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Tagged with “tech” (11)

  1. Spark Special – Marshall McLuhan: Tomorrow Is Our Permanent Address

    Spark presents a special hour of Marshall McLuhan-inspired programming called, Tomorrow Is Our Permanent Address, named after one of McLuhan’s own witty turns of phrase. Today marks the centenary of McLuhan’s birth, and what better way to celebrate than exploring the theories of a man who has been credited with predicting the future of technology.

    Includes - Why The Medium is Still The Message - The Networked City - From Rare to Everywhere (and back again!) - The Googlization of Everything

    —Huffduffed by paperbits

  2. When Patents Attack! | This American Life

    Why would a company rent an office in a tiny town in East Texas, put a nameplate on the door, and leave it completely empty for a year? The answer involves a controversial billionaire physicist in Seattle, a 40 pound cookbook, and a war waging right now, all across the software and tech industries.

    We take you inside this war, and tell the fascinating story of how an idea enshrined in the US constitution to promote progress and innovation, is now being used to do the opposite.

    http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/441/when-patents-attack

    —Huffduffed by paperbits

  3. Sherry Turkle: Expecting More from Technology and Less from Each Other

    MIT professor of technology and society Sherry Turkle discusses the effect our technology has on our social relationships and her new book, Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other. Consider Facebook—it’s a form of human contact, only easier to engage with and easier to avoid. Developing technology promises closeness. Sometimes it delivers, but much of our modern life leaves us less connected with people and more connected to simulations of them. In Alone Together, Sherry Turkle explores the power of our new tools and toys to dramatically alter our social lives. It’s an exploration of what we are looking for—and sacrificing—in a world of electronic companions and social networking tools, and an argument that, despite the hand-waving of today’s self-described prophets of the future, it will be the next generation who will chart the path between isolation and connectivity.

    http://forum-network.org/lecture/sherry-turkle-why-we-expect-more-technology-and-less-each-other

    —Huffduffed by paperbits

  4. James Gleick On The History Of Information : NPR

    In his book The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood, James Gleick writes of information sharing through the ages, from African talking drum languages to telegraphs, telephones and the internet. Google search guru Scott Huffman also joins to talk about how Google refines the search for information on the internet.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/06/17/137250835/james-gleick-on-the-history-of-information

    —Huffduffed by paperbits

  5. Kathy Sierra | How to Kick Ass

    Kathy Sierra talks about expertise and neuroscience. The study of the differences between the world class performer and the average performer reveals something more important than genetics. Sierra shares several tips on how everyone can improve their performance and the most important factors in getting really good at something.

    http://itc.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail3773.html#

    —Huffduffed by paperbits

  6. James Bridle — Wrangling Time: The Form and Future of the Book

    The internet has been around long enough now that it has a proper history, and it has started to produce media and artefacts that live in and comment on that history. James will be talking about his work with writing, books and wikipedia that hopes to explain and illuminate this temporal depth.

    James Bridle is a publisher, writer and artist based in London, UK. He founded the print-on-demand classics press Bookkake and the e-book-only imprint Artists’ eBooks, and created Bkkeepr, a tool for tracking reading and sharing bookmarks, and Quietube, an accidental anti-censorship proxy for the Middle East. He makes things with words, books and the internet, and writes about what he does at booktwo.org.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/james-bridle-wrangling-time-the-form-and-future-of-the-book/

    —Huffduffed by paperbits

  7. Is the Internet Making us Smarter?

    As people have become more and more dependent on the Internet, some have concerns that all that information (and the devices that help us connect to it) could be doing seriously damage to the way we think, interact and learn. But Nick Bilton, lead writer for the New York Times Bits Blog, explains in his new book that he’s lived his whole life connected and managed to turn out just fine. He says scientific research backs up his experience.

    —Huffduffed by paperbits

  8. Elements of a Networked Urbanism by Adam Greenfield

    Over the past several years, we’ve watched as a very wide variety of objects and surfaces familiar from everyday life have been reimagined as networked information-gathering, -processing, -storage and -display resources. Why should cities be any different?

    What happens to urban form and metropolitan experience under such circumstances? What are the implications for us, as designers, consumers and as citizens?

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/adamgreenfield/

    Adam Greenfield lives in a city and thinks you probably do, too.

    —Huffduffed by paperbits

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