nickf / Nick Finck

Owner of Blue Flavor, Founder of Digital Web Magazine, all around User Experience guy.

There are two people in nickf’s collective.

Huffduffed (15)

  1. Why usability is no longer enough

    Eric Schaffer declares that "Usability is no longer enough" in this compelling introduction to designing for Persuasion, Emotion, and Trust (PET design)

    —Huffduffed by nickf

  2. Grant Robinson – Visualising the user experience | Web Directions

    Designing for dynamic web applications and mobile devices poses a new set of challenges. Web designers are increasingly being asked to apply their skills to where the page model no longer applies. We need new ways of exploring the user experience and communicating behaviours involving sub-page changes and movement.

    Enter rapid prototyping. Widely acclaimed as one of the best ways to create great user experiences, it isn’t without its own pitfalls. This session will discuss the pros and cons of different prototyping techniques, and introduce a new technique called “screenflows” that focuses on visualising the user experience. Discover how to combine the best of paper prototyping, wireframes and HTML prototyping into one simple and effective prototyping technique. Learn how using this method can dramatically decrease the need for documentation, while increasing the speed and agility of the development process.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/grant-robinson-visualising-the-user-experience/

    —Huffduffed by nickf

  3. A User’s Guide to Managing Experience Teams

    A User’s Guide to Managing Experience Teams

    —Huffduffed by nickf

  4. User Experience Best Practices

    Nick will explore the best practices of user experience by reviewing some of the most popular and highly trafficked websites today such as eBay, Amazon, Toyota, Flickr, Twitter, Netflix and more. Nick will identify and explain both good an bad experiences on these sites on the merits of visual design, information architecture, interaction, and ease of use. If there is time we will open the floor for audience submissions and to provide quick feedback and areas of improvement.

    —Huffduffed by nickf

  5. Experience Strategies | Jesse James Garrett

    Recorded 2007-02-12: Understanding the psychology behind how users relate to a product is the key to its lasting success. Users tend to anthropomorphize, or ascribe human personality traits to products they use. Products with long-term success have developers who recognize the identity and personality of the product they want to convey. They create integrity with the product and how their users will interact with it.

    —Huffduffed by nickf

  6. Robert Hoekman Jr — The essential elements of great web applications

    A presentation given at at Web Directions User Experience, Melbourne Town Hall, May 16 2008, and Web Direction Government, Old Parliament House, Canberra, May 19 2008.

    Most great web applications have a few key things in common. But can you name them? Better yet — can you achieve them consistently in your own projects?

    In this closing keynote, Robert Hoekman, Jr., author of the Amazon bestseller Designing the Obvious (New Riders) describes the seven qualities of great web-based software and how to achieve each and every one of them by learning to communicate through design. See why it’s important to build only what’s absolutely essential, apply instructive design, create error-proof interactions, surface commonly-used features, and more in this informative session that will change the way you work and enable your users to walk away from your software feeling productive, respected, and smart

    From: http://www.webdirections.org/resources/robert-hoekman-jr/

    —Huffduffed by nickf

  7. The IA Summit Closing Plenary by Jesse James Garrett

    Jesse James Garrett is a noted figure in the IA community, not only for his ground breaking book Elements of User Experience, but for the essay that galvanized the community in 2002, IA Recon .

    In this IA Summit Closing Plenary, given without slides while wandering amidst the audience, Jesse examines what he has learned at the conference, he thoughts on the nature of the discipline and the practitioner, and gives bold, perhaps even shocking advice for the future direction of information architecture.

    Transcript: http://jjg.net/ia/memphis/

    From: http://boxesandarrows.com/view/ia-summit-09-plenary/

    —Huffduffed by nickf

  8. IA Summit 09 - Jesse James Garrett

    "… Jesse James Garrett Slams One Door and Opens Many More" http://boxesandarrows.com/view/ia-summit-09-plenary

    —Huffduffed by nickf

  9. Suze Ingram – Would you like service design with that?

    Service design is a new discipline which focuses on understanding what customers want, then designing services which meet their needs. Sound familiar? Web designers have focused on user-centred design for years to create websites and applications that are user friendly.

    Service design is well established in Europe and North America and there’s already a handful of Australian businesses offering service design. What is it? Does experience in designing for screen interaction translate to designing services too? Will service design be the next big thing? Suze offers insight by drawing on her years of experience as a UX designer and researcher. She shows how service design might fit into your business in the future, who you might pitch it to, and what sort of skills you might need to deliver service design.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/suze-ingram-would-you-like-service-design-with-that/

    —Huffduffed by nickf

  10. Christina Wodtke - Social Spaces Online: Lessons from Radical Architects

    While Information Architecture took its name from architecture, it took very little else. This is not surprising, as the early days of the web were about making sites that supported the interaction between people and data. The obvious model back then was a library; a library is a space for humans to receive knowledge. But with the rise of social networks, and the integration of community into almost all online experiences, more architecture practices are directly transferable to design. Online spaces are no longer just about findability, but about falling in love, getting your work done, goofing around, reconnecting with old friends, staving off loneliness… humans doing human things.

    http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/idea-2009-day-1

    —Huffduffed by nickf

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