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  1. 3Keith Wailoo – Pain with a ‘Psychogenic Overlay’: The Gendered Politics of Experience and Disability in US Society | Backdoor Broadcasting Company

    Event Date: 24 – 25 March 2017

    Room G15 and G16

    Birkbeck Main Building

    Birkbeck, University of London

    Torrington Square

    London WC1E 7HX

    The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in association with the Birkbeck Trauma Project presents:

    Gender and Pain in Modern History

    In 2012, The Journal of Pain published a definitive study about the relationship between gender and pain, showing that for the vast majority of ailments, women reported significantly higher levels of pain (approximately twenty per cent higher) than men. In a variety of historical contexts, the female body has been associated with heightened sensitivity of various types. These images were borne out by cultural representations of female delicacy. However, female bodies have also been singled out for their ability to bear heightened pain, especially during childbirth. Representations of male stoicism (or perceived lack thereof) in the face of pain have also been a powerful image in many contexts. Women and men have long been thought to experience bodily sensations including discomfort and pain in a variety of culturally and historically specific ways: pain has routinely been gendered.

    This two-day conference focuses on the historical relationship(s) between gender and pain between the early modern period and the present day. It aims to foster discussion among experts working on women’s history, the history of masculinity, and the history of gender; the history of science, health, and medicine; and the history of the body, with perspectives from a variety of national contexts and disciplinary backgrounds.

    Keynote 1:

    Professor Keith Wailoo (Princeton University) – Pain with a ‘Psychogenic Overlay’: The Gendered Politics of Experience and Disability in US Society

    Introduction by Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck):

    ——————————

    Talk:

    —————————–

    Questions:

     

    Gender and Pain in Modern History

    March 24, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

     

    Lisa Smith – Imagining the Hidden: Inexpressible Suffering in the Eighteenth Century

    March 25, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

    share this entry:

    http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2017/03/keith-wailoo-pain-with-a-psychogenic-overlay-the-gendered-politics-of-experience-and-disability-in-us-society/

    —Huffduffed by sapolion

  2. 2Keith Wailoo – Pain with a ‘Psychogenic Overlay’: The Gendered Politics of Experience and Disability in US Society | Backdoor Broadcasting Company

    Event Date: 24 – 25 March 2017

    Room G15 and G16

    Birkbeck Main Building

    Birkbeck, University of London

    Torrington Square

    London WC1E 7HX

    The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in association with the Birkbeck Trauma Project presents:

    Gender and Pain in Modern History

    In 2012, The Journal of Pain published a definitive study about the relationship between gender and pain, showing that for the vast majority of ailments, women reported significantly higher levels of pain (approximately twenty per cent higher) than men. In a variety of historical contexts, the female body has been associated with heightened sensitivity of various types. These images were borne out by cultural representations of female delicacy. However, female bodies have also been singled out for their ability to bear heightened pain, especially during childbirth. Representations of male stoicism (or perceived lack thereof) in the face of pain have also been a powerful image in many contexts. Women and men have long been thought to experience bodily sensations including discomfort and pain in a variety of culturally and historically specific ways: pain has routinely been gendered.

    This two-day conference focuses on the historical relationship(s) between gender and pain between the early modern period and the present day. It aims to foster discussion among experts working on women’s history, the history of masculinity, and the history of gender; the history of science, health, and medicine; and the history of the body, with perspectives from a variety of national contexts and disciplinary backgrounds.

    Keynote 1:

    Professor Keith Wailoo (Princeton University) – Pain with a ‘Psychogenic Overlay’: The Gendered Politics of Experience and Disability in US Society

    Introduction by Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck):

    ——————————

    Talk:

    —————————–

    Questions:

     

    Gender and Pain in Modern History

    March 24, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

     

    Lisa Smith – Imagining the Hidden: Inexpressible Suffering in the Eighteenth Century

    March 25, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

    share this entry:

    http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2017/03/keith-wailoo-pain-with-a-psychogenic-overlay-the-gendered-politics-of-experience-and-disability-in-us-society/

    —Huffduffed by sapolion

  3. Tom Vasel on where he hopes the gaming industry goes next.

    —Huffduffed by randyhoyt

  4. 1Keith Wailoo – Pain with a ‘Psychogenic Overlay’: The Gendered Politics of Experience and Disability in US Society | Backdoor Broadcasting Company

