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nsmsn / Nick Simson

Communication/web/graphic designer. Caretaker of a mutt named Zelda. Alive and at work in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA.

There are no people in nsmsn’s collective.

Huffduffed (78)

  1. Episode 652: The Hydrox Resurrection : Planet Money : NPR

    Hidden in the trash heap of commerce there is buried treasure. Abandoned brands—including trusted, beloved brands—are waiting to be claimed and reborn. Today on the show: A cookie comeback.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2017/08/23/545546014/episode-652-the-hydrox-resurrection

    —Huffduffed by nsmsn

  2. 002: Frank Chimero, The New Golden Age of Bookmaking

    Designer and author Frank Chimero discusses the process behind his book, "The Shape of Design." We also dig into the normalization of paying creative people to make things via crowdfunding or patronage platforms, and why there’s never been a better time to make books. Show Links: 

    frankchimero.com Shape of Design online

    Shape of Design Kickstarter Kevin Kelly’s 1,000 true fans

    Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls, Kickstarter

    Robin Sloan Writes a Book, Kickstarter

    The Field Study Handbook Kickstarter Art Space Tokyo Kickstartup: Successful fundraising with Kickstarter and remaking Art Space Tokyo

    Full transcript and audio online at: https://craigmod.com/onmargins/002/  

    https://craigmod.com/onmargins/002/

    —Huffduffed by nsmsn

  3. Emily Pothast on A Rude Awakening - May 30, 2016 | KPFA

    More than a year before Charlottesville, when the mainstream establishment saw no chance of Trump actually winning via the Electoral College, alternative left coast media was seriously discussing the alt-right, white supremacy and the weird, frightening reality we are all living in now.

    —Huffduffed by nsmsn

  4. Thwarting a “United Right” in Charlottesville | Sarah Jaffe

    Lisa Woolfork of Charlottesville Black Lives Matter on on the community’s response to its “summer of hate” and confederate monuments to white supremacy.

    https://thebaffler.com/interviews-for-resistance/thwarting-a-united-right

    —Huffduffed by nsmsn

  5. Bruce O’Neill, “The Space of Boredom: Homelessness in the Slowing Global Order” (Duke University Press, 2017) |

    In The Space of Boredom: Homelessness in the Slowing Global Order (Duke University Press, 2017) Bruce O’Neill explores how people cast aside by globalism deal with an intractable symptom of downward mobility: an unshakeable and immense boredom. Focusing on Bucharest, Romania, where the 2008 financial crisis compounded the failures of the postsocialist state to deliver on the promises of liberalism, O’Neill shows how the city’s homeless are unable to fully participate in a society that is increasingly organized around practices of consumption. Without a job to work, a home to make, or money to spend, the homeless—who include pensioners abandoned by their families and the state—struggle daily with the slow deterioration of their lives. O’Neill moves between homeless shelters and squatter camps, black labor markets and transit stations, detailing the lives of men and women who manage boredom by seeking stimulation, from conversation and coffee to sex in public restrooms or going to the mall or IKEA. Showing how boredom correlates with the downward mobility of Bucharest’s homeless, O’Neill theorizes boredom as an enduring affect of globalization in order to provide a foundation from which to rethink the politics of alienation and displacement.

    Nivedita Kar is a student at the University of Southern California, having graduated from UCLA with a double major in Anthropology and Statistics and a masters degree for Northwestern University in biostatistics and epidemiology. She is immersed in the realm of academia and medicine, she hopes to be one of the rare few who aim to bridge the gap between clinical literacy and statistical methods.

    http://files.newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/011anthropologyoneill.mp3Podcast: Download (Duration: 20:02 — 9.2MB)Share/Like this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)

    http://newbooksnetwork.com/bruce-oneill-the-space-of-boredom-homelessness-in-the-slowing-global-order-duke-university-press-2017/

    —Huffduffed by nsmsn

  6. Justin Gest, “The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality” (Oxford UP, 2016) |

    In our era of economic instability, rising inequality, and widespread immigration, complaints about fairness and life chances are coming from an interesting source: white people, specifically members of the working class. This group was once central to the politics of the United States and United Kingdom, and national pride and identity were synonymous with the blue-collar work these people did. Today they live in a country that they feel is no longer “for them.” They feel powerless, as minority groups do.

    In The New Minority: White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality (Oxford University Press, 2016), Assistant Professor of Public Policy Justin Gest examines how this group has been relegated to the political margins in their respective countries, and what the consequences have been for their identity and political behavior. Gest focuses on Youngstown, Ohio and East London, which he considers to be two “post-traumatic” cities, or places that have experienced major economic loss without sufficient replacement, and have never fully recovered. The story, of course, is the decline of manufacturing, and Gest reveals the significant political impacts of this devastating transformation. Based on research conducted before the Brexit vote and the campaign and election of Donald Trump, this enlightening book provides much-needed explanations for how these key events came to be embraced by a large swath of their country’s populations. Most importantly, it does so by meeting this underprivileged group where they live, and letting them voice their concerns. People from all political backgrounds ought to listen.

