producer & Stream His 2015 John Peel Lecture

    Jump Start Your Creative Process with Brian Eno’s “Oblique Strategies”

    Revisit the Radio Sessions and Record Collection of Groundbreaking BBC DJ John Peel

    Brian Eno Lists 20 Books for Rebuilding Civilization & 59 Books For Building Your Intellectual World

    Listen to “Brian Eno Day,” a 12-Hour Radio Show Spent With Eno & His Music (Recorded in 1988)

    When Brian Eno & Other Artists Peed in Marcel Duchamp’s Famous Urinal

    Prof. Iggy Pop Delivers the BBC’s 2014 John Peel Lecture on “Free Music in a Capitalist Society”

    Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and broadcasts on cities and culture. He’s at work on a book about Los Angeles, A Los Angeles Primer, the video series The City in Cinema, the crowdfunded journalism project Where Is the City of the Future?, and the Los Angeles Review of Books’ Korea Blog. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall or on Facebook.

    http://www.openculture.com/2015/12/brian-enos-peel-lecture-on-art.html

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  4. Radical Technologies - with Adam Greenfield | Virtual Futures Salon

    Virtual Futures presents leading technology thinker Adam Greenfield on his field manual to the Radical Technologies that are transforming our lives.

    We’re told that innovations—from augmented-reality interfaces and virtual assistants to autonomous delivery drones and self-driving cars—will make life easier, more convenient and more productive. 3D printing promises unprecedented control over the form and distribution of matter, while the blockchain stands to revolutionize everything from the recording and exchange of value to the way we organize the mundane realities of the day to day. And, all the while, fiendishly complex algorithms are operating quietly in the background, reshaping the economy, transforming the fundamental terms of our politics and even redefining what it means to be human.

    Having successfully colonized everyday life, these radical technologies are now conditioning the choices available to us in the years to come. How do they work? What challenges do they present to us, as individuals and societies? Who benefits from their adoption? In answering these questions, Greenfield’s timely guide clarifies the scale and nature of the crisis we now confront —and offers ways to reclaim our stake in the future.

    In coversation with Luke Robert Mason (Director, Virtual Futures).

    F…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L37uYJnDxVY&t=30s
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 28 Dec 2017 23:55:34 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  5. Everything is Alive: Louis, Can of Cola

    Everything is Alive — Interviews with inanimate object. A bonkers premise for a podcast that is brilliantly realised. Reminiscent of the Creature Comforts short film by Nick Park.

    From here: https://www.radiotopia.fm/podcasts/everything-is-alive

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  6. Donald Hoffman: Do we see reality as it is? | TED Talk | TED.com

    Cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman is trying to answer a big question: Do we experience the world as it really is … or as we need it to be? In this ever so slightly mind-blowing talk, he ponders how our minds construct reality for us.

    http://www.ted.com/talks/donald_hoffman_do_we_see_reality_as_it_is

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  7. Patterns Day: Laura Elizabeth

    Laura Elizabeth speaking at Patterns Day in Brighton on June 30, 2017.

    A one-day event for web designers and developers on design systems, pattern libraries, style guides, and components.

    Patterns Day is brought to you by Clearleft.

    https://patternsday.com/

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  8. Patterns Day: Ellen de Vries

    Ellen de Vries speaking at Patterns Day in Brighton on June 30, 2017.

    A one-day event for web designers and developers on design systems, pattern libraries, style guides, and components.

    Patterns Day is brought to you by Clearleft.

    https://patternsday.com/

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  9. Patterns Day: Sareh Heidari

    Sareh Heidari speaking at Patterns Day in Brighton on June 30, 2017.

    A one-day event for web designers and developers on design systems, pattern libraries, style guides, and components.

    Patterns Day is brought to you by Clearleft.

    https://patternsday.com/

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

  10. Patterns Day: Rachel Andrew

    Rachel Andrew speaking at Patterns Day in Brighton on June 30, 2017.

    A one-day event for web designers and developers on design systems, pattern libraries, style guides, and components.

    Patterns Day is brought to you by Clearleft.

    https://patternsday.com/

    —Huffduffed by paulo72

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