Experience and the Emotion Commotion

Possibly related…

  1. Make It So: Learning From SciFi Interfaces by Nathan Shedroff and Chris Noessel

    Make It So explores how science fiction and interface design relate to each other. The authors have developed a model that traces lines of influence between the two, and use this as a scaffold to investigate how the depiction of technologies evolve over time, how fictional interfaces influence those in the real world, and what lessons interface designers can learn through this process. This investigation of science fiction television shows and movies has yielded practical lessons that apply to online, social, mobile, and other media interfaces.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/nathanshedroff/

    Nathan Shedroff is the chair of the ground-breaking MBA in Design Strategy at California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco, CA. This program melds the unique principles that design offers business strategy with a vision of the future of business as sustainable, meaningful, and truly innovative — as well as profitable.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/chrisnoessel/

    Chris Noessel is an interaction designer and self-described “nomothete” (ask him directly about that one.) In his day job as a consultant with Cooper, he designs products, services, and strategy for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and software.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  2. What’s Next? How Mobile is Changing Design by Brian Fling

    Mobile is evolving, the web is adapting, and these two colossal worlds are about to collide to create something new. In order to design the experiences of this new contextual web, we need to change the way we look at design. In this talk Brian will provide his insights on some of the emerging trends in mobile design and share his thoughts on how we will design the interfaces of tomorrow.

    http://2009.dconstruct.org/schedule/brianfling/

    Brian Fling has been a leader in creating interactive experiences for both the web and mobile mediums. He has worked with hundreds of businesses from early stage start-ups to Fortune 50 companies to leverage new media around the needs of real peoples.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  3. Beyond Usability: Mapping Emotion to Experience

    Addiction or devotion? The complexity of our relationships between connected experiences, devices and people is increasing. Stanley Kubrick once said a film “should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what‛s behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later”.

    Design ethnographer Kelly Goto presents underlying emotional indicators that reveal surprising attachments to brands, products, services and devices. Gain insight on designing user experiences that map to people‛s real needs and desires.

    http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/kelly-goto

    As an evangelist for ‘design ethnography’, Kelly Goto is dedicated to understanding how real people integrate products and services into their daily lives. Goto is Principal of gotomedia, LLC, a global leader in research-driven, people-friendly interface design for web, mobile and product solutions for clients including Seiko Epson Japan, Adobe, NetIQ, WebEx and CNET. Her book, Web Redesign 2.0: Workflow That Works, is a standard for user-centered design principles. Goto is also the editor of gotomobile.com, a leading online publication on mobile user experience and serves on the national board of the AIGA Center for Brand Experience.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct

  4. The Best Interface Is No Interface - SXSW Interactive 2015

    Two years ago, Golden Krishna made waves with his keynote “The Best Interface is No Interface” at SXSW. Now, he’s back to read from his enthralling new book.

    In an interface-driven world dominated by screens, it’s easy to get caught up looking for solutions in the confinement of a rectangle. Designer Golden Krishna is hoping to end this screen-based thinking.

    Join Golden as he reads highlights from his upcoming book, "The Best Interface is No Interface” – originally an essay that went viral and led to an international lecture tour – that will challenge you to make beautiful technology that solves problems without using screens.

    Don’t miss a unique and entertaining mashup reading from the book that design legend Donald Norman called “an irreverent crazy tirade” where the “irreverence is precisely what is needed today to get us out of the rut of bad, unintelligible, frustrating design.”

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  5. Responsive Day Out 3: Peter, Jason, and Heydon chatting with Jeremy

    Peter Gasston, Jason Grigsby, and Heydon Pickering speaking with Jeremy Keith at the third Responsive Day Out in Brighton on June 19th.

    The Responsive Day Out is an affordable, enjoyable gathering of UK designers and developers sharing their workflow strategies, techniques, and experiences with responsive web design.

    http://responsiveconf.com/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Responsive Day Out 3: Rosie, Lyza, and Aaron chatting with Jeremy

    Rosie Campbell, Lyza Gardner, and Aaron Gustafson speaking with Jeremy Keith at the third Responsive Day Out in Brighton on June 19th.

    The Responsive Day Out is an affordable, enjoyable gathering of UK designers and developers sharing their workflow strategies, techniques, and experiences with responsive web design.

    http://responsiveconf.com/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Designing the future - Tech Weekly podcast

    We may not have jetpacks and flying cars, but artificial intelligence is taking ever greater strides.

    This week on the podcast we look one day into the future at some of the biggest technological designs of the next few years set to beam out of this year’s dConstruct Conference, part of the Brighton Digital festival.

    Joining Alex Hern on the panel is time traveller Ingrid Burrington who argues that the time machines of today don’t look like Deloreans, they look like NTP servers, real-time data streams and predictive models, Nick Foster an industrial designer working on future projects for google and Carla Diana who thinks that the robot takeover will start in our kitchens.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/audio/2015/sep/10/design-future-dconstruct-conference-brighton-tech-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Infinite Inputs

    In the beginning… there was the keyboard and the mouse. Today, the kinds of input our computing devices support keeps growing: touch, voice, device motion, and much more. Each additional input type offers new possibilities for interaction that requires our interface designs to adapt.

    When will this deluge of new input types end so don’t have to keep re-designing our software? It won’t. Not until everything is input.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/luke/

    Luke Wroblewski is the Zelig of the web world. Think of all the major turning points in the history of the web and I bet you’ll find that Luke was involved in some way.

    It all started back with his stint at NCSA, birthplace of the world-changing Mosaic web browser. Since then Luke has gone to work with all manner of companies, large (like Yahoo) and small (like Bagcheck). His latest startup is Polar, the mobile app that’s like hot-or-not for the world, getting big value from micro interactions.

    Along the way, Luke has made the web a better place thanks to his meticulously-researched books. He wrote the book on web form design. He wrote the book on mobile first design. Heck, he even coined the term “mobile first” …which means he‘s mobile first first.

    There‘s no shortage of people in Silicon Valley with opinions about technology, but what sets Luke apart is his razor-sharp focus on data. So whatever it is he has to say at dConstruct, you can be sure that it’s backed up with facts.

    Luke is also a blogging machine. You can try to keep up with the firehose at lukew.com.

    —Huffduffed by dConstruct