    Event Date: 24 – 25 March 2017

    Room G15 and G16

    Birkbeck Main Building

    Birkbeck, University of London

    Torrington Square

    London WC1E 7HX

    The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in association with the Birkbeck Trauma Project presents:

    Gender and Pain in Modern History

    In 2012, The Journal of Pain published a definitive study about the relationship between gender and pain, showing that for the vast majority of ailments, women reported significantly higher levels of pain (approximately twenty per cent higher) than men. In a variety of historical contexts, the female body has been associated with heightened sensitivity of various types. These images were borne out by cultural representations of female delicacy. However, female bodies have also been singled out for their ability to bear heightened pain, especially during childbirth. Representations of male stoicism (or perceived lack thereof) in the face of pain have also been a powerful image in many contexts. Women and men have long been thought to experience bodily sensations including discomfort and pain in a variety of culturally and historically specific ways: pain has routinely been gendered.

    This two-day conference focuses on the historical relationship(s) between gender and pain between the early modern period and the present day. It aims to foster discussion among experts working on women’s history, the history of masculinity, and the history of gender; the history of science, health, and medicine; and the history of the body, with perspectives from a variety of national contexts and disciplinary backgrounds.

    Keynote 1:

    Professor Keith Wailoo (Princeton University) – Pain with a ‘Psychogenic Overlay’: The Gendered Politics of Experience and Disability in US Society

    Introduction by Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck):

    ——————————

    Talk:

    —————————–

    Questions:

     

    Gender and Pain in Modern History

    March 24, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

     

    Lisa Smith – Imagining the Hidden: Inexpressible Suffering in the Eighteenth Century

    March 25, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

    share this entry:

    http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2017/03/keith-wailoo-pain-with-a-psychogenic-overlay-the-gendered-politics-of-experience-and-disability-in-us-society/

    —Huffduffed by sapolion

  5. Ep. 005 - Sarah Hennies - “Sound Signs”

    (In my work) there’s this sort of underlying belief or tenet that whatever sound we’re hearing probably has a lot more going on with it than we’re either aware of or are giving it credit for.” - Sarah Hennies   Today’s episode is all about identity and understanding yourself through your own creations. Sarah Hennies joins us and premiers the piece “Pressure”, which is created entirely from one piece of percussion: the hi-hat. By varying the pressure of the foot pedal on the hi-hat, Sarah changes the quality of the sound and the various tones that are emitted. Different speeds on the metronome are set and multi-tracked, and the results are presented as they were recorded. The result is a cascade of overlapping percussion sounds that can be felt physically in the body.   Sarah discusses how a piece like “Pressure”, which is one of the first recorded examples of her composed music, gave her clues about herself. At one time, it seemed like a good idea to use this approach in her music. She came back to the idea of music that can be “felt” later in life, and realized she touched on it with “Pressure” at a previous time. Looking back with renewed clarity, Sarah was able to gain insights about herself at that time in her life and use this to create a more refined work. At another point, Sarah decided that physically demanding, labor intensive performances were going to be her focus. What does that say about her? There was a reason she came up her ideas at a specific time in her life. Sarah saw inadvertent signs in her music, and now she uses these signs and layers of meaning purposefully as tools in her compositional process.   Sarah Hennies website Gather & Release EMDR Therapy Organ For The Senses / Parkeology

    http://signifyingsomething.libsyn.com/ep-005-sarah-hennies-sound-signs

    —Huffduffed by justingoboom

  6. 3Lisa Smith – Imagining the Hidden: Inexpressible Suffering in the Eighteenth Century | Backdoor Broadcasting Company

    Event Date: 24 – 25 March 2017

    Room G15 and G16

    Birkbeck Main Building

    Birkbeck, University of London

    Torrington Square

    London WC1E 7HX

    The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in association with the Birkbeck Trauma Project presents:

    Gender and Pain in Modern History

    In 2012, The Journal of Pain published a definitive study about the relationship between gender and pain, showing that for the vast majority of ailments, women reported significantly higher levels of pain (approximately twenty per cent higher) than men. In a variety of historical contexts, the female body has been associated with heightened sensitivity of various types. These images were borne out by cultural representations of female delicacy. However, female bodies have also been singled out for their ability to bear heightened pain, especially during childbirth. Representations of male stoicism (or perceived lack thereof) in the face of pain have also been a powerful image in many contexts. Women and men have long been thought to experience bodily sensations including discomfort and pain in a variety of culturally and historically specific ways: pain has routinely been gendered.