    Richard E. Ocejo is associate professor of sociology at John Jay College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). He is the author of Masters of Craft: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy (Princeton University Press, 2017), about the transformation of low-status occupations into cool, cultural taste-making jobs (cocktail bartenders, craft distillers, upscale mens barbers, and whole animal butchers), and of Upscaling Downtown: From Bowery Saloons to Cocktail Bars in New York City (Princeton University Press, 2014), about growth policies, nightlife, and conflict in gentrified neighborhoods. His work has appeared in such journals as City & Community, Poetics, Ethnography,and the European Journal of Cultural Studies. He is also the editor of Ethnography and the City: Readings on Doing Urban Fieldwork (Routledge, 2012) and serves on the editorial boards of the journals Metropolitics, Work and Occupations, and the Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography.

    http://files.newbooksnetwork.com/sociology/041sociologygest.mp3Podcast: Download (Duration: 39:32 — 18.1MB)Share/Like this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)

    http://newbooksnetwork.com/justin-gest-the-new-minority-white-working-class-politics-in-an-age-of-immigration-and-inequality-oxford-up-2016/

    —Huffduffed by nsmsn

  7. Military Analyst On ‘The Great Hysteria’ Surrounding Trump’s Presidency | Here & Now

    Andrew Bacevich says people should spend less time worrying about President Trump and more time thinking about the context of his election.

    http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2017/08/14/great-hysteria-trump-presidency

    —Huffduffed by nsmsn

  8. Ilana Gershon, “Down and Out in the New Economy: How People Find (or Don’t Find) Work Today” (U. Chicago Press, 2017) |

    Labor markets are not what they used to be, as Ilana Gershon argues in Down and Out in the New Economy: How People Find (or Don’t Find) Work Today (University of Chicago Press, 2017). Job seekers are increasingly being taught that they need to sell themselves as if they were their own business, and what will set them apart from other applicants is not their skills or their experience, but the distinctiveness of their brand. Join us for a provocative discussion about how workers are being taught to position themselves to employers, and how modern labor markets, as a consequence, differ from those in the past — and why that matters.

    Stephen Pimpare is Senior Lecturer in the Politics & Society Program and Faculty Fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. He is the author of The New Victorians (New Press, 2004), A People’s History of Poverty in America (New Press, 2008), winner of the Michael Harrington Award, and Ghettos, Tramps and Welfare Queens: Down and Out on the Silver Screen (Oxford University Press, 2017).

    http://files.newbooksnetwork.com/publicpolicy/052publicpolicygershon.mp3Podcast: Download (Duration: 42:54 — 39.3MB)Share/Like this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)

    http://newbooksnetwork.com/ilana-gershon-down-and-out-in-the-new-economy-how-people-find-or-dont-find-work-today-u-chicago-press-2017/

    —Huffduffed by nsmsn

  9. Daniel Dreisbach, “Reading the Bible with the Founding Fathers” (Oxford UP, 2016) |

    No book was more accessible or familiar to the American founders than the Bible, and no book was more frequently alluded to or quoted from in the political discourse of the age. How and for what purposes did the founding generation use the Bible? How did the Bible influence their political culture?

    Shedding new light on some of the most familiar rhetoric of the founding era, Daniel Dreisbach analyzes the founders’ diverse use of scripture, ranging from the literary to the theological. He shows that they looked to the Bible for insights on human nature, civic virtue, political authority, and the rights and duties of citizens, as well as for political and legal models to emulate. They quoted Scripture to authorize civil resistance, to invoke divine blessings for righteous nations, and to provide the language of liberty that would be appropriated by patriotic Americans.

    Reading the Bible with the Founding Fathers (Oxford University Press, 2016) broaches the perennial question of whether the American founding was, to some extent, informed by religious–specifically Christian–ideas. In the sense that the founding generation were members of a biblically literate society that placed the Bible at the center of culture and discourse, the answer to that question is clearly yes. Ignoring the Bible’s influence on the founders, Dreisbach warns, produces a distorted image of the American political experiment, and of the concept of self-government on which America is built.

    http://files.newbooksnetwork.com/religion/078religiondreisbach.mp3Podcast: Download (Duration: 37:59 — 34.8MB)Share/Like this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)

    http://newbooksnetwork.com/daniel-dreisbach-reading-the-bible-with-the-founding-fathers-oxford-up-2016/

    —Huffduffed by nsmsn

  10. Timothy LaPira, “Revolving Door Lobbying: Public Service, Private Influence, and the Unequal Representation of Interests” (U Press of Kansas, 2017) |

    Timothy LaPira and Herschel Thomas are the authors of Revolving Door Lobbying: Public Service, Private Influence, and the Unequal Representation of Interests (University Press of Kansas, 2017). LaPira is associate professor of political science at James Madison University; Thomas is assistant professor of political science at University of Texas, Arlington.

    What is the consequence of the rapid spin of the revolving door in Washington? Once a rarity, today nearly half of members of Congress join a lobbying firm after their time on the Hill ends. In Revolving Door Lobbying, the authors show that they are not alone. Former aides join the ranks of lobbyists and generate massive amounts of revenue for lobbying and law firms. This patterns have changed the political economy of Washington politics. LaPira and Thomas mine a decade of new Lobbying Disclosure Act (LDA) data to show the way the rise of revolving door lobbying has made representation less equal and enhanced private influence.

    The host of this weeks podcast is Heath Brown, associate professor of public policy at the City University of New York, John Jay College and the CUNY Graduate Center.

    http://files.newbooksnetwork.com/polisci/248politicalsciencelapira.mp3Podcast: Download (Duration: 30:19 — 27.8MB)Share/Like this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)

    http://newbooksnetwork.com/timothy-lapira-revolving-door-lobbying-public-service-private-influence-and-the-unequal-representation-of-interests-u-press-of-kansas-2017/

    —Huffduffed by nsmsn

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