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ottomatik / Cool Tools Favorite Podcast Episodes

The editors of Cool Tools select their favorite factual podcast episodes.

There are no people in ottomatik’s collective.

Huffduffed (32)

  1. Reply All #79: Boy in Photo

    https://gimletmedia.com/episode/79-boy-in-photo/

    —Huffduffed by ottomatik

  2. Tell Me Something I Don’t Know 007: Jeff Smith

    This is episode 7 of Boing Boing’s, Tell Me Something I Don’t Know. It’s an interview podcast featuring artists, writers, filmmakers, and other creative people discussing their work, ideas, and the reality/business side of how they do what they do.

    Jeff Smith began writing, drawing, and publishing Bone in 1991, through his company, Cartoon Books. He championed self-publishing in the 1990s with other independent cartoonists known as the Spirits of Independents and continues to self-publish through Cartoon Book. Since 1991, Bone has become a world-wide phenomenon, published in nearly 30 languages. In 2005, Scholastic reissued Bone in color through their Graphix imprint, inspiring an entire generation of young cartoonists who found his work through traditional book stores, comic book shops, schools, and libraries. He followed the Tolkien-esque, Bone, with Shazam! The Monster Society of Evil (DC Comics) and RASL (Cartoon Books) - a sci-fi noir about a dimension-hopping art thief. Smith recently announced his next project, Tüki Save the Humans, about the first human to leave Africa during the Ice Age.

    Tell Me Something I Don’t Know is produced and hosted by three talented cartoonists and illustrators:

    Jim Rugg, a Pittsburgh-based comic book artist, graphic designer, zinemaker, and writer best known for Afrodisiac, The Plain Janes, and Street Angel. His latest project is SUPERMAG.

    Jasen Lex is a designer and illustrator from Pittsburgh. He is currently working on a graphic novel called Washington Unbound. All of his art and comics can be found at jasenlex.com.

    Ed Piskor is the cartoonist who drew the comic, Wizzywig, and draws the Brain Rot/ Hip Hop Family Tree comic strip at this very site, soon to be collected by Fantagraphics Books and available for pre-order now.

    download

    Tagged with boing boing

    —Huffduffed by ottomatik

  3. Gweek 095: Ruben Bolling and Nate DiMeo - Boing Boing

    —Huffduffed by ottomatik

  4. The Incomparable #66: Regular People Like Us

    Ernest Cline’s “Ready Player One” is a sci-fi novel that’s chock full of references to 1980s culture. But is it a good book, or are the references all that it’s got going for it? What will John Hughes movies be like in the future? And what do Cline, P.G. Wodehouse, and Umberto Eco have in common?

    http://5by5.tv/incomparable/66

    —Huffduffed by ottomatik

  5. Crumb on 78 RPM records 2

    —Huffduffed by ottomatik

  6. Crumb on 78 RPM records 1

    —Huffduffed by ottomatik

  7. Daniel Kottke Interview

    Avi Solomon interviewed Daniel Kottke at his home in Palo Alto on 2nd September, 2011. He says: "I had a wide-ranging conversation with Daniel Kottke (Apple employee #12) on Silicon Valley’s innovation culture. Daniel also talked about his trip to India with Steve Jobs during their hippie years: Steve Jobs did not find miracles in the ashrams of India but he made the true magic happen in a garage in California."

    —Huffduffed by ottomatik

  8. The Conversation #27: Missionless Statements

    The Conversation #27: Missionless Statements - 5by5

    http://5by5.tv/conversation/27

    —Huffduffed by ottomatik

  9. Adrian Tomine interview on the Bat Segundo Show

    Subjects Discussed: Doing time in Sacramento, veiling a personal experience with a sex change, which of Tomine’s characters is least like him, the liberation that comes in fabrication, scratched out names and Victorian literature, the original small audiences for Scenes and 32 Stories, the father’s fund, taking criticisms to heart, the drawbacks of working in the same realist vein, Tomine’s wife as the “first audience,” the artist’s fragile ego, the influence of printed literature and storytelling upon art, humbling versions of inspiration, Tomine’s degrees of aspiration and ambition, living a life in service to the drawing, facing the world, the “strenuous” exigencies of cartoonists, drawing panels without decor, Tomine’s perfectionist qualities, the freedom in pursuing work that isn’t going to be reviewed, feeling highly scrutinized, the pleasure in publishing harsh letters, the look of the ranger, using the fewest lines to get the maximum amount of detail, settling upon the three panel approach, maintaining a private style in secret scrapbooks, varying levels of creative insulation from the public, the very low frequency of sound words, the tongue licking in “Alter Ego,” seeing external details that other characters cannot, the grotesque reality of Chris Ware’s furry cats, the number of people who read books in Tomine’s New Yorker illustrations, the Venn diagram between 1990s subcultures and digital culture, disappearing subcultures, cartoonists who detest hippie and hipster culture, gesture and look, Alison Bechdel’s elaborate photographic process, and the pursuit of “realism” in an “unreal” medium.

    —Huffduffed by ottomatik

  10. Boing Boing - Interview Maryn McKenna, author of Superbug: The Fatal Menace of MRSA

    Mark Frauenfelder of boingboing.net interviews Maryn McKenna, author of Superbug: The Fatal Menace of MRSA.

    Lurking in our homes, hospitals, schools, and farms is a terrifying pathogen that is evolving faster than the medical community can track it or drug developers can create antibiotics to quell it. That pathogen is MRSA—methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus—and Superbug is the first book to tell the story of its shocking spread and the alarming danger it poses to us all. Doctors long thought that MRSA was confined to hospitals and clinics, infecting almost exclusively those who were either already ill or old. But through remarkable reporting, including hundreds of interviews with the leading researchers and doctors tracking the deadly bacterium, acclaimed science journalist Maryn McKenna reveals the hidden history of MRSA’s relentless advance—how it has overwhelmed hospitals, assaulted families, and infiltrated agriculture and livestock, moving inexorably into the food chain. Taking readers into the medical centers where frustrated physicians must discard drug after drug as they struggle to keep patients alive, she discloses an explosion of cases that demonstrate how MRSA is growing more virulent, while evolving resistance to antibiotics with astonishing speed. It may infect us at any time, no matter how healthy we are; it is carried by a stunning number of our household pets; and it has been detected in food animals from cows to chickens to pigs.

    With the sensitivity of a novelist, McKenna portrays the emotional and financial devastation endured by MRSA’s victims, vividly describing the many stealthy ways in which the pathogen overtakes the body and the shock and grief of parents whose healthy children were felled by infection in just hours. Through dogged detective work, she discloses the unheard warnings that predicted the current crisis and lays bare the flaws that have allowed MRSA to rage out of control: misplaced government spending, inadequate public health surveillance, misguided agricultural practices, and vast overuse of the few precious drugs we have left.

    Empowering readers with the knowledge they need for self-defense, Superbug sounds an alarm: MRSA has evolved into a global emergency that touches almost every aspect of modern life. It is, as one deeply concerned researcher tells McKenna, "the biggest thing since AIDS."

    —Huffduffed by ottomatik

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