    This two-day conference focuses on the historical relationship(s) between gender and pain between the early modern period and the present day. It aims to foster discussion among experts working on women’s history, the history of masculinity, and the history of gender; the history of science, health, and medicine; and the history of the body, with perspectives from a variety of national contexts and disciplinary backgrounds.

    Keynote 2:

    Dr Lisa Smith (Essex) – Imagining the Hidden: Inexpressible Suffering in the Eighteenth Century

    Introduction by Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck):

    ———————-

    Talk:

    ———————-

    Questions:

     

     

    Keith Wailoo – Pain with a ‘Psychogenic Overlay’: The Gendered Politics of Experience and Disability in US Society

    March 24, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

     

    Wendy Kline – Psychedelic Birth: The Countercultural Politics of Pain

    March 26, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

    share this entry:

    http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2017/03/lisa-smith-imagining-the-hidden-inexpressible-suffering-in-the-eighteenth-century/

    —Huffduffed by sapolion

  7. 2Lisa Smith – Imagining the Hidden: Inexpressible Suffering in the Eighteenth Century | Backdoor Broadcasting Company

    Event Date: 24 – 25 March 2017

    Room G15 and G16

    Birkbeck Main Building

    Birkbeck, University of London

    Torrington Square

    London WC1E 7HX

    The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in association with the Birkbeck Trauma Project presents:

    Gender and Pain in Modern History

    In 2012, The Journal of Pain published a definitive study about the relationship between gender and pain, showing that for the vast majority of ailments, women reported significantly higher levels of pain (approximately twenty per cent higher) than men. In a variety of historical contexts, the female body has been associated with heightened sensitivity of various types. These images were borne out by cultural representations of female delicacy. However, female bodies have also been singled out for their ability to bear heightened pain, especially during childbirth. Representations of male stoicism (or perceived lack thereof) in the face of pain have also been a powerful image in many contexts. Women and men have long been thought to experience bodily sensations including discomfort and pain in a variety of culturally and historically specific ways: pain has routinely been gendered.

    This two-day conference focuses on the historical relationship(s) between gender and pain between the early modern period and the present day. It aims to foster discussion among experts working on women’s history, the history of masculinity, and the history of gender; the history of science, health, and medicine; and the history of the body, with perspectives from a variety of national contexts and disciplinary backgrounds.

    Keynote 2:

    Dr Lisa Smith (Essex) – Imagining the Hidden: Inexpressible Suffering in the Eighteenth Century

    Introduction by Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck):

    ———————-

    Talk:

    ———————-

    Questions:

     

     

    Keith Wailoo – Pain with a ‘Psychogenic Overlay’: The Gendered Politics of Experience and Disability in US Society

    March 24, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

     

    Wendy Kline – Psychedelic Birth: The Countercultural Politics of Pain

    March 26, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

    share this entry:

    http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2017/03/lisa-smith-imagining-the-hidden-inexpressible-suffering-in-the-eighteenth-century/

    —Huffduffed by sapolion

  8. 1Lisa Smith – Imagining the Hidden: Inexpressible Suffering in the Eighteenth Century | Backdoor Broadcasting Company

    Event Date: 24 – 25 March 2017

    Room G15 and G16

    Birkbeck Main Building

    Birkbeck, University of London

    Torrington Square

    London WC1E 7HX

    The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in association with the Birkbeck Trauma Project presents:

    Gender and Pain in Modern History

    In 2012, The Journal of Pain published a definitive study about the relationship between gender and pain, showing that for the vast majority of ailments, women reported significantly higher levels of pain (approximately twenty per cent higher) than men. In a variety of historical contexts, the female body has been associated with heightened sensitivity of various types. These images were borne out by cultural representations of female delicacy. However, female bodies have also been singled out for their ability to bear heightened pain, especially during childbirth. Representations of male stoicism (or perceived lack thereof) in the face of pain have also been a powerful image in many contexts. Women and men have long been thought to experience bodily sensations including discomfort and pain in a variety of culturally and historically specific ways: pain has routinely been gendered.

    This two-day conference focuses on the historical relationship(s) between gender and pain between the early modern period and the present day. It aims to foster discussion among experts working on women’s history, the history of masculinity, and the history of gender; the history of science, health, and medicine; and the history of the body, with perspectives from a variety of national contexts and disciplinary backgrounds.

    Keynote 2:

    Dr Lisa Smith (Essex) – Imagining the Hidden: Inexpressible Suffering in the Eighteenth Century

    Introduction by Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck):

    ———————-

    Talk:

    ———————-

    Questions:

     

     

    Keith Wailoo – Pain with a ‘Psychogenic Overlay’: The Gendered Politics of Experience and Disability in US Society

    March 24, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

     

    Wendy Kline – Psychedelic Birth: The Countercultural Politics of Pain

    March 26, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

    share this entry:

    http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2017/03/lisa-smith-imagining-the-hidden-inexpressible-suffering-in-the-eighteenth-century/

    —Huffduffed by sapolion

  9. 3Wendy Kline – Psychedelic Birth: The Countercultural Politics of Pain | Backdoor Broadcasting Company

    Event Date: 24 – 25 March 2017

    Room G15 and G16

    Birkbeck Main Building

    Birkbeck, University of London

    Torrington Square

    London WC1E 7HX

    The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in association with the Birkbeck Trauma Project presents:

    Gender and Pain in Modern History

    In 2012, The Journal of Pain published a definitive study about the relationship between gender and pain, showing that for the vast majority of ailments, women reported significantly higher levels of pain (approximately twenty per cent higher) than men. In a variety of historical contexts, the female body has been associated with heightened sensitivity of various types. These images were borne out by cultural representations of female delicacy. However, female bodies have also been singled out for their ability to bear heightened pain, especially during childbirth. Representations of male stoicism (or perceived lack thereof) in the face of pain have also been a powerful image in many contexts. Women and men have long been thought to experience bodily sensations including discomfort and pain in a variety of culturally and historically specific ways: pain has routinely been gendered.

    This two-day conference focuses on the historical relationship(s) between gender and pain between the early modern period and the present day. It aims to foster discussion among experts working on women’s history, the history of masculinity, and the history of gender; the history of science, health, and medicine; and the history of the body, with perspectives from a variety of national contexts and disciplinary backgrounds.

    Keynote 3:

    Professor Wendy Kline (Purdue University)  – Psychedelic Birth: The Countercultural Politics of Pain

    Introduction by Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck):

    —————————-

    Talk:

    —————————-

    Questions:

     

     

    Lisa Smith – Imagining the Hidden: Inexpressible Suffering in the Eighteenth Century

    March 25, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

     

    Howard Caygill - Image and Accident in Kafka’s Novels - Session 3

    March 27, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

    share this entry:

    http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2017/03/wendy-kline-psychedelic-birth-the-countercultural-politics-of-pain/

    —Huffduffed by sapolion

  10. 2Wendy Kline – Psychedelic Birth: The Countercultural Politics of Pain | Backdoor Broadcasting Company

    Event Date: 24 – 25 March 2017

    Room G15 and G16

    Birkbeck Main Building

    Birkbeck, University of London

    Torrington Square

    London WC1E 7HX

    The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in association with the Birkbeck Trauma Project presents:

    Gender and Pain in Modern History

    In 2012, The Journal of Pain published a definitive study about the relationship between gender and pain, showing that for the vast majority of ailments, women reported significantly higher levels of pain (approximately twenty per cent higher) than men. In a variety of historical contexts, the female body has been associated with heightened sensitivity of various types. These images were borne out by cultural representations of female delicacy. However, female bodies have also been singled out for their ability to bear heightened pain, especially during childbirth. Representations of male stoicism (or perceived lack thereof) in the face of pain have also been a powerful image in many contexts. Women and men have long been thought to experience bodily sensations including discomfort and pain in a variety of culturally and historically specific ways: pain has routinely been gendered.

    This two-day conference focuses on the historical relationship(s) between gender and pain between the early modern period and the present day. It aims to foster discussion among experts working on women’s history, the history of masculinity, and the history of gender; the history of science, health, and medicine; and the history of the body, with perspectives from a variety of national contexts and disciplinary backgrounds.

    Keynote 3:

    Professor Wendy Kline (Purdue University)  – Psychedelic Birth: The Countercultural Politics of Pain

    Introduction by Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck):

    —————————-

    Talk:

    —————————-

    Questions:

     

     

    Lisa Smith – Imagining the Hidden: Inexpressible Suffering in the Eighteenth Century

    March 25, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

     

    Howard Caygill - Image and Accident in Kafka’s Novels - Session 3

    March 27, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

    share this entry:

    http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2017/03/wendy-kline-psychedelic-birth-the-countercultural-politics-of-pain/

    —Huffduffed by sapolion

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